[ ]      [ ]

Stuff I've Said Out Loud - BlueHeronDruid - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:53pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - Alexandra - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:34pm
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos; Please Limit to 510 ... - swell_sailor - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:15pm
 
Gaza - Red_Dragon - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:11pm
 
Evolution! - ScottN - Jul 22, 2014 - 6:38pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - RichardPrins - Jul 22, 2014 - 5:43pm
 
Favorite Quotes - haresfur - Jul 22, 2014 - 5:27pm
 
Ukraine - kurtster - Jul 22, 2014 - 5:14pm
 
What is Humanity's best invention? - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 22, 2014 - 4:33pm
 
Show us your NEW _______________!!!! - DaveInVA - Jul 22, 2014 - 4:12pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - RichardPrins - Jul 22, 2014 - 4:09pm
 
Name My Neurosis - haresfur - Jul 22, 2014 - 4:04pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Antigone - Jul 22, 2014 - 3:18pm
 
OUR CATS!! - MsJudi - Jul 22, 2014 - 2:59pm
 
Military Matters - MsJudi - Jul 22, 2014 - 2:59pm
 
Beta Testers wanted for new iOS app - Christoph86 - Jul 22, 2014 - 2:58pm
 
Baseball, anyone? - bokey - Jul 22, 2014 - 2:51pm
 
Name My Band - javahnagila - Jul 22, 2014 - 2:48pm
 
Climate Change - RichardPrins - Jul 22, 2014 - 1:52pm
 
North Korea - kurtster - Jul 22, 2014 - 1:08pm
 
Mixtape Culture Club - kurtster - Jul 22, 2014 - 1:02pm
 
In Memoriam - miamizsun - Jul 22, 2014 - 11:56am
 
caching in iphone/ipad app - gtufano - Jul 22, 2014 - 11:39am
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - helenofjoy - Jul 22, 2014 - 11:36am
 
• • • What Makes You Happy? • • •  - Alexandra - Jul 22, 2014 - 11:28am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - lily34 - Jul 22, 2014 - 11:06am
 
Environment - Red_Dragon - Jul 22, 2014 - 10:31am
 
OBAMACARE - sirdroseph - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:40am
 
Maps • Google • GeoGuessr - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:36am
 
Counting with Pictures - ZM_Herb - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:17am
 
Today in History - RichardPrins - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:11am
 
Where's The Fence ? - kurtster - Jul 22, 2014 - 9:11am
 
Sweet horrible irony. - lily34 - Jul 22, 2014 - 8:56am
 
Bolivia - cc_rider - Jul 22, 2014 - 8:24am
 
Calling all Monty Python fans! - javahnagila - Jul 22, 2014 - 8:24am
 
Cryptic Posts - Leave Them Guessing - Proclivities - Jul 22, 2014 - 8:19am
 
Texts you shouldn't have sent - Proclivities - Jul 22, 2014 - 7:20am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - miamizsun - Jul 22, 2014 - 7:18am
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - Jul 22, 2014 - 7:12am
 
Palestine - RichardPrins - Jul 22, 2014 - 6:38am
 
Geomorphology - kurtster - Jul 22, 2014 - 3:18am
 
For Jrzy! - bokey - Jul 21, 2014 - 6:21pm
 
Upcoming concerts or shows you can't wait to see - expertTexpert - Jul 21, 2014 - 6:06pm
 
Konono N°1 - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 21, 2014 - 6:02pm
 
Is there any GOOD news out there? - haresfur - Jul 21, 2014 - 5:18pm
 
Little known information...maybe even facts - ScottN - Jul 21, 2014 - 4:12pm
 
Background for a quiet dinner party - haresfur - Jul 21, 2014 - 3:46pm
 
More cuteness - 2cats - Jul 21, 2014 - 12:25pm
 
Lily34 - lily34 - Jul 21, 2014 - 11:05am
 
Google Earth - Proclivities - Jul 21, 2014 - 10:25am
 
Immigration - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 21, 2014 - 9:55am
 
PUNCHLINES - DaveInVA - Jul 21, 2014 - 9:46am
 
Pandora - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 21, 2014 - 9:36am
 
Celebrity Face Recognition - Proclivities - Jul 21, 2014 - 8:29am
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - Proclivities - Jul 21, 2014 - 8:28am
 
how do you feel right now? - miamizsun - Jul 21, 2014 - 8:25am
 
Business as Usual - RichardPrins - Jul 20, 2014 - 10:24pm
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 20, 2014 - 9:35pm
 
• • •  Where Do You Live • • •  - Prodigal_SOB - Jul 20, 2014 - 8:44pm
 
Flower Pictures - swell_sailor - Jul 20, 2014 - 7:01pm
 
What did you have for dinner? - DaveInVA - Jul 20, 2014 - 6:52pm
 
Climate Chaos - kurtster - Jul 20, 2014 - 5:17pm
 
If not RP, what are you listening to right now? - Red_Dragon - Jul 20, 2014 - 5:13pm
 
Holy Frack! - RichardPrins - Jul 20, 2014 - 3:33pm
 
Facebook Tips - Alexandra - Jul 20, 2014 - 9:40am
 
Name My Album - javahnagila - Jul 20, 2014 - 9:28am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - Jelani - Jul 20, 2014 - 8:53am
 
What songs make you cry... - Moak - Jul 20, 2014 - 6:23am
 
Celebrity Deaths - steeler - Jul 20, 2014 - 6:04am
 
Things I Saw Today... - BlueHeronDruid - Jul 19, 2014 - 9:22pm
 
Tech & Science - RichardPrins - Jul 19, 2014 - 6:45pm
 
HALF A WORLD - haresfur - Jul 19, 2014 - 3:41pm
 
music that makes you dance with big wavy gestures - Catinka88 - Jul 19, 2014 - 2:27pm
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - oldviolin - Jul 19, 2014 - 2:22pm
 
What are you doing RIGHT NOW? - miamizsun - Jul 19, 2014 - 12:10pm
 
(a public service of RP)
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Evolution! Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 113, 114, 115  Next
Post to this Topic
ScottN
Strike three? Ump, that wasn't even close
ScottN Avatar

Location: An inch above the K/T boundary. But smth near fracking still has appeal.
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aries
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Jul 22, 2014 - 6:38pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

...
A young African elephant in Amboseli, Kenya. Photograph by João Nuno Gonçalves, National Geographic Your Shot

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Why so many? “We don’t know the real reason,” study leader Yoshihito Niimura, a molecular evolutionist at the University of Tokyo, said by email. But it’s likely related to the importance of smell to the poorly sighted African elephant in interpreting and navigating its environment.

For instance, smell is a crucial sense for the functioning of an elephant trunk, which acts like a hand as it grips food and other objects. (Related: “Elephants Use Their Trunks to Ace Intelligence Tests.”)

“They use olfaction to quest the outer world, which may drivesuperior sense of smell,” Niimura said.

“Imagine the situation (in which) we have a nose on our palm!”

Sniffing Out Genes 

...

“Want to know what is going through the mind of an elephant? I have always said: Watch the tip of its trunk.”



  I am waiting with anticipation, as the "junk" DNA in the human genome is more well understood.


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 22, 2014 - 6:03pm

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

A photo of an African Elephant in Rift Valley, Kenya
A young African elephant in Amboseli, Kenya. Photograph by João Nuno Gonçalves, National Geographic Your Shot

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Why so many? “We don’t know the real reason,” study leader Yoshihito Niimura, a molecular evolutionist at the University of Tokyo, said by email. But it’s likely related to the importance of smell to the poorly sighted African elephant in interpreting and navigating its environment.

For instance, smell is a crucial sense for the functioning of an elephant trunk, which acts like a hand as it grips food and other objects. (Related: “Elephants Use Their Trunks to Ace Intelligence Tests.”)

“They use olfaction to quest the outer world, which may drivesuperior sense of smell,” Niimura said.

“Imagine the situation (in which) we have a nose on our palm!”

Sniffing Out Genes 

The team wanted to discern smell-related genes for as many species as possible, but very accurate genome information is available for only 13 mammal species, he said.

The team ran a special computer program that identified the elephant’s 2,000 olfactory genes. In doing so, they also wanted to get a better understanding of the function of these genes.

Their analysis revealed that over the course of evolution, one ancient gene dedicated to smell has created as many as 84 additional genes that the animals likely use to detect odors specific to their environment—for instance, the smell of certain foods on the savanna. (Get a genetics overview.)

“On the other hand, some other genes are evolutionarily very stable, without any change in number and with very few changes in sequence. These genes (are likely) very important for the survival of any mammal,” said Niimura.

He also emphasized that research on olfactory genes is still limited, and that another species—say, the Asian elephant—could very well break the African elephant’s record.

Superior Smellers

Overall, though, his research supports behavioral studies that show African elephants have an incredible nose for detecting odors.

For instance, studies have revealed that African elephants can distinguish between the scents of two ethnic groups in Kenya: the Maasai and the Kamba. (Related: “Elephants Know How Dangerous We Are From How We Speak.”)

“Maasai men spear elephants to show their virility, while Kamba people are agricultural and give little threat to them; therefore, elephants are afraid of Maasai men,” he said.

Joyce Poole, co-founder of the conservation group ElephantVoices, also referenced this ability of elephants to distinguish between tribes.

“This is a fascinating study that confirms what we have observed in the field,” Poole, also a National Geographic explorer, said by email. (See National Geographic’s elephant pictures.)

“If the wind is blowing in the correct direction, elephants can pick up the scent of humans … from over a kilometer away or detect and find the exact location of a tiny sliver of banana from over 50 meters away,” she said.

In addition, “experimental studies show that by sniffing urine-soaked soil, elephants can discriminate between and keep track of the location of family members.

“Want to know what is going through the mind of an elephant? I have always said: Watch the tip of its trunk.”


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 17, 2014 - 11:20am

The New Science of Evolutionary Forecasting
Newly discovered patterns in evolution may help scientists make accurate short-term predictions.
Brain of world's first known predators discovered

At right, a nearly complete specimen of the Cambrian anomalocaridid Lyrarapax ungusipinus, from the Chengjiang biota, China. The three images at the left depict traces of neural structures in the head, including the brain. These are highlighted with a blue digital filter that cancels colours except for dark neural regions (top left image), shown as carbon-rich domains by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (centre left image), and with oblique lighting (lower left image). Credit: Peiyun Cong and co-authors

An international team of paleontologists has identified the exquisitely preserved brain in the fossil of one of the world's first known predators that lived in the Lower Cambrian, about 520 million years ago. The discovery revealed a brain that is surprisingly simple and less complex than those known from fossils of some of the animal's prey.

The find for the first time identifies the fossilized brain of what are considered the top predators of their time, a group of animals known as anomalocaridids, which translates to "abnormal shrimp." Long extinct, these fierce-looking arthropods were first discovered as fossils in the late 19th century but not properly identified until the early 1980s. They still have scientists arguing over where they belong in the tree of life.

"Our discovery helps to clarify this debate," said Nicholas Strausfeld, director of the University of Arizona's Center for Insect Science. "It turns out the top predator of the Cambrian had a brain that was much less complex than that of some of its possible prey and that looked surprisingly similar to a modern group of rather modest worm-like animals."

Strausfeld, a Regents' Professor in the Department of Neuroscience in the UA College of Science is senior author on a paper about the findings, which is scheduled for advance online publication on Nature website on July 16.

The brain in the fossil, a new species given the name Lyrarapax unguispinus – Latin for "spiny-clawed lyre-shaped predator" – suggests its relationship to a branch of animals whose living descendants are known as onychophorans or velvet worms. These wormlike animals are equipped with stubby unjointed legs that end in a pair of tiny claws.

Onychophorans, which are also exclusively predators, grow to no more than a few inches in length and are mostly found in the Southern Hemisphere, where they roam the undergrowth and leaf litter in search of beetles and other small insects, their preferred prey. Two long feelers extend from the head, attached in front of a pair of small eyes.

The anomalocaridid fossil resembles the neuroanatomy of today's onychophorans in several ways, according to Strausfeld and his collaborators. Onychophorans have a simple brain located in front of the mouth and a pair of ganglia – a collection of nerve cells – located in the front of the optic nerve and at the base of their long feelers. (...)




RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 15, 2014 - 8:58pm

Why so many domesticated mammals have floppy ears

ScottN
Strike three? Ump, that wasn't even close
ScottN Avatar

Location: An inch above the K/T boundary. But smth near fracking still has appeal.
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aries
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Jul 12, 2014 - 7:34pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
"We're gonna make shitloads!"
 
Shitload is an internationally recognized unit of measure.  Trained and experienced researchers all know this.
KurtfromLaQuinta
My lug nuts take more torque than your import puts out
KurtfromLaQuinta Avatar

Location: Deep in the heart of South California
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Horse


Posted: Jul 12, 2014 - 4:39pm

 kurtster wrote:

Thanks for the help.  I would like to conduct the bulk of my research in Hawaii, so I would also need to calculate travel and lodging needs as well as sunblock.   5 years should be a reasonable length of time for a thorough and timely report.  Then I can apply for a new grant to study implementing my findings.

Of course, I will need plenty of assistants. 

 
Oh!
Me! Me! Me!
kurtster
ignore the kitteh behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: counting flowers on the wall ...
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 9:17pm

 haresfur wrote:

Sure.  Please include a calculation of the potential economic benefits of your study in the grant application.

 
Thanks for the help.  I would like to conduct the bulk of my research in Hawaii, so I would also need to calculate travel and lodging needs as well as sunblock.   5 years should be a reasonable length of time for a thorough and timely report.  Then I can apply for a new grant to study implementing my findings.

Of course, I will need plenty of assistants. 
ScottFromWyoming
I eat pints.
ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Pisces
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:49pm

 haresfur wrote:

Sure.  Please include a calculation of the potential economic benefits of your study in the grant application.

 
"We're gonna make shitloads!"
haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:46pm

 kurtster wrote:

I would like to do a study on the future of staplers and paper clips in the paperless workplace and the economic impact of displaced paperclip and stapler manufacturing employees.

Would a business degree suffice ? 

 
Sure.  Please include a calculation of the potential economic benefits of your study in the grant application.
kurtster
ignore the kitteh behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: counting flowers on the wall ...
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:37pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
 kurtster wrote:


Among the projects listed were:

• $375,000 for a Pentagon study of the Frisbee
• $84,000 for a study of cross-cultural love
• $70,000 to study the smell of perspiration given off by
   Australian aborigines
• $5,000 to the author of the one one-word poem—”Light”
• $20,000 to study the blood groups of Polish Zlotnika pigs
• $5,000 for an analysis of violin varnish

The question of course is are those degrees relevant to the mentioned fields...

As for the amounts listed, I can only offer...
Peanuts {#Mrgreen}
Small fries {#Cheesygrin}

 
I would like to do a study on the future of staplers and paper clips in the paperless workplace and the economic impact of displaced paperclip and stapler manufacturing employees.

Would a business degree suffice ? 
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:21pm

 haresfur wrote:
What's facile is saying that genes determine chimp intelligence. I mean, if they didn't then amoebae would be as intelligent (or intelligent in the same way) as primates. And since intelligence is largely the ability to learn, it certainly can't be just a learned ability (although the question of how much you can be trained in how to learn is an interesting sideline).

So yeah, the headline finding is trivial.  Probably the more important part of the research is that they have developed some methods to characterise the relationship between gene expression and intelligence in Chimpanzees that will likely lead to an improved understanding of those factors in primates, given future funding. Nothing wrong with that, but not exactly earth-shaking IMO.

And people who don't accept intelligence in other animals are of as little scientific merit as the people who don't accept the currency of climate change.  However, I do agree that the behaviorists need to get their act together to address the bias against the obviously fuzzy continuum between animal and human intelligence that seems to have persisted in their field for generations.

Yeah, I did know all of that, too.

See, you can do it if you make an effort... {#Mrgreen}
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:19pm

 kurtster wrote:

 {#Mrgreen}

Hmmm.  Qualifications ...  I do have two real degrees from two real schools and still paying student loans while on Social Security.

Why not go for a grant.  Hell, our Congress has spent $375,000  bucks for studying Frisbees.

My favorite is the one word poem ...
 

President Pierce-Martin Condemns NSF Grant To Study Sex Life of Polish Frogs

Today Peter Croft Pierce-Martin, President of the Acme Wire
and Spring Corporation in Dallas, Texas, and his seventy-two
employees sent the President and the National Science Foundation
an open letter. “We at Acme Wire and Spring object to our hard
earned tax dollars being squandered on studies of the sex lives of
Polish frogs, why kids fall off tricycles, and such.”
President Pierce-Martin pointed out that last year the Acme
Corporation and its employees paid $2.82 million in taxes. He then
went on to list NSF and NIMH grants, totaling exactly that amount.

Among the projects listed were:

• $375,000 for a Pentagon study of the Frisbee
• $84,000 for a study of cross-cultural love
• $70,000 to study the smell of perspiration given off by
   Australian aborigines
• $5,000 to the author of the one one-word poem—”Light”
• $20,000 to study the blood groups of Polish Zlotnika pigs
• $5,000 for an analysis of violin varnish

The question of course is are those degrees relevant to the mentioned fields...

As for the amounts listed, I can only offer...
Peanuts {#Mrgreen}
Small fries {#Cheesygrin}
haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:18pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

So facile. It's obvious to you. There's no shortage of people who neither accept "intelligence" (let alone understand what that might actually mean or how it exactly works/should be defined) in other animals, nor this process called evolution. Also there's the long-standing discussion between various camps to which degree nature vs. nurture plays a role in such a thing as "intelligence".

And the source site mostly republishes press releases of studies that appear in journals (which tend to be behind pay-walls). The former are usually written by PR people.

But no doubt you already knew all of that too... {#Wink}


 
What's facile is saying that genes determine chimp intelligence. I mean, if they didn't then amoebae would be as intelligent (or intelligent in the same way) as primates. And since intelligence is largely the ability to learn, it certainly can't be just a learned ability (although the question of how much you can be trained in how to learn is an interesting sideline).

So yeah, the headline finding is trivial.  Probably the more important part of the research is that they have developed some methods to characterise the relationship between gene expression and intelligence in Chimpanzees that will likely lead to an improved understanding of those factors in primates, given future funding. Nothing wrong with that, but not exactly earth-shaking IMO.

And people who don't accept intelligence in other animals are of as little scientific merit as the people who don't accept the currency of climate change.  However, I do agree that the behaviorists need to get their act together to address the bias against the obviously fuzzy continuum between animal and human intelligence that seems to have persisted in their field for generations.

Yeah, I did know all of that, too. 
kurtster
ignore the kitteh behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: counting flowers on the wall ...
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 8:04pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

Damn those 50-cent (foreign) words. {#Mrgreen}

See the beginning of Chapter 3 about grants and qualifications... {#Wink}

I'll believe it when you actually land a grant to study in either scientific field (and thereby accepting government money). Not holding my breath though...

 
 {#Mrgreen}

Hmmm.  Qualifications ...  I do have two real degrees from two real schools and still paying student loans while on Social Security.

Why not go for a grant.  Hell, our Congress has spent $375,000  bucks for studying Frisbees.

My favorite is the one word poem ...
 

President Pierce-Martin Condemns NSF Grant To Study Sex Life of Polish Frogs

Today Peter Croft Pierce-Martin, President of the Acme Wire
and Spring Corporation in Dallas, Texas, and his seventy-two
employees sent the President and the National Science Foundation
an open letter. “We at Acme Wire and Spring object to our hard
earned tax dollars being squandered on studies of the sex lives of
Polish frogs, why kids fall off tricycles, and such.”
President Pierce-Martin pointed out that last year the Acme
Corporation and its employees paid $2.82 million in taxes. He then
went on to list NSF and NIMH grants, totaling exactly that amount.

Among the projects listed were:

• $375,000 for a Pentagon study of the Frisbee
• $84,000 for a study of cross-cultural love
• $70,000 to study the smell of perspiration given off by
   Australian aborigines
• $5,000 to the author of the one one-word poem—”Light”
• $20,000 to study the blood groups of Polish Zlotnika pigs
• $5,000 for an analysis of violin varnish




RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 7:13pm

 kurtster wrote:
Au contraire ...
 
Damn those 50-cent (foreign) words. {#Mrgreen}

See the beginning of Chapter 3 about grants and qualifications... {#Wink}

I'll believe it when you actually land a grant to study in either scientific field (and thereby accepting government money). Not holding my breath though...
kurtster
ignore the kitteh behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: counting flowers on the wall ...
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 6:50pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

Or you could study climate change and evolution, instead of denying the obvious... {#Mrgreen}
(though I suspect you lack the qualifications for a grant)

 
Au contrare ...

 
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 6:30pm

 kurtster wrote:
and in an effort to secure future funding grants to pursue studying the obvious and unnecessary and avoid real meaningful work to put food on the table.

Maybe I could get a grant to study why the sun rises in the East.  {#Think}
 
Or you could study climate change and evolution, instead of denying the obvious... {#Mrgreen}
(though I suspect you lack the qualifications for a grant)
kurtster
ignore the kitteh behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: counting flowers on the wall ...
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 6:21pm

 haresfur wrote:

Aka researching the obvious (and how to write press releases to make your work seem important)

 
and in an effort to secure future funding grants to pursue studying the obvious and unnecessary and avoid real meaningful work to put food on the table.

Maybe I could get a grant to study why the sun rises in the East.  {#Think} 
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 4:47pm

 haresfur wrote:
Aka researching the obvious (and how to write press releases to make your work seem important)
 
So facile. It's obvious to you. There's no shortage of people who neither accept "intelligence" (let alone understand what that might actually mean or how it exactly works/should be defined) in other animals, nor this process called evolution. Also there's the long-standing discussion between various camps to which degree nature vs. nurture plays a role in such a thing as "intelligence".

And the source site mostly republishes press releases of studies that appear in journals (which tend to be behind pay-walls). The former are usually written by PR people.

But no doubt you already knew all of that too... {#Wink}


Some Chimps Are Putting Grass in Their Ears—For No Particular Reason
Some chimp are creating their own "ear accoutrements," perhaps the animal equivalent of a fashion statement.

haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 10, 2014 - 4:17pm

 RichardPrins wrote: 
Aka researching the obvious (and how to write press releases to make your work seem important)
Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 113, 114, 115  Next