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What Are You Going To Do Today? - BlueHeronDruid - May 29, 2017 - 8:15pm
 
Name My President - Dragonfly_Launch - May 29, 2017 - 6:59pm
 
Memorial Day - Dragonfly_Launch - May 29, 2017 - 5:39pm
 
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What are you listening to now? - Dragonfly_Launch - May 29, 2017 - 2:46pm
 
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how do you feel right now? - Antigone - May 28, 2017 - 7:02pm
 
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HALF A WORLD - Red_Dragon - May 27, 2017 - 5:10pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - May 27, 2017 - 4:31pm
 
Web Series - rhahl - May 27, 2017 - 3:31pm
 
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TV shows you watch - oldviolin - May 27, 2017 - 6:51am
 
The Obituary Page - Red_Dragon - May 27, 2017 - 4:36am
 
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That's good advice - kurtster - May 26, 2017 - 9:48pm
 
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• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - Red_Dragon - May 26, 2017 - 10:30am
 
Derplahoma Questions and Points of Interest - Red_Dragon - May 26, 2017 - 10:03am
 
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May '12 Photo Theme: Blue - Proclivities - May 26, 2017 - 7:11am
 
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Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - aflanigan - May 25, 2017 - 6:41am
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Other Medical Stuff Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 44, 45, 46  Next
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meower

meower Avatar

Location: i believe, i believe, it's silly, but I believe
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Gemini


Posted: May 3, 2017 - 10:45am

Hoopla, here anyway. The thing that you sign when you say that you know your rights under HIPPA here says that you agree that your insurance company can talk to your doc/review your records

 


JrzyTmata
You say tomato, I say "Hi Charlie!"
JrzyTmata Avatar



Posted: May 3, 2017 - 10:45am

 Red_Dragon wrote:
Is this for real, or just interweb hoohaa?

 

 
SNOPES says mixed truth/false
Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: May 3, 2017 - 10:35am

Is this for real, or just interweb hoohaa?

 
kurtster
behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 1:48pm

 triskele wrote:
*long post*

 
Hoping you get relief.  I have sort of the opposite situation.  I get testosterone shots every other week.  Next month is the 8th anniversary of my transplant, which wiped out any ability to produce testosterone naturally.  IIRC, its been 6 years of these shots which have wrecked havoc on my soft tissues as well.  I used to have the shots alternated between shoulders, but after about 3 or so years I suddenly got what we all thought was tennis elbow.  We eliminated that as a possibility and concluded it was the shots.  Since then I now have them from left to right shoulder and then left hip to right hip and that's the pattern.  The tennis elbow stopped went away after a few months and life was good again.  Now in the past couple of years, I'm getting these pains and cramps in my ribs and legs.  The ribs hurt like when you hold your jaw open too long and happen when I twist in a funny way.  The leg cramps are getting so bad that I will wake up screaming in the middle of the night and getting up and standing does not do a damn thing and it lasts for a half an hour now.  I have tried boosting my potassium intake and that seems to give me some relief.  Its still not resolved and the bouts are more frequent.

Its the long term stuff you have to deal with afterwards.  When you're told your terminal, you don't worry about what's left of you until you get there, if you get there.  Pain sucks, period.  But you're doing for you what you have to do by talking to the various people about the different meds you're dealing with and informing and questioning the others.  Surviving this stuff after the primary treatments is not a passive event, ever.   I'm pulling for you.

{#Cheers}  {#Hug}


triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Taurus
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 8:56am

 JrzyTmata wrote:

You're lucky your doctor actually listened to you. Most just say stay off the internet.
Keep fighting!

 
This is one reason I love my doctor.  He agreed that the faslodex was probably causing the issues, but he hadn't been aware that the OTHER drug I was on was studied with the same chemo pill...so he learned something from me, and said so.  
JrzyTmata
You say tomato, I say "Hi Charlie!"
JrzyTmata Avatar



Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 8:36am

 triskele wrote:
*long post*

Here's hoping that the positive effects of the cortisone, which have started to be noticeable, will be complete and permanent this time!!  

 EDIT:  Maybe I can play my guitar again soon!!!!!!

 
You're lucky your doctor actually listened to you. Most just say stay off the internet.
Keep fighting!
SeriousLee

SeriousLee Avatar

Location: Dans l'milieu d'deux milles livres


Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 7:59am

 triskele wrote:
*long post*

Many breast cancer patients who survive past major treatment, yet require ongoing maintenance treatment, are given hormone blocking medications.

This is because some types of breast cancer are hormone reactive.  My types (there were two) were hormone reactive, so I have been on hormone blockers now for a year.

Unfortunately, the hormone blocker alone proved inadequate after 6 months off of chemo (the cancer in the liver woke up again), so chemo was added back as a "lighter" oral pill.  There are far fewer side effects from this type of chemo, yet is has been shown to prevent the spread of cancer cells.

So...in October, in conjunction with the introduction of the new chemo pill, the hormone blocker was changed from a pill, to a different drug administered by injection, which studies had shown to have a high survival success rate.

Yes, we were back in survival war again.

After a couple of months on that regime, SOMETHING started wreaking havoc with my soft tissue, causing awful muscle spasming in my legs and feet, and tendon pain and damage in my hands and wrists.

I have not been able to do any massage therapy for months because of the pain, and had lost my ability to do almost ANY task at all without suffering pain.  Think about all of the things you do with your hands....even the small things.  Yeah.

I got cortisone shots in December, but the effects were temporary.

In the meantime, however, I did some research, and found lots of evidence that the injectable hormone blocking drug was almost assuredly the cause of these life-disrupting side effects.

Then, there was also the fact that the monthly phone calls I have to make to the chemo drug company always involved them asking me if I was being treated with the injectable hormone blocking drug, OR with the oral drug that I USED TO TAKE.

The next time I saw my doctor (January), I explained to him that the leg and foot cramping, and the wrist pain, were unacceptable.  

He was looking like he was going to put me back on IV chemo, when I told him that I had done some research, and had found that the injection drug was PROBABLY causing my issues, AND I told him about how the chemo drug company was always asking me about which "companion" drug I was being treated with. 

I asked if it was possible to just switch the hormone blocker.

He rubbed his chin, then left the exam room.  He went to his computer, and verified that the studies done with the first hormone blocker were just as successful (though done on fewer patients) as the studies done with the injectable drug...... so he took me OFF of the injection, and put me back on the first drug!

The muscle cramping stopped a few days after the injectable drug was out of my system.  I've been able to sleep through most nights without one cramp!

Unfortunately, however, the wrist pain continued, and worsened, to the point of my not being able to use my hands for ANYTHING without pain, sometimes bringing me to tears.

I put a call in to the orthopedist, and explained what was going on.  I explained that the drug that started this has been removed from my protocol, and was now three months out of my system....and that my hope was that he would agree to do more cortisone injections before we started talking about surgical intervention.

I had my cortisone shots on Thursday.  They were incredibly painful. Worse than the ones in December. I made it through the process itself without crying, but when I got in the car, I burst into tears.  The pain was mind blowing.  Not as bad as my biopsies, but BAD.

By the next morning, though, I could feel a difference, and by last night, I was able to go grocery shopping and not drop anything, and was able to reach around and scratch my own back!!!

Here's hoping that the positive effects of the cortisone, which have started to be noticeable, will be complete and permanent this time!!  

 EDIT:  Maybe I can play my guitar again soon!!!!!!

 
Phew! You've sure been through a lot. Keep your head up high and play that guitar strong! {#Good-vibes}
Coaxial
I see what you did there.
Coaxial Avatar

Location: 543 miles west of Paradis,1491 miles east of Paradise
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Capricorn
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 7:48am

{#Meditate}{#Pray}{#Meditate}{#Arrowd}
triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Taurus
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Mar 11, 2017 - 7:43am

*long post*

Many breast cancer patients who survive past major treatment, yet require ongoing maintenance treatment, are given hormone blocking medications.

This is because some types of breast cancer are hormone reactive.  My types (there were two) were hormone reactive, so I have been on hormone blockers now for a year.

Unfortunately, the hormone blocker alone proved inadequate after 6 months off of chemo (the cancer in the liver woke up again), so chemo was added back as a "lighter" oral pill.  There are far fewer side effects from this type of chemo, yet is has been shown to prevent the spread of cancer cells.

So...in October, in conjunction with the introduction of the new chemo pill, the hormone blocker was changed from a pill, to a different drug administered by injection, which studies had shown to have a high survival success rate.

Yes, we were back in survival war again.

After a couple of months on that regime, SOMETHING started wreaking havoc with my soft tissue, causing awful muscle spasming in my legs and feet, and tendon pain and damage in my hands and wrists.

I have not been able to do any massage therapy for months because of the pain, and had lost my ability to do almost ANY task at all without suffering pain.  Think about all of the things you do with your hands....even the small things.  Yeah.

I got cortisone shots in December, but the effects were temporary.

In the meantime, however, I did some research, and found lots of evidence that the injectable hormone blocking drug was almost assuredly the cause of these life-disrupting side effects.

Then, there was also the fact that the monthly phone calls I have to make to the chemo drug company always involved them asking me if I was being treated with the injectable hormone blocking drug, OR with the oral drug that I USED TO TAKE.

The next time I saw my doctor (January), I explained to him that the leg and foot cramping, and the wrist pain, were unacceptable.  

He was looking like he was going to put me back on IV chemo, when I told him that I had done some research, and had found that the injection drug was PROBABLY causing my issues, AND I told him about how the chemo drug company was always asking me about which "companion" drug I was being treated with. 

I asked if it was possible to just switch the hormone blocker.

He rubbed his chin, then left the exam room.  He went to his computer, and verified that the studies done with the first hormone blocker were just as successful (though done on fewer patients) as the studies done with the injectable drug...... so he took me OFF of the injection, and put me back on the first drug!

I did NOT get the injections that day, and went home and pulled the bottle of pills out of the back of the cabinet and started on them again.

The muscle cramping stopped a few days after the injectable drug was out of my system.  I've been able to sleep through most nights without one cramp!

Unfortunately, however, the wrist pain continued, and worsened, to the point of my not being able to use my hands for ANYTHING without pain, sometimes bringing me to tears.

I put a call in to the orthopedist, and explained what was going on.  I explained that the drug that started this has been removed from my protocol, and was now three months out of my system....and that my hope was that he would agree to do more cortisone injections before we started talking about surgical intervention.

I had my cortisone shots on Thursday.  They were incredibly painful. Worse than the ones in December. I made it through the process itself without crying, but when I got in the car, I burst into tears.  The pain was mind blowing.  Not as bad as my biopsies, but BAD.

By the next morning, though, I could feel a difference, and by last night, I was able to go grocery shopping and not drop anything, and was able to reach around and scratch my own back!!!

Here's hoping that the positive effects of the cortisone, which have started to be noticeable, will be complete and permanent this time!!  

 EDIT:  Maybe I can play my guitar again soon!!!!!!


Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 12:46pm

 Antigone wrote:

HUH?? {#Stupid}

 
Never mind, I used my Google finger.


Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 12:24pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

That's good, but at the same time, someone who's done thousands might not be so interested in fixing what ain't broke. I tried to find something more current that has better results; but that's not the case here. All systems go! IANAD.

 
HUH?? {#Stupid}
ScottFromWyoming
I eat pints
ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Pisces
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 7:54am

 Antigone wrote:

And my doctor has done (as he put it) thousands of this procedure. That doesn't mean I am not scared/anxious about it but ...

 
That's good, but at the same time, someone who's done thousands might not be so interested in fixing what ain't broke. I tried to find something more current that has better results; but that's not the case here. All systems go! IANAD.
Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 7:39am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

Of the options listed, the LRTI seems to be the way to go. Other things I found all agree.

 
And my doctor has done (as he put it) thousands of this procedure. That doesn't mean I am not scared/anxious about it but ...
ScottFromWyoming
I eat pints
ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Pisces
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 7:36am

 Antigone wrote:

Ligament Reconstruction and Tendon Interposition (LRTI)

In use for more than 40 years, LRTI is the most commonly performed surgery for thumb arthritis. The arthritic joint surfaces are removed and replaced with a cushion of tissue that keeps the bones separated. To accomplish this, surgeons remove all or part of the trapezium bone in the wrist.

A nearby tendon is detached at one end and then passed through a hole drilled in the thumb metacarpal. The remaining tendon is rolled like an anchovy and placed into the space where the bone was removed. Surgeons can also use artificial “anchovies” that eliminate the need to move a tendon.

Who can benefit: Adults with moderate to severe arthritis with pain and difficulty pinching or gripping.

Pros: Removing the entire trapezium eliminates the possibility of arthritis returning, and, according to Dr. Ruch, LRTI has a 96 percent success rate. “Most patients achieve complete pain relief and mobility equal to that of a healthy thumb, with results lasting at least 15 to 20 years,” he says.

Cons: LRTI has a lengthy and sometimes painful recovery and rehabilitation period, including at least four weeks of wearing a thumb cast. Patients also may experience decreased pinch strength, making it difficult to grasp and hold objects. LRTI also noticeably shortens the thumb. When the entire trapezium is removed, there are few repair options if symptoms persist after surgery.

 

From this site.

 
Of the options listed, the LRTI seems to be the way to go. Other things I found all agree.
Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Mar 9, 2017 - 6:24am

Ligament Reconstruction and Tendon Interposition (LRTI)

In use for more than 40 years, LRTI is the most commonly performed surgery for thumb arthritis. The arthritic joint surfaces are removed and replaced with a cushion of tissue that keeps the bones separated. To accomplish this, surgeons remove all or part of the trapezium bone in the wrist.

A nearby tendon is detached at one end and then passed through a hole drilled in the thumb metacarpal. The remaining tendon is rolled like an anchovy and placed into the space where the bone was removed. Surgeons can also use artificial “anchovies” that eliminate the need to move a tendon.

Who can benefit: Adults with moderate to severe arthritis with pain and difficulty pinching or gripping.

Pros: Removing the entire trapezium eliminates the possibility of arthritis returning, and, according to Dr. Ruch, LRTI has a 96 percent success rate. “Most patients achieve complete pain relief and mobility equal to that of a healthy thumb, with results lasting at least 15 to 20 years,” he says.

Cons: LRTI has a lengthy and sometimes painful recovery and rehabilitation period, including at least four weeks of wearing a thumb cast. Patients also may experience decreased pinch strength, making it difficult to grasp and hold objects. LRTI also noticeably shortens the thumb. When the entire trapezium is removed, there are few repair options if symptoms persist after surgery.

 

From this site.




kcar

kcar Avatar



Posted: Feb 22, 2017 - 7:10pm

 DaveInVA wrote:
 Some details:
This started about 20 years ago when I had an arterial spasm likely caused by the job stress I was under at the time. The Doc called the arterial spasm a small stroke. It was like crimping a garden hose and releasing it resulting in a momentary high bp in the small vessels feeding the retinas in my eyes. This blew out hundreds of them causing leaks. The vision damage was immediately noticeable in both eyes at the same time. These vessels are to small for red corpuscles to fit through so scabs can't form to seal them. The plasma leaks contain high protein which over time causes the layers of the retina to delaminate and separate causing permanent vision problems and making the eyes very fragile. Having the cataract surgery seems to have disturbed things enough to cause multiple delaminations to occur in both eyes. This would have happened sooner or later anyways but it might have been years later. The Doc held off doing the cataract surgery until after a full year of no noticeable activity occurred hoping it would be stable enough to take the abuse of the surgery.
I'd be open to about anything. Usually they use laser cauterization to seal the leaks before more damage happens but every time they fire the laser it causes small dead spots so its only practical if you only have a few leaks and not hundreds.

 

Wow. Dave, I had no idea you were dealing with this. Miamizsun's link might be very helpful: I know a lot of research is being done on diseases of the eye that affect the retina, including retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. 

I don't know if either of these links would help you but I hope they give you some leads and some hope:

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602625/gene-therapy-in-us-is-on-track-for-approval-as-early-as-next-year/

 " Spark Therapeutics is within striking distance of a landmark green light from the FDA for its treatment for certain forms of blindness, known as inherited retinal dystrophies."


https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603561/companies-plan-tests-of-optogenetic-goggles-to-restore-sight/

"Two startup companies say they plan to start clinical trials to treat blindness by combining an emerging technology called optogenetics with high-tech goggles that can beam light into the eye.

The companies, GenSight Biologics of Paris and Bionic Sight, a startup out of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, both say a combination of wearable electronics and gene therapy has a chance to restore vision by re-creating the retina’s ability to sense light.

Both companies are aiming to help patients with a degenerative eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa, which destroys light-sensing cells in the retina. If the approach works, it could in theory be used to treat any type of retinal disease that involves the loss of these cells, called photoreceptors."





kurtster
behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Feb 22, 2017 - 6:39pm

One of the worst things that could have happened to the eyeglass bizness is well underway.

The Luxottica Essilor Mega-Merger: Company Overviews

We, in the industry have been dreading this for many years.  Now the largest lens company in the world is merging with the largest frame company in the world, which also owns one of the largest eye insurance plans in the US, Eyemed.  This may be the fatal blow to small independent operations.  How do you compete with the company that now makes both the frames and lenses that you sell and has their own stores and in house insurance company ?  The other larger US insurance outfit VSP now also has its own lenses, frames and stores.

Rollerball has arrived to my profession ... sigh ... glad I'm old ... sigh ... the consumer will lose, too. 
kurtster
behind the kurtain
kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Libra
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 31, 2016 - 8:51am

 miamizsun wrote:

dave i'd contact this organization

http://www.blindness.org/blog/index.php/category/research/stem-cell/

you may qualify for study or treatment

especially if you're an extreme case

regards

 
Bookmarked !

That is really cool and good to know for what I do.  Anything Gordon Gund is associated with is the real deal.  A hometown hero as the former long term owner of the Cavs.  His is a great story in itself.
DaveInVA
Single, unwanted, unloved eccentric, crusty ol' fart with cats
DaveInVA Avatar

Location: In a hovel in effluent Damnville, VA
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 31, 2016 - 8:33am

 miamizsun wrote:

dave i'd contact this organization

http://www.blindness.org/blog/index.php/category/research/stem-cell/

you may qualify for study or treatment

especially if you're an extreme case

regards

 
Thanks, I will definitely check them out....
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 31, 2016 - 8:29am

 DaveInVA wrote:
 Some details:
This started about 20 years ago when I had an arterial spasm likely caused by the job stress I was under at the time. The Doc called the arterial spasm a small stroke. It was like crimping a garden hose and releasing it resulting in a momentary high bp in the small vessels feeding the retinas in my eyes. This blew out hundreds of them causing leaks. The vision damage was immediately noticeable in both eyes at the same time. These vessels are to small for red corpuscles to fit through so scabs can't form to seal them. The plasma leaks contain high protein which over time causes the layers of the retina to delaminate and separate causing permanent vision problems and making the eyes very fragile. Having the cataract surgery seems to have disturbed things enough to cause multiple delaminations to occur in both eyes. This would have happened sooner or later anyways but it might have been years later. The Doc held off doing the cataract surgery until after a full year of no noticeable activity occurred hoping it would be stable enough to take the abuse of the surgery.
I'd be open to about anything. Usually they use laser cauterization to seal the leaks before more damage happens but every time they fire the laser it causes small dead spots so its only practical if you only have a few leaks and not hundreds.

 
dave i'd contact this organization

http://www.blindness.org/blog/index.php/category/research/stem-cell/

you may qualify for study or treatment

especially if you're an extreme case

regards
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