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OUR CATS!! - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:55am
 
NEED A COMPUTER GEEK! - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:53am
 
Are you ready for some football? - miamizsun - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:49am
 
I don't know what to call this but I found it and it's funny - miamizsun - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:41am
 
The Dragons' Roost - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:32am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - lily34 - Jan 30, 2015 - 5:25am
 
MICHELLE OBAMA - sirdroseph - Jan 30, 2015 - 4:29am
 
Counting with Pictures - latrippa - Jan 30, 2015 - 3:23am
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos; Please Limit to 510 ... - fractalv - Jan 29, 2015 - 11:24pm
 
Post a photo of yourself as a kid - Rod - Jan 29, 2015 - 10:17pm
 
If not RP, what are you listening to right now? - kurtster - Jan 29, 2015 - 9:07pm
 
stupid thread recall - Alexandra - Jan 29, 2015 - 6:16pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - BillG - Jan 29, 2015 - 5:46pm
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - bokey - Jan 29, 2015 - 5:39pm
 
Dance with me - JrzyTmata - Jan 29, 2015 - 5:33pm
 
Public Messages in a Private Forum - MsJudi - Jan 29, 2015 - 5:13pm
 
Fix My Car - DaveInVA - Jan 29, 2015 - 5:02pm
 
Celebrity Deaths - ScottN - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:55pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - RichardPrins - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:47pm
 
Bible Verse of the Day - RichardPrins - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:37pm
 
Why, it was one of the strangest things I ever saw: - Red_Dragon - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:15pm
 
Questions. - buzz - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:09pm
 
Classical Music - miamizsun - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:01pm
 
Photos you haven't taken of yourself - oldviolin - Jan 29, 2015 - 3:32pm
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - oldviolin - Jan 29, 2015 - 3:24pm
 
Old Family Photos - BlueHeronDruid - Jan 29, 2015 - 3:08pm
 
The Rpeeps Favorite Guitarists Thread - MsJudi - Jan 29, 2015 - 2:40pm
 
Magic Eye optical Illusions - oldviolin - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:56pm
 
Drones - RichardPrins - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:42pm
 
What Makes You Laugh? - K_Love - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:38pm
 
Web hosting - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:38pm
 
Afghanistan - RichardPrins - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:23pm
 
Best Song Comments. - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:23pm
 
What's on YOUR PSD right now ? - Beaker - Jan 29, 2015 - 1:01pm
 
Economix - kurtster - Jan 29, 2015 - 12:32pm
 
What is Humanity's best invention? - bokey - Jan 29, 2015 - 12:26pm
 
I have no idea what this thread was about, but let's talk... - Proclivities - Jan 29, 2015 - 12:14pm
 
Make Lily34 Laugh - lily34 - Jan 29, 2015 - 11:47am
 
Things You Thought Today - lily34 - Jan 29, 2015 - 11:27am
 
Lyrics - Proclivities - Jan 29, 2015 - 10:37am
 
First World Problems - bokey - Jan 29, 2015 - 9:50am
 
Name My Band - buzz - Jan 29, 2015 - 9:32am
 
Celebrity Face Recognition - Alexandra - Jan 29, 2015 - 9:21am
 
Meetup Meetup (Announcements and Links only, please) - MsJudi - Jan 29, 2015 - 8:32am
 
The Burrito Chronicles - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 29, 2015 - 8:26am
 
Your Bread & Butter - Proclivities - Jan 29, 2015 - 7:54am
 
BillyGee's Greatest Segues - swell_sailor - Jan 29, 2015 - 7:50am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jan 29, 2015 - 6:20am
 
Saudi Arabia - miamizsun - Jan 29, 2015 - 4:16am
 
Animation - RichardPrins - Jan 29, 2015 - 12:39am
 
what makes you frown - BlueHeronDruid - Jan 28, 2015 - 9:58pm
 
What makes you smile? - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 28, 2015 - 9:09pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Jan 28, 2015 - 6:04pm
 
• • • Poopoo • • • - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 28, 2015 - 6:00pm
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - RichardPrins - Jan 28, 2015 - 5:56pm
 
Triskele and The Grateful Dead - Red_Dragon - Jan 28, 2015 - 5:19pm
 
The War On Drugs = Fail - haresfur - Jan 28, 2015 - 2:23pm
 
(Big) Media Watch - RichardPrins - Jan 28, 2015 - 12:45pm
 
Cool Stuff I Really Want - Proclivities - Jan 28, 2015 - 10:34am
 
Breaking News - Alexandra - Jan 28, 2015 - 10:15am
 
That's good advice - Coaxial - Jan 28, 2015 - 10:11am
 
The Global War on Terror - islander - Jan 28, 2015 - 8:47am
 
Enjoy in Restaurant of your Choice! - Proclivities - Jan 28, 2015 - 8:08am
 
PC-SPEAKERS - islander - Jan 28, 2015 - 7:29am
 
Those lovable acronym guys & gals - islander - Jan 28, 2015 - 7:27am
 
Overheard - miamizsun - Jan 28, 2015 - 5:25am
 
Favorite Quotes - sirdroseph - Jan 28, 2015 - 5:00am
 
• • •  What's For Dinner ? • • •  - BlueHeronDruid - Jan 27, 2015 - 8:27pm
 
Songs etc • Where do they take you? - DaveInVA - Jan 27, 2015 - 8:03pm
 
Books read recently - edieraye - Jan 27, 2015 - 5:08pm
 
How's the weather? - edieraye - Jan 27, 2015 - 5:01pm
 
Signs of Spring - edieraye - Jan 27, 2015 - 5:00pm
 
Quotations - Antigone - Jan 27, 2015 - 3:53pm
 
how do you feel right now? - haresfur - Jan 27, 2015 - 3:20pm
 
The Chomsky / Zinn Reader - RichardPrins - Jan 27, 2015 - 2:35pm
 
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islander
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Location: Seattle
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Scorpio
Chinese Yr: Cock


Posted: Jan 28, 2015 - 7:27am

 miamizsun wrote:

it's not even the war on drugs anymore

it's just the war and we're the enema

 
Irony, sarcasm or auto-correct? Don't know or care, just like. 
sirdroseph
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Location: Yes
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jan 28, 2015 - 4:38am

 miamizsun wrote:

it's not even the war on drugs anymore

it's just the war and we're the enema

 

One might even call it a "war on you".{#Wink}
miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 28, 2015 - 4:34am

 RichardPrins wrote:
The DEA Is Spying on Millions of Cars All Over the U.S. - The Atlantic

Once again, Americans face a tradeoff between liberty and security. On one hand, the Drug Enforcement Administration has been building "a database to track in real time the movement of vehicles around the U.S., a secret domestic intelligence-gathering program that scans and stores hundreds of millions of records." If you drive in populated areas your movements have very likely been tracked.

On the other hand, the result is that illegal drugs are no longer sold on U.S. streets, the price of getting high is too high for most to pay, and international drug cartels are all but gone, as are overdose deaths and street gangs that profit from narcotics.

I kid, of course—not about the huge imposition on the privacy of innocents that the federal government is perpetrating with a license plate tracking program run by the DEA, which is real, so much as the notion that the DEA will achieve success with it.

The DEA will obviously continue to lose the War on Drugs. (...)



 
it's not even the war on drugs anymore

it's just the war and we're the enema
RichardPrins
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Posted: Jan 27, 2015 - 3:24pm

The DEA Is Spying on Millions of Cars All Over the U.S. - The Atlantic

Once again, Americans face a tradeoff between liberty and security. On one hand, the Drug Enforcement Administration has been building "a database to track in real time the movement of vehicles around the U.S., a secret domestic intelligence-gathering program that scans and stores hundreds of millions of records." If you drive in populated areas your movements have very likely been tracked.

On the other hand, the result is that illegal drugs are no longer sold on U.S. streets, the price of getting high is too high for most to pay, and international drug cartels are all but gone, as are overdose deaths and street gangs that profit from narcotics.

I kid, of course—not about the huge imposition on the privacy of innocents that the federal government is perpetrating with a license plate tracking program run by the DEA, which is real, so much as the notion that the DEA will achieve success with it.

The DEA will obviously continue to lose the War on Drugs. (...)


RichardPrins
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Posted: Dec 30, 2014 - 8:00pm

US and British intelligence agencies undertake every effort imaginable to crack all types of encrypted Internet communication. The cloud, it seems, is full of holes. The good news: New Snowden documents show that some forms of encryption still cause problems for the NSA.

RichardPrins
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Posted: Dec 19, 2014 - 8:21am

Brought to You by Wikileaks: Mandela Shows Better to Kill Than Imprison
A study by the Central Intelligence Agency that evaluated the pros and cons of assassination programs has revealed significant insights into the agency’s thinking about targeted killings, including potential backlash. The study was published by Wikileaks on Thursday.

The study is titled “CIA Best Practices in Counterinsurgency” and evaluates assassination operations against the Taliban, al-Qaeda, the FARC, PLO, HAMAS and the Shining Path, among others, including those managed by other countries. (...)

"Capturing leaders may have a limited psychological impact on a group if members believe that captured leaders will eventually return to the group,” the review reads, “or if those leaders are able to maintain their influence while in government custody, as Nelson Mandela did while incarcerated in South Africa.”

Perhaps as a result of the analysis, such assassinations radically increased over the years after the publication of the 2009 booklet. The following year became “the year of the drone” with 751 people killed by UAV strikes in Pakistan alone in 2010, according to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism.

After that, however, one of the report’s prognosis seems to have come true with the radicalization of areas devastated by drone-based assassinations such as Waziristan.

“The potential negative effect of HLT (high-level targets) operations include increasing the level of insurgent support…, strengthening an armed group's bonds with the population, radicalizing an insurgent group's remaining leaders, creating a vacuum into which more radical groups can enter, and escalating or de-escalating a conflict in ways that favor the insurgents.”

RichardPrins
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Posted: Dec 17, 2014 - 11:45am

From the moment bin Laden was killed, the CIA launched a determined new campaign to convince Congress and the public that its torture program had been key to locating bin Laden - and that the agency's operations people had tracked him down by a series of operations in which one operation yielded clues that brought still others and led ultimately to Abbottabad. That campaign ultimately extended to using the popular film Zero Dark Thirty to promote the agency's justification for torture.
"Believe it or not, entertainment is part of our American diplomacy." ~ B.O.

The CIA Didn’t Just Torture, They Experimented on Human Beings | The Nation
miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 29, 2014 - 4:08am

blatant

adjective

1. brazenly obvious; flagrant:

 

fascism

noun

1. (sometimes initial capital letter) a governmental system led by a dictator having complete power, forcibly suppressing opposition and criticism, regimenting all industry, commerce, etc., and emphasizing an aggressive nationalism and often racism.

 

Verizon is launching a tech news site that bans stories on U.S. spying

 

Verizon is getting into the news business. What could go wrong?

The most-valuable, second-richest telecommunications company in the world is bankrolling a technology news site called SugarString.com. The publication, which is now hiring its first full-time editors and reporters, is meant to rival major tech websites like Wired and the Verge while bringing in a potentially giant mainstream audience to beat those competitors at their own game.

There’s just one catch: In exchange for the major corporate backing, tech reporters at SugarString are expressly forbidden from writing about American spying or net neutrality around the world, two of the biggest issues in tech and politics today.

Unsurprisingly, Verizon is deeply tangled up in both controversies.

The first revelation from Edward Snowden’s leaks showed that Verizon gave the National Security Agency (NSA) all of its customers’ phone records. Later leaks showed that virtually every other major phone and credit card company in America was doing the same thing.

Verizon has been snarled in U.S. government surveillance for years. After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, USA Today reported, Verizon gave the NSA landline phone records without customer consent or a warrant. Just this week, it was revealed that Verizon is tracking all of its wireless customers movement throughout the Web.

Verizon has also led the charge to kill net neutrality—the principle that Internet service providers, like Verizon, should treat all Internet traffic equally—earning its place as the most vocal, aggressive, and well-funded opponent the so-called open Internet movement faces.

Curiously, Verizon’s self-censorship applies only to surveillance conducted by the United States. SugarString reporters are allowed to write, and have already written about, spying in other countries. Chinese surveillance, for instance, is fair game, as made evident in this article about anonymizing hardware, which mentions Chinese dissidents who risk their lives against state surveillance.

News of Verizon’s publishing venture and its strict rules first came to light to multiple reporters through recruiting emails sent last week by author and reporter Cole Stryker, who is now the editor-in-chief of SugarString. (Stryker has also previously contributed to the Daily Dot.) I was one of the reporters who received that email. The premise and rules behind the site were explained to me in a series of messages throughout the day. I declined the job offer.

Other reporters, who asked not to be named, have confirmed that they have received the same recruiting pitch with the same rules: No articles about surveillance or net neutrality.


 


RichardPrins
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Posted: Oct 28, 2014 - 9:39pm

Der Feind meines Feindes ist mein Freund...
 
In Cold War, U.S. Spy Agencies Used 1,000 Nazis - NYTimes.com
In the decades after World War II, the C.I.A. and other United States agencies employed at least a thousand Nazis as Cold War spies and informants and, as recently as the 1990s, concealed the government’s ties to some still living in America, newly disclosed records and interviews show.

At the height of the Cold War in the 1950s, law enforcement and intelligence leaders like J. Edgar Hoover at the F.B.I. and Allen Dulles at the C.I.A. aggressively recruited onetime Nazis of all ranks as secret, anti-Soviet “assets,” declassified records show. They believed the ex-Nazis’ intelligence value against the Russians outweighed what one official called “moral lapses” in their service to the Third Reich.

And in 1994, a lawyer with the C.I.A. pressured prosecutors to drop an investigation into an ex-spy outside Boston implicated in the Nazis’ massacre of tens of thousands of Jews in Lithuania, according to a government official.

Evidence of the government’s links to Nazi spies began emerging publicly in the 1970s. But thousands of records from declassified files, Freedom of Information Act requests and other sources, together with interviews with scores of current and former government officials, show that the government’s recruitment of Nazis ran far deeper than previously known and that officials sought to conceal those ties for at least a half-century after the war.

In 1980, F.B.I. officials refused to tell even the Justice Department’s own Nazi hunters what they knew about 16 suspected Nazis living in the United States.

The bureau balked at a request from prosecutors for internal records on the Nazi suspects, memos show, because the 16 men had all worked as F.B.I. informants, providing leads on Communist “sympathizers.” Five of the men were still active informants. (...)


RichardPrins
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Posted: Oct 15, 2014 - 7:27pm

UN Report Finds Mass Surveillance Violates International Treaties and Privacy Rights - The Intercept/Greenwald
Quaint UN, treaties, and rights...
RichardPrins
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Posted: Oct 14, 2014 - 9:27pm

The Central Intelligence Agency has run guns to insurgencies across the world during its 67-year history — from Angola to Nicaragua to Cuba. The continuing C.I.A. effort to train Syrian rebels is just the latest example of an American president becoming enticed by the prospect of using the spy agency to covertly arm and train rebel groups.

An internal C.I.A. study has found that it rarely works.

The still-classified review, one of several C.I.A. studies commissioned in 2012 and 2013 in the midst of the Obama administration’s protracted debate about whether to wade into the Syrian civil war, concluded that many past attempts by the agency to arm foreign forces covertly had a minimal impact on the long-term outcome of a conflict. They were even less effective, the report found, when the militias fought without any direct American support on the ground. (...)

Do it again, but expect different results (though it is likely still profitable in the short term for some Ferengi)
miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 13, 2014 - 5:14am


RichardPrins
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Posted: Oct 11, 2014 - 11:45am


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Posted: Oct 11, 2014 - 11:10am

Second leaker in US intelligence, says Glenn Greenwald
Citizenfour, new film on spying whistleblower Edward Snowden, shows journalist Greenwald discussing other source

Edward Snowden’s Girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, Moved to Moscow to Live with Him
RichardPrins
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Posted: Oct 10, 2014 - 10:00pm

Core Secrets: NSA Saboteurs in China and Germany
By Peter Maass and Laura Poitras

The National Security Agency has had agents in China, Germany, and South Korea working on programs that use “physical subversion” to infiltrate and compromise networks and devices, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.

The documents, leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, also indicate that the agency has used “under cover” operatives to gain access to sensitive data and systems in the global communications industry, and that these secret agents may have even dealt with American firms. The documents describe a range of clandestine field activities that are among the agency’s “core secrets” when it comes to computer network attacks, details of which are apparently shared with only a small number of officials outside the NSA.

“It’s something that many people have been wondering about for a long time,” said Chris Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union, after reviewing the documents. “I’ve had conversations with executives at tech companies about this precise thing. How do you know the NSA is not sending people into your data centers?” (...)


miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 30, 2014 - 7:57am



 

Tim Berners-Lee Warns of Threat to the Internet

 

The British inventor of the World Wide Web warned on Saturday that the freedom of the Internet is under threat by governments and corporations interested in controlling the web.

Tim Berners-Lee, a computer scientist who invented the web 25 years ago, called for a bill of rights that would guarantee the independence of the Internet and ensure users' privacy.

"If a company can control your access to the Internet, if they can control which websites they go to, then they have tremendous control over your life," Berners-Lee said at the London "Web We Want" festival on the future of the Internet.

"If a Government can block you going to, for example, the opposition's political pages, then they can give you a blinkered view of reality to keep themselves in power."

"Suddenly the power to abuse the open Internet has become so tempting both for government and big companies."


RichardPrins
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Posted: Sep 15, 2014 - 6:20pm

The NSA and GCHQ Campaign Against German Satellite Companies - The Intercept
RichardPrins
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Posted: Aug 30, 2014 - 2:29pm

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can't let them make up the rules
Arjun Sethi | Commentisfree | The Guardian

facebook surveillance illustration
Red_Dragon
y ddraig goch ddyry gychwyn
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Location: Redneck Nation


Posted: Aug 29, 2014 - 6:12am

 miamizsun wrote:
got a strawberry festival?

you need a tank! {#Lol}



 


Strictly speaking, none of those vehicles are tanks. 
miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 29, 2014 - 6:03am

got a strawberry festival?

you need a tank! {#Lol}


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