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Celebrity Deaths - DaveInVA - May 24, 2015 - 1:51pm
 
Dyatlov Pass - Steely_D - May 24, 2015 - 12:37pm
 
What Did You Do Today? - DaveInVA - May 24, 2015 - 12:28pm
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - triskele - May 24, 2015 - 12:02pm
 
Counting with Pictures - porphyrius - May 24, 2015 - 11:40am
 
Too commercial? Too mainstream? - bokey - May 24, 2015 - 11:37am
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - May 24, 2015 - 10:59am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - Stewman - May 24, 2015 - 10:46am
 
Israel - RichardPrins - May 24, 2015 - 10:29am
 
What are you doing RIGHT NOW? - triskele - May 24, 2015 - 10:24am
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - triskele - May 24, 2015 - 10:17am
 
Today in History - ScottN - May 24, 2015 - 10:00am
 
Bob Dylan - oldviolin - May 24, 2015 - 9:47am
 
Things You Thought Today - triskele - May 24, 2015 - 8:53am
 
Baseball, anyone? - Prodigal_SOB - May 24, 2015 - 7:54am
 
Internet Speed Test - Beaker - May 24, 2015 - 7:43am
 
How's the weather? - Red_Dragon - May 24, 2015 - 6:16am
 
Questions. - Red_Dragon - May 24, 2015 - 5:46am
 
If not RP, what are you listening to right now? - jadewahoo - May 23, 2015 - 10:32pm
 
What did you have for dinner? - DaveInVA - May 23, 2015 - 6:50pm
 
Movie rental suggestions & reviews - Netflix or Blockbuster - DaveInVA - May 23, 2015 - 6:30pm
 
Saudi Arabia - RichardPrins - May 23, 2015 - 4:52pm
 
What Makes You Laugh? - Beaker - May 23, 2015 - 4:44pm
 
Ireland - haresfur - May 23, 2015 - 4:32pm
 
Films you're excited about. - Alexandra - May 23, 2015 - 3:33pm
 
Ask the Libertarian - porphyrius - May 23, 2015 - 2:16pm
 
Chat on the RPorch - buzz - May 23, 2015 - 9:31am
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - islander - May 23, 2015 - 9:23am
 
Epic Facebook Statuses - Red_Dragon - May 23, 2015 - 7:51am
 
Merry Christmas - buddy - May 23, 2015 - 7:05am
 
Australia - Proclivities - May 23, 2015 - 6:02am
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - kurtster - May 23, 2015 - 5:45am
 
Local Scandals, politics and news - BlueHeronDruid - May 22, 2015 - 8:18pm
 
Please vote for us! - Multi-Polar_Bear - May 22, 2015 - 5:26pm
 
The Dragons' Roost - triskele - May 22, 2015 - 5:15pm
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Coaxial - May 22, 2015 - 4:59pm
 
Show us your NEW _______________!!!! - DaveInVA - May 22, 2015 - 4:10pm
 
Coffee - haresfur - May 22, 2015 - 4:05pm
 
The Global War on Terror - RichardPrins - May 22, 2015 - 3:19pm
 
Philosophy, anyone? - Philosofer123 - May 22, 2015 - 2:52pm
 
new music suggestions - Beaker - May 22, 2015 - 2:03pm
 
Cool New Inventions - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 1:35pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - RichardPrins - May 22, 2015 - 1:27pm
 
So... what's been happening here lately? - Coaxial - May 22, 2015 - 12:25pm
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - ScottN - May 22, 2015 - 12:07pm
 
New Music - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 11:59am
 
Scare Tactics - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 10:59am
 
Tech & Science - miamizsun - May 22, 2015 - 10:50am
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - May 22, 2015 - 9:25am
 
Cool Stuff I Really Want - sirdroseph - May 22, 2015 - 9:20am
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - sirdroseph - May 22, 2015 - 8:48am
 
Background for a quiet dinner party - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 6:11am
 
What makes you smile? - Antigone - May 22, 2015 - 6:07am
 
HALF A WORLD - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 6:01am
 
Will you drive this car for dating with ur girl? - Proclivities - May 22, 2015 - 5:50am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - kurtster - May 22, 2015 - 5:48am
 
Things that make you go Hmmmm..... - sirdroseph - May 22, 2015 - 4:26am
 
Free Mp3s - miamizsun - May 22, 2015 - 4:25am
 
Friggen' Cool Websites - ScottFromWyoming - May 21, 2015 - 9:28pm
 
Scotland - haresfur - May 21, 2015 - 8:08pm
 
Star Trek - Manbird - May 21, 2015 - 7:53pm
 
You might be getting old if...... - muzik - May 21, 2015 - 6:39pm
 
This is amazing! - DaveInVA - May 21, 2015 - 4:31pm
 
Game of Thrones - oldviolin - May 21, 2015 - 1:26pm
 
Celebrity Face Recognition - Antigone - May 21, 2015 - 8:26am
 
Cryptic Posts - Leave Them Guessing - NoEnzLefttoSplit - May 21, 2015 - 8:13am
 
To ROKU or not to ROKU... - HoneyBearKelly - May 21, 2015 - 6:53am
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - NoEnzLefttoSplit - May 21, 2015 - 4:49am
 
Waste Time At Work - NoEnzLefttoSplit - May 20, 2015 - 11:02pm
 
Classic Canadian Bands - haresfur - May 20, 2015 - 7:08pm
 
All Dogs Go To Heaven - Dog Pix - oppositelock - May 20, 2015 - 5:00pm
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - haresfur - May 20, 2015 - 4:56pm
 
What's on SFW's PSD? - haresfur - May 20, 2015 - 3:32pm
 
Things that piss me off - haresfur - May 20, 2015 - 3:29pm
 
OUR CATS!! - haresfur - May 20, 2015 - 3:27pm
 
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Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Canada Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 46, 47, 48  Next
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haresfur
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Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: May 6, 2015 - 6:09pm

 Sean-E-Sean wrote:
I can't help but be cynical. Big oil money is the temptation test of any government. 
 
What? You think it is odd to vote in the social-democrats because the conservatives raised taxes?
Sean-E-Sean

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Location: South Philly


Posted: May 6, 2015 - 7:34am

I can't help but be cynical. Big oil money is the temptation test of any government. 
Red_Dragon
y ddraig goch ddyry gychwyn
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Location: Jesusland


Posted: May 6, 2015 - 6:06am

Well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit.
RichardPrins

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Posted: Apr 15, 2015 - 8:30am

Matthew 6:5 And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.
RichardPrins

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Posted: Apr 3, 2015 - 4:08pm

Local mouth breather...
Social media smote creationist MP James Lunney and he deserved it

If the name James Lunney doesn’t ring a bell, you shouldn’t feel poorly informed. As a Reform and then Conservative Party MP for Nanaimo-Alberni, “Dr.” Lunney has, since his first election in 2000, kept an extraordinarily low profile. His record for legislative contributions amounts to a single 2003 Private Member’s Bill that was dead on arrival. (The bill would have reclassified all natural health products as food, thereby allowing manufacturers to make whatever health claims they like on behalf of their dubious dilutions.)

Now, Lunney has announced: a) that he is not going to run again; and b) that he is a fierce defender of the right to free speech – and especially to the right of religious fundamentalists to deny the theory of evolution.

This view is plainly embarrassing to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, so Lunney has quit the Conservative caucus to sit as an Independent, thereby freeing him up to campaign for scientific illiteracy – and to whimper about having been roughed up in the unmediated internet-court of public opinion.

This all started in February, after Lunney tweeted: “stop calling #evolution fact!”  in an uncharacteristically outspoken effort to defend Ontario Tory MPP Rick Nicholls, who was already in trouble for his creationist promotions.

In a written statement submitted with his resignation, Lunney says, "My remarks were inflated by media, blended with other unrelated but alleged heretical statements and became a top story on national media."

There followed what he described as a round of “cyberbullying” and “crowd-shaming” so severe that Lunney requested special dispensation to offer a long, valedictory counterpoint in the House of Commons. Speaker Andrew Scheer sent him away.

So, Lunney – who always insisted upon being called “Dr.” and yet seldom mentioned his actual chiropractic accreditation – now wants this to be a question of internet civility and freedom of speech. Fine. But then it’s worth considering whether the social-media mob, which has dispatched civility from the public discourse, may also have restored a community function long since lost in our layered and insulated world.

When we lived in villages, everyone knew the idiot. And when he said something silly, the people either pointed and laughed and or they turned away in embarrassed sympathy. In either case, they didn’t elect him chief.

But as our communities grew larger and more complex – as we became more adept at setting up partisan clubs (and churches) where everyone who ascribed to a particular belief cold gather and feel supported – the corrective effect of the crowd was lost. It then became possible for some of those people to work their way into positions of power, making their opinions defensible, not on merit, but merely on the strength of their newfound influence. Consider the existence today of a U.S. Republican establishment that enforces climate change denial as a pre-requisite for positions of leadership.

Yet, even in that strained reality, James Lunney has been given a free pass on many occasions. He gained his influence without ever campaigning on the creationist ideology that he is now trying to promote (I lived in his riding for 10 years and watched his campaigns with interest.) He has taken the taxpayers’ money for 15 years while ever-so-quietly pursuing a program that he never acknowledged at election time. And when he let slip his true opinions and people began the “cyberbullying” and “crowd shaming,” he got all huffy – as if a politician (and one who has been recompensed well beyond his personal contribution) should not be accountable for his actions and pronouncements.

So, yes, the internet is a land of personal vandalism and slander. Too many people leverage anonymity to say appalling things that they would never dare speak in a village, where they, too, were accountable. But that same internet can also be a place of rough justice.

James Lunney has been hiding. He has cloistered himself with a group of people who have agreed to believe a set of ideological precepts that are too embarrassing even for a federal political party that regularly courts the evangelical right.

And now that he has “outed” himself, Lunney wants to stand on a principle he has disregarded himself for 15 years. He wants to be taken seriously as a champion for a freedom of speech that he carefully avoided when he was trying to maintain sufficient credibility to stay electable.

In the civil and accountable village for which we all feel so nostalgic, James Lunney would have been recognized and dismissed as an idiot before ever achieving office. The fact that he has actively hidden his idiocy suggests that he is less than completely honest, as well. If now he feels shamed by the crowd, it’s high time.


RichardPrins

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Posted: Mar 24, 2015 - 9:01pm

Ze neo-nazisten hev lendet/arr comink out of ze klozet
RichardPrins

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Posted: Mar 2, 2015 - 1:11pm

'Spocking' Laurier on $5 not illegal, says Bank of Canada
'Spocking' Laurier on $5 not illegal, says Bank of Canada

RichardPrins

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Posted: Feb 22, 2015 - 9:45pm


via
haresfur
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Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 21, 2015 - 3:39pm

 RichardPrins wrote: 
Cut him some slack.  He's from Winnipeg.
RichardPrins

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Posted: Feb 21, 2015 - 2:48pm

Brief intermission: Canadian MP blames tight underwear for almost missing vote — RT News
RichardPrins

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Posted: Feb 6, 2015 - 10:04am

Canadians have right to doctor-assisted suicide, Supreme Court rules - The Globe and Mail {#Clap}
RichardPrins

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Posted: Oct 2, 2014 - 4:17pm

Canada Is The Only UN Member To Reject Landmark Indigenous Rights Document
Canada singled itself out as the only country to raise objections over a landmark United Nations document re-establishing the protection of the rights of indigenous people last week. It was a gesture one prominent First Nation leader called “saddening, surprising.”

“Canada was viewed always as a country that upheld human rights,” said Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde. “For Canada to be the only nation state to get up to make a caveat on the vote – that’s very telling.”

Bellegarde travelled to New York City to attend a special UN General Assembly meeting of more than 1,000 delegates and heads of state for the first-ever World Conference on Indigenous Peoples on Sept. 22 and 23.

On day one, nations voted on the adoption of the document – the first vote of its kind after the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was introduced in 2007.

In his opening remarks, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke about the document’s significance, saying it helps “set minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of indigenous peoples” – more than 370 million around the world.

“I expect member states to meet their commitments, including by carrying out national action plans to realize our shared vision,” he told delegates.

The United States, who was among four nations (including Canada) who opposed the adoption of the original declaration seven years ago, notably reversed its position. President Barack Obama threw his administration’s support behind the declaration, regarding it as one that will "help reaffirm the principles that should guide our future."

The document was adopted by all nations by consensus last week, but Canada was the only country to file its objections, flagging the wording of “free, prior and informed consent” as problematic.

Free, prior, and informed consent is commonly upheld as a key principle in international law. But according to Ottawa, it’s tricky wording that could be interpreted as “a veto to aboriginal groups and in that regard, cannot be reconciled with Canadian law, as it exists.”

“As a result, Canada cannot associate itself with the elements contained in this outcome document related to free, prior and informed consent,” the government explained in a statement. (...)
On the other hand, giving profligate rights to a trade partner...
RichardPrins

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Posted: Sep 29, 2014 - 8:35pm

United Against Terrorism handbook released at Winnipeg mosque
Islamic groups and RCMP join in effort to fight recruitment of youths by militants

A handbook aimed at preventing young Canadians from being recruited by extremist groups has been released at a Winnipeg mosque today. 

The handbook, titled United Against Terrorism: A Collaborative Effort Towards a Secure, Inclusive and Just Canada, was presented at the Winnipeg Central Mosque.

It's a joint effort between Islamic Social Services, the National Council of Canadian Muslims and the RCMP.

All of us have one objective — we want to secure Canada. We want our youth safe. We do not want them recruited by these criminal gangs," said Shahina Siddiqui, executive director with the Islamic Social Services Association of Canada, one of the groups behind the handbook.

"It's a collaborative effort on, How do we work together to rid Canada of this phenomenon where some of our youth have been radicalized? Of Islamophobia? Of this suspicion that exists between the Muslim community and our law enforcement?" (...)


katzendogs

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Location: Pasadena, Texas
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Sep 28, 2014 - 12:51pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
Harper's New Climate PR Campaign Is Downright Orwellian | Carol Linnitt
Facing criticism in the lead up to the U.N. Climate Summit, which prime minister Stephen Harper did not attend, the Harper Government released a new public outreach campaign through Environment Canada, praising the country's action on climate change.

The campaign points to four pillars of Canada's climate progress including efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, investing in climate adaptation, "world-class scientific research to inform decision-making," and international leadership in climate action.

Already critics are pointing to the apparent disparity between the Environment Canada campaign and Canada's waning reputation on the international stage for its climate obstruction, the muzzling of scientists, the elimination of environmental legislation and massive cuts to federal research and science programs.

"Reading the Harper government's claims about its climate efforts is like reading one of Orwell's books," Mark Jaccard, professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Resource and Environment Management.

"Eliminating policy is to implement policy. Blocking and abandoning global negotiations is to lead global negotiations. Muzzling scientists is to have science inform decision-making. Working hard to increase carbon pollution is to decrease it. Black is white. Dishonesty is truth." (...)

Bizarro Harpes flares up again...

 
I never come in here but I might need to start looking in for my daily humor! {#Wink}
RichardPrins

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Posted: Sep 28, 2014 - 11:32am

Harper's New Climate PR Campaign Is Downright Orwellian | Carol Linnitt
Facing criticism in the lead up to the U.N. Climate Summit, which prime minister Stephen Harper did not attend, the Harper Government released a new public outreach campaign through Environment Canada, praising the country's action on climate change.

The campaign points to four pillars of Canada's climate progress including efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, investing in climate adaptation, "world-class scientific research to inform decision-making," and international leadership in climate action.

Already critics are pointing to the apparent disparity between the Environment Canada campaign and Canada's waning reputation on the international stage for its climate obstruction, the muzzling of scientists, the elimination of environmental legislation and massive cuts to federal research and science programs.

"Reading the Harper government's claims about its climate efforts is like reading one of Orwell's books," Mark Jaccard, professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Resource and Environment Management.

"Eliminating policy is to implement policy. Blocking and abandoning global negotiations is to lead global negotiations. Muzzling scientists is to have science inform decision-making. Working hard to increase carbon pollution is to decrease it. Black is white. Dishonesty is truth." (...)

Bizarro Harpes flares up again...
haresfur
I get around
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Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 5, 2014 - 6:58pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
Our local war-lovin' village idiot opens his mouth again...

Stephen Harper fails to see that World War I was a mistake
Canada's prime minister describes the First World War as a noble enterprise worth emulating.



 
Harper is a piece of work.
RichardPrins

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Posted: Aug 5, 2014 - 6:07pm

Our local war-lovin' village idiot opens his mouth again...

Stephen Harper fails to see that World War I was a mistake
Canada's prime minister describes the First World War as a noble enterprise worth emulating.


RichardPrins

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Posted: Aug 1, 2014 - 5:44pm

Stuck on stupid...

Conservative government renews ad campaign promoting oilsands
The Conservative government is beefing up a multimillion-dollar public relations campaign promoting the oilsands and other Canadian resources, despite research suggesting the blitz has been ineffective.

RichardPrins

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Posted: Jul 27, 2014 - 12:20am


RichardPrins

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Posted: Jul 25, 2014 - 9:13am

Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life
by James Daschuk
University of Regina Press, Regina, 2013
340 pages, illus. $39.95 hardcover

A double review with Hunger, Horses, and Government Men: Criminal Law on the Aboriginal Plains, 1870–1905
by Shelley A.M. Gavigan
UBC Press, Vancouver, 2012
301 pages, illus., $34.95 paperback

The problem with secrets is that they are eventually unearthed, resulting in uncomfortable revelations about the past. This is particularly upsetting when violence, abuse, and murder are involved — but it’s a necessary step in facing the truths of the present.

Some of Canada’s secrets are brought to light in two recent books, which lead to two crucial questions about the future. More on this in a moment.

University of Regina kinesiology and health studies professor James Daschuk’s much-heralded Clearing the Plains is an intricate and well-crafted examination of the historical role of food and disease in the life of First Nations of Western Canada — communities like the Nakota, Dakota, Nehiyawak, Niitsitapi, and Anishinaabe. In a strong first chapter, Daschuk dispenses notions that indigenous sickness and starvation were “new” while gesturing to food security and political autonomy as reasons why these communities flourished for centuries before European contact.

Mostly absent in Daschuk’s analysis is mention of the cultural-spiritual systems forming the actual basis for indigenous health and governments; but this is forgivable due to the broader argument of the book: that Canada insidiously and systematically assaulted First Nations through trade, legislation, and treaty-making in order to exploit and colonize land and resources, assimilate indigenous cultures, and — in Daschuk’s words — forcefully “extend the global economic system to Western Canada.”

With impressive narrative style and research, Daschuk explores the devastating introduction of early pathogens to inland communities that struggled to contain the waves of diseases brought by European traders. At the same time, he shows how an insatiable worldwide demand for furs led to overharvesting, environmental degradation, and starvation and created an “ever-deepening crisis.” While many communities resisted and mobilized, wars and wide-scale animosity arose as food and medicine became scarce and an atmosphere of profound anxiety and nearconstant death created nearly insurmountable odds.

In the book’s final chapters, Daschuk uncovers how early Canadian lawmakers exploited the very situation their ancestors had created. Specifically, he pinpoints both a coercive treaty-making process and then-Prime Minister John A. Macdonald’s widely supported policies of pacification and starvation as two main thrusts that “cleared the plains” and led to the Canadian Pacific Railway, forming the Canada of today. Daschuk also shows how, in the following years, Canada either refused to uphold treaty commitments or, in some cases, used provisions like tainted meat and medicine to maintain famine, uphold draconian control, and “create ecological conditions in which disease exploded.” This dramatically increased after the 1885 Northwest Rebellion, resulting in some communities being “punished to death.” Here Daschuk’s strongest evidence lands at the feet of men like Macdonald and Edgar Dewdney, Indian commissioner for the North-West Territories.

Where Daschuk’s book leaves off, Osgoode Hall law professor Shelley Gavigan’s Hunger, Horses, and Government Men picks up in regard to Canadian criminal law. Meticulously studying records from the court of North-West Territories magistrate Hugh Richardson, Gavigan highlights two points: first, the extensive impacts of the introduction of Canadian criminal law in the western plains after 1870, and second, the specific ways First Nations peoples were able to utilize law and present arguments on their own terms. The first point is not as surprising as the second, but both areas challenge the notion that the Indian Act was the primary means by which indigenous peoples were criminalized — a claim scholars often accept as fact.

Focusing primarily on the daily proceedings of lower courts — “low law” — Gavigan studies how indigenous people encountered the law once they had been charged with a crime. Unsurprisingly, it was a case of two colliding world views. But Gavigan takes great care to show how basic concepts like theft, assault, and even homicide are culturally constructed and lead to cases where the accused “found themselves criminally prosecuted for activities that a few short decades earlier would not have caused them to be prosecuted for anything, much less punished by the white man’s law.” This not only was a shock to the accused but systematically undermined a community’s ways of restoring relationships within its own cultural and judicial means.

A great strength of the book is found in the latter chapters, where Gavigan describes how indigenous peoples manoeuvred within an imposed legal system. One chapter explains how indigenous informants, complainants, and witnesses introduced values that complicated court proceedings. This idea is extended in the following chapter, which explores how courts rendered some decisions that ran against assimilatory Indian policies. The final chapter, an impressive exploration into the treatment of indigenous women by the courts, gestures to a larger process of feminine subjugation and the complex ways property law crept into everyday existence. Gavigan’s care in showing a complex historical record is to be applauded. First Nations may not always have won cases, or had their views understood, but they were often heard, recorded, and had a measure of influence.

Ironically, both books were shortlisted for the Sir John A. Macdonald Prize for the best scholarly book in Canadian history (Daschuk won) but would no doubt make Macdonald cringe from what they unveil about the insidious and genocidal nature of Canadian leaders, their policies, and their practices.

The issue is what to do now that we know this. The first question one might ask is, why is this history so unknown? The documentation is clearly there, and First Nations historians have been relaying stories of starvation, legal impositions, and resistance for decades; it might just be that it takes a while for the academy to catch up and bring it to the country’s attention.

Next we might ask, what is the ethical and responsible role of research that brings this content — and the violent and oppressive underbelly of today’s Canada — to light? In other words, a secret remains a secret if one doesn’t participate in meaningful change for the society in which one lives, especially if genocide is at its core.

It’s simply not enough to write and read a book. One must act on this information. I look forward to what Daschuk, Gavigan, and readers of these outstanding two books will do next in redirecting this country towards a path of reconciliation that we all deserve.

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