RP Listener Forum - Radio Paradise - eclectic commercial free Internet radio
[ ]      [ ]   [ ]

And the good news is.... - islander - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:56pm
 
OUR CATS!! - islander - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:56pm
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos; Please Limit to 510 ... - islander - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:53pm
 
Beer - JustineFromWyoming - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:29pm
 
What Puts You In the Christmas Mood? - triskele - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:56pm
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - haresfur - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:50pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Prodigal_SOB - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:46pm
 
Cryptic Posts - Leave Them Guessing - swell_sailor - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:15pm
 
The Dragons' Roost - triskele - Dec 17, 2014 - 4:15pm
 
Honduras - miamizsun - Dec 17, 2014 - 3:57pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - triskele - Dec 17, 2014 - 3:55pm
 
Help!!!!!!!! - miamizsun - Dec 17, 2014 - 3:31pm
 
Cuba - haresfur - Dec 17, 2014 - 2:56pm
 
Breaking News - haresfur - Dec 17, 2014 - 2:52pm
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Red_Dragon - Dec 17, 2014 - 1:52pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - BillG - Dec 17, 2014 - 1:24pm
 
Things I Saw Today... - Coaxial - Dec 17, 2014 - 1:06pm
 
What the world needs now is .... - Proclivities - Dec 17, 2014 - 12:47pm
 
Things that piss me off - islander - Dec 17, 2014 - 12:42pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - RichardPrins - Dec 17, 2014 - 12:36pm
 
Oklahoma Questions and Points of Interest - Red_Dragon - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:56am
 
Those lovable acronym guys & gals - RichardPrins - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:45am
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - aflanigan - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:38am
 
Nebraska, anyone? - aflanigan - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:26am
 
Strange & Cool Music - sirdroseph - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:14am
 
Random Solutions - Random Advice - VV - Dec 17, 2014 - 11:09am
 
Oops! - Proclivities - Dec 17, 2014 - 10:44am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - ColdMiser - Dec 17, 2014 - 9:19am
 
Amazing animals! - Red_Dragon - Dec 17, 2014 - 9:15am
 
Questions. - Proclivities - Dec 17, 2014 - 8:49am
 
For Jrzy! - MsJudi - Dec 17, 2014 - 8:44am
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - VV - Dec 17, 2014 - 8:33am
 
how do you feel right now? - ditty - Dec 17, 2014 - 8:21am
 
Way Cool Video - Prodigal_SOB - Dec 17, 2014 - 8:17am
 
What's on YOUR PSD right now ? - Proclivities - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:42am
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - Red_Dragon - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:41am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - DaveInVA - Dec 17, 2014 - 7:32am
 
Celebrity Face Recognition - Proclivities - Dec 17, 2014 - 6:46am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Dec 17, 2014 - 6:44am
 
The War On Drugs = Fail - Coaxial - Dec 17, 2014 - 6:22am
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:48am
 
Gardeners Corner - buzz - Dec 17, 2014 - 5:36am
 
Pakistan - sirdroseph - Dec 17, 2014 - 4:05am
 
Joe Strummer docu Friday night D.C. area - RichardPrins - Dec 16, 2014 - 11:27pm
 
The Chomsky / Zinn Reader - RichardPrins - Dec 16, 2014 - 10:10pm
 
Show us your NEW _______________!!!! - Alexandra - Dec 16, 2014 - 10:05pm
 
Make triskele smile - Coaxial - Dec 16, 2014 - 7:22pm
 
Words that should be put on the substitutes bench for a year - Red_Dragon - Dec 16, 2014 - 5:06pm
 
Last gas price paid? - kctomato - Dec 16, 2014 - 4:23pm
 
Job Postings (Keep it real) - haresfur - Dec 16, 2014 - 3:05pm
 
D.R.E.C.K. - VV - Dec 16, 2014 - 3:01pm
 
Separated At Birth...? - Prodigal_SOB - Dec 16, 2014 - 2:52pm
 
Best Song Comments. - lily34 - Dec 16, 2014 - 1:28pm
 
Celebrity Deaths - DaveInVA - Dec 16, 2014 - 1:09pm
 
Name My Band - Proclivities - Dec 16, 2014 - 12:49pm
 
What are you listening to now? - Steely_D - Dec 16, 2014 - 11:20am
 
Animation - Proclivities - Dec 16, 2014 - 10:45am
 
Baseball, anyone? - ScottN - Dec 16, 2014 - 10:14am
 
Unusual News - DaveInVA - Dec 16, 2014 - 7:03am
 
That's good advice - DaveInVA - Dec 16, 2014 - 6:59am
 
Song stuck in your head? - sirdroseph - Dec 16, 2014 - 6:10am
 
Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - olivertwist - Dec 16, 2014 - 5:54am
 
The Global War on Terror - miamizsun - Dec 16, 2014 - 5:14am
 
• • •  What's For Dinner ? • • •  - Coaxial - Dec 16, 2014 - 4:46am
 
How's the weather? - Coaxial - Dec 16, 2014 - 4:41am
 
Caretakers Of Our Parents - marko86 - Dec 16, 2014 - 4:30am
 
Are you ready for some football? - kcar - Dec 15, 2014 - 11:00pm
 
• • • What Makes You Happy? • • •  - Antigone - Dec 15, 2014 - 6:05pm
 
Delicacies: a..k.a.. the Gross Food forum - bokey - Dec 15, 2014 - 4:32pm
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - Dec 15, 2014 - 3:20pm
 
Make Scott laugh - Coaxial - Dec 15, 2014 - 3:13pm
 
• • •  Where Do You Live • • •  - bokey - Dec 15, 2014 - 3:07pm
 
Oh GOD, they're GAY! - Beaker - Dec 15, 2014 - 2:00pm
 
RP app on Roku - Beaker - Dec 15, 2014 - 12:57pm
 
To me , Torture is ............ - triskele - Dec 15, 2014 - 11:11am
 
(a public service of RP)
Index » Internet/Computer » The Web » Tech & Science Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 165, 166, 167  Next
Post to this Topic
DaveInVA
Single, unwanted, unloved eccentric, crusty ol' fart with cats
DaveInVA Avatar

Location: In a hovel in effluent Damnville, VA
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Leo
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Nov 22, 2014 - 6:14pm

A Cargo Plane From 1950
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 30, 2014 - 5:44am

Algal virus found slowing down the brains of humans

An algal virus called ATCV-1 was first discovered several years ago in brain tissue samples taken from deceased humans. Because the researchers couldn't confirm if the virus had made its way there before or after death, not much came from the discovery initially. But more recently, ATCV-1 was discovered again, and this time in the throats of patients affected by psychiatric disease who were very much alive. Was there a connection between the presence of this little-known virus and the patients' psychiatric conditions? Led by paediatric infectious disease expert Robert Yolken, a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins University in the US decided to find out.

ATCV-1 virus is a type of chlorovirus, which typically infects certain species of freshwater green algae. While viruses that infect what’s known as ‘higher plants’, such as ferns, conifers, and flowering plants, are among the smallest viruses known to science, the viruses that infect algae are some of the largest found to date. They have a whopping 600 protein-encoding genes, and act more like bacteria than a virus. They also have the ability to change the cognitive function of their human hosts, as Yolken and his team discovered. 

To do so, they first wanted to find out if the virus was present in healthy people, having already found it in psychiatric patients. Of the 92 healthy people they checked, all based in Balimore in the US, the virus was found in 43 percent of them, and it appeared to be doing weird things to their brains.

According to Elizabeth Pennisi at Science, the subjects who were infected with the virus performed 10 percent worse than their uninfected peers when asked to complete visual processing tasks. One such activity involved drawing a line that connected a sequence of numbers spread randomly across a page, and the infected patients completed it 10 percent slower. They were also shown to have shorter attention spans, and a higher probability of being distracted, the researchers reveal in their study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. As Pennisi notes, "The effects (of ATCV-1) were modest, but significant." (...)


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 28, 2014 - 12:00pm

Grumpy People Get the Details Right — Science of Us

The Study of Science Leads to Leftward Leanings
DaveInVA
Single, unwanted, unloved eccentric, crusty ol' fart with cats
DaveInVA Avatar

Location: In a hovel in effluent Damnville, VA
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Leo
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Oct 23, 2014 - 8:46am

Marty McFly’s hoverboard is finally real, and it’s on Kickstarter right now


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 17, 2014 - 8:47am

 Prodigal_SOB wrote:
He did by the way decide that eating is nice too and later switched to architecture.   I picked up a double major in computer science for similar reasons. 

All play and no work... {#Mrgreen}
Prodigal_SOB
Work is the curse of the drinking class
Prodigal_SOB Avatar

Location: Back Home Again in Indiana
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Oct 17, 2014 - 8:42am

 RichardPrins wrote:

{#Cheesygrin} {#Cheers}

 
He did by the way decide that eating is nice too and later switched to architecture.   I picked up a double major in computer science for similar reasons.
 
Prodigal_SOB
Work is the curse of the drinking class
Prodigal_SOB Avatar

Location: Back Home Again in Indiana
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 6:43pm

 haresfur wrote:

I had a mathematics-major girl friend who hated anything applied because it sullied the pure beauty of maths.  She went to grad school and dropped out, I think because it turned out that there are people in the world as smart or smarter than she. 

 
I had a friend email me this when it came out (as if I would miss one) and I had to write him back to tell him that there is actually scale of purity within mathematics itself as well.  On one end there was modeling and analysis which border on physics then you move on through probability and statistics, algebra, number theory, geometry and topology, and finally ending up at set theory, logic, and foundations.   I think you can guess which end of the spectrum I tended to concentrate on.
  
 
Purity 
 



haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 6:16pm

 Prodigal_SOB wrote:
 
  It was an especially good response since I had also put on the address list my younger brother the Republican and original target of the email as well as a good friend from high school who is sort of a virtual brother and was majoring in philosophy back when I was majoring in mathematics.  I was always telling him at the time that I had a certain admiration for philosophy majors because I felt it was the one discipline in the entire university that was inherently more useless than mathematics.  I might have done it if it weren't for all the writing.
 
I had a mathematics-major girl friend who hated anything applied because it sullied the pure beauty of maths.  She went to grad school and dropped out, I think because it turned out that there are people in the world as smart or smarter than she. 
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 5:51pm

 Prodigal_SOB wrote:
   It was an especially good response since I had also put on the address list my younger brother the Republican and original target of the email as well as a good friend from high school who is sort of a virtual brother and was majoring in philosophy back when I was majoring in mathematics.  I was always telling him at the time that I had a certain admiration for philosophy majors because I felt it was the one discipline in the entire university that was inherently more useless than mathematics.  I might have done it if it weren't for all the writing.
 
{#Cheesygrin} {#Cheers}
Prodigal_SOB
Work is the curse of the drinking class
Prodigal_SOB Avatar

Location: Back Home Again in Indiana
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 5:18pm

 haresfur wrote:

{#Lol}

  
  It was an especially good response since I had also put on the address list my younger brother the Republican and original target of the email as well as a good friend from high school who is sort of a virtual brother and was majoring in philosophy back when I was majoring in mathematics.  I was always telling him at the time that I had a certain admiration for philosophy majors because I felt it was the one discipline in the entire university that was inherently more useless than mathematics.  I might have done it if it weren't for all the writing.

 


haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 4:54pm

 Prodigal_SOB wrote:
  
      I sent this link off to my brother and got the following response.       

Interesting, that Science is seen as the gateway drug to actual (hard) Mathematics.   Although the author didn't extrapolate, one sees how this unfortunate progression can often lead to Philosophy. 

     I think he may actually be on to something here.  I hate it when that happens.

 
{#Lol}
Prodigal_SOB
Work is the curse of the drinking class
Prodigal_SOB Avatar

Location: Back Home Again in Indiana
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 4:05pm

 RichardPrins wrote:   
      I sent this link off to my brother and got the following response.       

Interesting, that Science is seen as the gateway drug to actual (hard) Mathematics.   Although the author didn't extrapolate, one sees how this unfortunate progression can often lead to Philosophy. 

     I think he may actually be on to something here.  I hate it when that happens.
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 16, 2014 - 8:40am

Oh noes!
Some Fear Ebola Outbreak Could Make Nation Turn to Science

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions Filmed with a 4K UltraHD Camera | Colossal

RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 15, 2014 - 6:10pm

 haresfur wrote:
Probably the most earth-shaking advance in medicine ever.
 
After understanding evolution and genes... {#Mrgreen}
(although we're not quite done with either yet)
haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 15, 2014 - 6:02pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
“We have the advantage over the virus,” she said. “We can see the genome in real time and respond to it.”

 
Probably the most earth-shaking advance in medicine ever.
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 15, 2014 - 5:52pm

Scientists Rein In Fears of Ebola, a Virus Whose Mysteries Tend to Invite Speculation- Carl Zimmer

The Ebola virus, which first came to light in 1976 but which could have split off from viruses from 20 million years ago. Centers for Disease Control, via Associated Press

News that a nurse in full protective gear had become infected with the Ebola virus raised some disturbing questions on Monday. Has the virus evolved into some kind of super-pathogen? Might it mutate into something even more terrifying in the months to come?

Evolutionary biologists who study viruses generally agree on the answers to those two questions: no, and probably not.

The Ebola viruses buffeting West Africa today are not fundamentally different from those in previous outbreaks, they say. And it is highly unlikely that natural selection will give the viruses the ability to spread more easily, particularly by becoming airborne.

“I’ve been dismayed by some of the nonsense speculation out there,” said Edward Holmes, a biologist at the University of Sydney in Australia. “I understand why people get nervous about this, but as scientists we need to be very careful we don’t scaremonger.”

Ebola is a mystery that invites speculation. The virus came to light only in 1976, the first known outbreak. Forty years later, scientists are just starting to answer some of the most important questions about it.

Just last month, for example, Derek J. Taylor, an evolutionary biologist at the University at Buffalo, and his colleagues published evidence that Ebola viruses are profoundly ancient, splitting off from other viral lineages at least 20 million years ago. Dr. Taylor’s research suggests that for most of that time, strains of Ebola infected rodents and other mammals.

In 1976, the virus spilled over into the human population from one of those animals, possibly bats. And every few years since then, a new outbreak has emerged in different parts of Central Africa.

Each has been caused by a descendant of the 1976 strain, according to new research by Andrew Rambaut, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Edinburgh.

“It’s possible that there’s a diverse range of viruses, but just a few can make the jump,” Dr. Rambaut said.

Pardis C. Sabeti, a geneticist at Harvard, and her colleagues have analyzed the genomes of Ebola viruses isolated from patients in Sierra Leone to reconstruct the history of the current outbreak. Their research indicates it was the result of a single infection, probably last December.

Since then, the viruses have acquired new mutations as they have spread from person to person. Scary though that may sound, it does not surprise researchers.

All viruses are especially prone to making errors as they copy their genes, and many of these new mutations have no effect. Some are beneficial for the virus — but they don’t necessarily make it more deadly.

Evolutionary biologists see no evidence that new mutations in the Ebola virus are responsible for the huge size of the current outbreak.

“It’s far more plausible that the difference is that it’s gotten into a different human population,” Dr. Rambaut said.

Instead of being limited to remote villages, the virus ended up in cities like Freetown, Sierra Leone, and Conakry, Guinea. The combination of a big population of hosts and a medical system unable to control the infection has led to an epidemic.

“You’ve got a fairly standard Ebola virus,” Dr. Holmes said. “It’s just in the worst possible place.”

As the current outbreak spreads, the virus will continue to mutate. It is conceivable that those increased mutations will lead to evolutionary changes.

Many viruses alter their surface proteins, for example, enabling them to escape the immune system of their hosts. Dr. Sabeti and her colleagues have found some evidence of these shifts in Ebola.

She said it is vital to keep track of the evolution of these shifts. Otherwise, an experimental vaccine might target an out-of-date type of virus.

“We have the advantage over the virus,” she said. “We can see the genome in real time and respond to it.”

It is conceivable that Ebola might become more deadly during this outbreak, but it is by no means a certainty. Ebola outbreaks typically last only months, but other viruses have needed decades to make the change.

Like its close relatives, Ebola spreads through infected fluids, such as vomit and blood. There is no firm evidence that the strain that has caused human outbreaks can spread through the air.

Over the course of millions of years, viruses do sometimes switch their route of infection. “It does happen in an evolutionary context,” Dr. Holmes said.

But it would be a mistake, he warned, to imagine that with a single mutation Ebola might become an airborne pathogen. The change would require many mutations in many genes, and it might be nearly impossible for so many mutations to emerge during a single outbreak. The mutated viruses would survive only if they were superior to the ones spread by bodily fluids.

“The virus is doing pretty well right now,” Dr. Holmes said. “So it would need to be beneficial for the virus to make this quite big jump.”

Dr. Rambaut agreed that the odds were exceedingly low. “Viruses generally don’t change to that radical degree,” he said.

Dr. Sabeti said, “It is biologically plausible, but very unlikely.” Rather than give the virus the opportunity to evolve in any way, she argued, we should focus on stopping Ebola in its tracks.

“We do not know where it is going, but we do not want to wait to find out,” she said.

The ancient history of Ebola, just now coming to light, suggests we may expect to encounter more of its cousins in the future. This fearsome lineage of viruses may have been sprouting many evolutionary branches for tens of millions of years.

“There will be lots more things like Ebola out there,” Dr. Holmes said.


geoff_morphini
Soft on the inside
geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male
Zodiac: Gemini
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Oct 13, 2014 - 1:45pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
Thousands of mountains have been discovered under the sea
Scientists have generated a new map of the ocean floor using radar satellites, and the results have uncovered some of the ocean’s deepest mysteries.


 

“We know less about the ocean's bottom than about the moon's back side.”  Roger Revelle

Now we know a little more. Really cool.


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 13, 2014 - 1:35pm

Cosmic ray particle shower? There’s an app for that.
Run it, and your phone can be part of a vast cosmic ray detector.

RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Oct 8, 2014 - 5:44am

US says it can hack into foreign-based servers without warrants | Ars Technica
Feds say it would have been "reasonable" for FBI to hack into Silk Road servers
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 6, 2014 - 2:08pm


Microsoft Invented A Sheet Of Plastic (And It's Really Cool)

FlexSense is a thin-film, transparent sensing surface based on printed piezoelectric sensors, which can reconstruct complex deformations without the need for any external sensing, such as cameras.


Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 165, 166, 167  Next