RP Listener Forum - Radio Paradise - eclectic commercial free Internet radio
[ ]      [ ]   [ ]

Photography Forum - Your Own Photos; Please Limit to 510 ... - buzz - Sep 1, 2014 - 10:39am
 
What are you doing RIGHT NOW? - Coaxial - Sep 1, 2014 - 10:37am
 
NETFLIX - DaveInVA - Sep 1, 2014 - 10:12am
 
RPeep News You Should Know - miamizsun - Sep 1, 2014 - 8:46am
 
BBQers! - miamizsun - Sep 1, 2014 - 8:44am
 
Counting with Pictures - ZM_Herb - Sep 1, 2014 - 8:01am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Coaxial - Sep 1, 2014 - 6:48am
 
Today in History - ScottN - Sep 1, 2014 - 6:48am
 
~*Funny Cats*~ - DaveInVA - Sep 1, 2014 - 6:41am
 
Name My Band - haresfur - Aug 31, 2014 - 9:29pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Coaxial - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:59pm
 
The Best Web Schmingus Ever - ScottN - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:45pm
 
What did you have for dinner? - bokey - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:44pm
 
Amazing animals! - Antigone - Aug 31, 2014 - 6:05pm
 
Funny Videos - DaveInVA - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:59pm
 
All Dogs Go To Heaven - Dog Pix - Antigone - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:58pm
 
Quotations - Antigone - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:56pm
 
Predictions - kurtster - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:54pm
 
How's the weather? - Coaxial - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:53pm
 
Those Lovable Policemen - DaveInVA - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:53pm
 
Private messages in a public forum - meower - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:51pm
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:12pm
 
Best Song Comments. - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 31, 2014 - 5:11pm
 
Movie quotes used as life's truisms - Steely_D - Aug 31, 2014 - 3:38pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - DaveInVA - Aug 31, 2014 - 2:19pm
 
What Did You Do Today? - PoundPuppy - Aug 31, 2014 - 2:03pm
 
Things I Saw Today... - oldviolin - Aug 31, 2014 - 12:06pm
 
HALF A WORLD - oldviolin - Aug 31, 2014 - 11:03am
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - oldviolin - Aug 31, 2014 - 10:42am
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - oldviolin - Aug 31, 2014 - 10:34am
 
Antiques - Antigone - Aug 31, 2014 - 9:25am
 
Baseball, anyone? - Prodigal_SOB - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:52am
 
Sweet horrible irony. - DaveInVA - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:49am
 
Top 10 things you didn't know about death - Red_Dragon - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:18am
 
The War On You - DaveInVA - Aug 31, 2014 - 8:17am
 
Stuff I've Said Out Loud - Antigone - Aug 31, 2014 - 6:46am
 
Celebrity Deaths - Proclivities - Aug 31, 2014 - 6:43am
 
Education - Red_Dragon - Aug 31, 2014 - 6:27am
 
Great Old Songs You Rarely Hear Anymore - haresfur - Aug 30, 2014 - 11:15pm
 
What makes you smile? - kurtster - Aug 30, 2014 - 8:12pm
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - Aug 30, 2014 - 4:00pm
 
Palestine - ScottN - Aug 30, 2014 - 3:53pm
 
Those lovable NSA/GCHQ/CSEC/DGSE/ASD/CIA guys - RichardPrins - Aug 30, 2014 - 2:29pm
 
Greatest opening lyrics - Alexandra - Aug 30, 2014 - 11:10am
 
Things that piss me off - bokey - Aug 30, 2014 - 9:44am
 
Why are ALL RPeeps determined to find cause to argue in e... - Red_Dragon - Aug 30, 2014 - 9:40am
 
Facebook Tips - Alexandra - Aug 30, 2014 - 9:34am
 
Maps • Google • GeoGuessr - thedoctork - Aug 29, 2014 - 11:51pm
 
~ Have a good joke you can post? ~ - K_Love - Aug 29, 2014 - 10:24pm
 
• • • What Makes You Happy? • • •  - PoundPuppy - Aug 29, 2014 - 5:23pm
 
What do you want to drive? - DaveInVA - Aug 29, 2014 - 4:22pm
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 29, 2014 - 1:50pm
 
Make me a stereo system! (poof!!) - DaveInVA - Aug 29, 2014 - 12:26pm
 
Coffee - miamizsun - Aug 29, 2014 - 12:13pm
 
songs that ROCK! - Sean-E-Sean - Aug 29, 2014 - 12:12pm
 
Lyrics That Remind You of Someone - Sean-E-Sean - Aug 29, 2014 - 11:43am
 
Song stuck in your head? - Sean-E-Sean - Aug 29, 2014 - 11:30am
 
Now & Zen - sirdroseph - Aug 29, 2014 - 10:24am
 
Name My Album - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 29, 2014 - 9:59am
 
Random Solutions - Random Advice - Proclivities - Aug 29, 2014 - 8:29am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - Poacher - Aug 29, 2014 - 8:13am
 
Tips and tricks for reading Forum Topics - Proclivities - Aug 29, 2014 - 8:10am
 
Local Scandals, politics and news - Antigone - Aug 29, 2014 - 7:16am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - 2cats - Aug 29, 2014 - 6:57am
 
TV shows you watch - 2cats - Aug 29, 2014 - 5:40am
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - VV - Aug 29, 2014 - 5:07am
 
Economix - rexi - Aug 29, 2014 - 2:19am
 
Buying a Car - DaveInVA - Aug 28, 2014 - 7:28pm
 
Oh, The Stupidity - DaveInVA - Aug 28, 2014 - 4:22pm
 
Guns - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 28, 2014 - 2:04pm
 
Show us your NEW _______________!!!! - cc_rider - Aug 28, 2014 - 11:35am
 
Celebrity News - DaveInVA - Aug 28, 2014 - 11:05am
 
Infinite cat - Proclivities - Aug 28, 2014 - 11:02am
 
Books read recently - Proclivities - Aug 28, 2014 - 7:28am
 
Ron Paul for President - kurtster - Aug 28, 2014 - 6:49am
 
(a public service of RP)
Index » Internet/Computer » The Web » Tech & Science Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 163, 164, 165  Next
Post to this Topic
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 27, 2014 - 2:56pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
 miamizsun wrote:
as i understand it (or from what i've read in the past) the vast majority of raw climate data/info is not digitized and/or available to share (as easily as it could/should be)

i think if frank or any scientist want more cred that they need to open up/digitized the raw data and the entire process

any project, especially if it is funded by the political process, should be completely and totally open and transparent

i'm thinking a project to share what is there and to digitize (and give) access to the remainder would be great (and not that difficult)

instead of trotting out conclusions show everyone the data and exactly how you got there (via your process, modeling, etc.)

make all of the info/data public (available to everyone)

i would open it all up (a form of crowd sourcing) and let's see where it goes

in science (and life) the process is always more important than the result

An enormous amount of data is already available to the public (and especially to any serious budding climate researchers).

So, by all means go nuts, re-analyze it (there's enough to learn about/keep you busy for quite a while), and report back with your findings...

PS: Also reminds me a lot of interactions with creationists who demanded to see tree ring archive data (while likely being clueless on how to interpret/correlate/handle them). If they didn't get access (to restricted/preserved/perishable material), evolution couldn't possibly be true and a secular cover-up/conspiracy must be responsible. Same tactics. Same rejection of solid science for ideological purposes (and politicizing the process of science as the article points out).

 
???

go nuts {#Lol}

that's not necessary in my case

what i was referring to was an article i read on science daily/eurekalert some time back

80 percent of world climate data are not computerized

IMAGE: The scientific community is only able to access and analyze 20 percent of the recorded climate information held.

Click here for more information.

In order to gain a better knowledge of climate variations, such as those caused by global warming, and be able to tackle them, we need to understand what happened in the recent past. This is the conclusion of a research study led by the Rovira i Virgili University (URV), which shows that the scientific community today is only able to access and analyse 20% of the recorded climate information held. The remaining data are not accessible in digital format.

Some climate data in Europe go back to the 17th Century, but "not even 20% of the information recorded in the past is available to the scientific community", Manola Brunet, lead author of the study and a researcher at the URV's Centre for Climate Change, tells SINC.

This situation is even worse in continents such as Africa and South America, where weather observations did not begin until the middle of the 19th Century. These are the results of a study published in Climate Research, which highlights the need to urgently recover all the information recorded in perishable formats.

"Failure to decipher the messages in the climate records of the past will result in socioeconomic problems, because we will be unable to deal with the current and future impacts of climate change and a hotter world", says Brunet.

Spain, along with the USA, Canada, Holland and Norway, is one of a small number of countries which allows partial access to its historic climate data. The rest of the world does not make these data available to the scientific community or the general public, despite recommendations to this effect by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

In order to overcome the political and legal hurdles posed by this currently poor access, "governments should adopt a resolution within the United Nations on opening up their historical climate data", the researcher suggests.



i think there are several examples where state money/grants were funding climate research and cases of them not voluntarily giving up all of the data so they were sued (maybe modeling iirc)

i wouldn't conflate creationism/denial-ism in any way with well intentioned skepticism (a fallacy?)

the burden of proof is on those making the claim

regards


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 22, 2014 - 9:42am

 miamizsun wrote:
as i understand it (or from what i've read in the past) the vast majority of raw climate data/info is not digitized and/or available to share (as easily as it could/should be)

i think if frank or any scientist want more cred that they need to open up/digitized the raw data and the entire process

any project, especially if it is funded by the political process, should be completely and totally open and transparent

i'm thinking a project to share what is there and to digitize (and give) access to the remainder would be great (and not that difficult)

instead of trotting out conclusions show everyone the data and exactly how you got there (via your process, modeling, etc.)

make all of the info/data public (available to everyone)

i would open it all up (a form of crowd sourcing) and let's see where it goes

in science (and life) the process is always more important than the result

An enormous amount of data is already available to the public (and especially to any serious budding climate researchers).

So, by all means go nuts, re-analyze it (there's enough to learn about/keep you busy for quite a while), and report back with your findings...

PS: Also reminds me a lot of interactions with creationists who demanded to see tree ring archive data (while likely being clueless on how to interpret/correlate/handle them). If they didn't get access (to restricted/preserved/perishable material), evolution couldn't possibly be true and a secular cover-up/conspiracy must be responsible. Same tactics. Same rejection of solid science for ideological purposes (and politicizing the process of science as the article points out).
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 22, 2014 - 5:02am

 RichardPrins wrote:
Welcome to the Age of Denial - Adam Frank/NYTimes.com

(...) This is not a world the scientists I trained with would recognize. Many of them served on the Manhattan Project. Afterward, they helped create the technologies that drove America’s postwar prosperity. In that era of the mid-20th century, politicians were expected to support science financially but otherwise leave it alone. The disaster of Lysenkoism, in which Communist ideology distorted scientific truth and all but destroyed Russian biological science, was still a fresh memory.

The triumph of Western science led most of my professors to believe that progress was inevitable. While the bargain between science and political culture was at times challenged — the nuclear power debate of the 1970s, for example — the battles were fought using scientific evidence. Manufacturing doubt remained firmly off-limits.

Today, however, it is politically effective, and socially acceptable, to deny scientific fact. Narrowly defined, “creationism” was a minor current in American thinking for much of the 20th century. But in the years since I was a student, a well-funded effort has skillfully rebranded that ideology as “creation science” and pushed it into classrooms across the country. Though transparently unscientific, denying evolution has become a litmus test for some conservative politicians, even at the highest levels.

Meanwhile, climate deniers, taking pages from the creationists’ PR playbook, have manufactured doubt about fundamental issues in climate science that were decided scientifically decades ago. And anti-vaccine campaigners brandish a few long-discredited studies to make unproven claims about links between autism and vaccination.

The list goes on. North Carolina has banned state planners from using climate data in their projections of future sea levels. So many Oregon parents have refused vaccination that the state is revising its school entry policies. And all of this is happening in a culture that is less engaged with science and technology as intellectual pursuits than at any point I can remember.

Thus, even as our day-to-day experiences have become dependent on technological progress, many of our leaders have abandoned the postwar bargain in favor of what the scientist Michael Mann calls the “scientization of politics.” (...)

 

as i understand it (or from what i've read in the past) the vast majority of raw climate data/info is not digitized and/or available to share (as easily as it could/should be)

i think if frank or any scientist want more cred that they need to open up/digitized the raw data and the entire process

any project, especially if it is funded by the political process, should be completely and totally open and transparent

i'm thinking a project to share what is there and to digitize (and give) access to the remainder would be great (and not that difficult)

instead of trotting out conclusions show everyone the data and exactly how you got there (via your process, modeling, etc.)

make all of the info/data public (available to everyone)

i would open it all up (a form of crowd sourcing) and let's see where it goes

in science (and life) the process is always more important than the result

peace



RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 21, 2014 - 12:30pm

Welcome to the Age of Denial - Adam Frank/NYTimes.com

(...) This is not a world the scientists I trained with would recognize. Many of them served on the Manhattan Project. Afterward, they helped create the technologies that drove America’s postwar prosperity. In that era of the mid-20th century, politicians were expected to support science financially but otherwise leave it alone. The disaster of Lysenkoism, in which Communist ideology distorted scientific truth and all but destroyed Russian biological science, was still a fresh memory.

The triumph of Western science led most of my professors to believe that progress was inevitable. While the bargain between science and political culture was at times challenged — the nuclear power debate of the 1970s, for example — the battles were fought using scientific evidence. Manufacturing doubt remained firmly off-limits.

Today, however, it is politically effective, and socially acceptable, to deny scientific fact. Narrowly defined, “creationism” was a minor current in American thinking for much of the 20th century. But in the years since I was a student, a well-funded effort has skillfully rebranded that ideology as “creation science” and pushed it into classrooms across the country. Though transparently unscientific, denying evolution has become a litmus test for some conservative politicians, even at the highest levels.

Meanwhile, climate deniers, taking pages from the creationists’ PR playbook, have manufactured doubt about fundamental issues in climate science that were decided scientifically decades ago. And anti-vaccine campaigners brandish a few long-discredited studies to make unproven claims about links between autism and vaccination.

The list goes on. North Carolina has banned state planners from using climate data in their projections of future sea levels. So many Oregon parents have refused vaccination that the state is revising its school entry policies. And all of this is happening in a culture that is less engaged with science and technology as intellectual pursuits than at any point I can remember.

Thus, even as our day-to-day experiences have become dependent on technological progress, many of our leaders have abandoned the postwar bargain in favor of what the scientist Michael Mann calls the “scientization of politics.” (...)


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 20, 2014 - 8:29pm

The 10,000 Hour Rule Is Not Real
The biggest meta-analysis of research to date indicates that practice does not make perfect

The 10,000 hour rule—first proposed by a Swedish psychologist and later made famous in Malcolm Gladwell's Outliersstates that exceptional expertise requires at least 10,000 hours of practice. The best of the best (the Beatles, Bill Gates) all amassed more than 10,000 hours of practice before rising to the top, Gladwell argued. So greatness is within virtually any person's grasp, so long as they can put in the time to master their skill of choice.

A new meta-analysis, however, indicates that the 10,000 hour rule simply does not exist. As Brain's Idea reports, authors of the new study undertook the largest literature survey on this subject to date, compiling the results of 88 scientific articles representing data from some 11,000 research participants. Practice, they found, on average explains just 12 percent of skill mastery and subsequent success. "In other words the 10,000-Hour rule is nonsense," Brain's Idea writes. "Stop believing in it. Sure, practice is important. But other factors (age? intelligence? talent?) appear to play a bigger role." (...)


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 19, 2014 - 10:54pm

Life in space? Sea plankton discovered attached to ISS outer hull — RT News

RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 14, 2014 - 7:12pm


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 7, 2014 - 3:07pm


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 6, 2014 - 11:11am


Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on 3 August from a distance of 285 km. The image resolution is 5.3 metres/pixel.

Stunning close up detail focusing on a smooth region on the ‘base’ of the ‘body’ section of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was taken by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera and downloaded today, 6 August. The image clearly shows a range of features, including boulders, craters and steep cliffs. The image was taken from a distance of 130 km and the image resolution is 2.4 metres per pixel.


Prodigal_SOB
Work is the curse of the drinking class
Prodigal_SOB Avatar

Location: Back Home Again in Indiana
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Sagittarius
Chinese Yr: Snake


Posted: Aug 6, 2014 - 7:41am

 RichardPrins wrote: 
 
  Quantum Vacuum Virtual Plasma


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 5, 2014 - 6:48pm

Rosetta Spacecraft Set for Unprecedented Close Study of a Comet - NYTimes.com

After 10 years and four billion miles, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft will arrive at its destination on Wednesday for the first extended, close examination of a comet.

The last in a series of 10 thruster firings over the past few months will slow Rosetta to the pace of a person walking, about two miles per hour relative to the speed of its target, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at a distance of about 60 miles.

Photographs have already revealed a surprisingly irregular shape for the 2.5-mile-wide comet, possibly an amalgamation of two icy bodies or a result of uneven weathering during previous flybys. From a distance, the blurry blob initially looked somewhat like a rubber duck. As the details came into the focus, it now more resembles a knob of ginger flying through space. (...)


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 2, 2014 - 11:52am


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Aug 1, 2014 - 11:43am

Nasa validates 'impossible' space drive
Nasa is a major player in space science, so when a team from the agency this week presents evidence that "impossible" microwave thrusters seem to work, something strange is definitely going on. Either the results are completely wrong, or Nasa has confirmed a major breakthrough in space propulsion.

British scientist Roger Shawyer has been trying to interest people in his EmDrive for some years through his company SPR Ltd. Shawyer claims the EmDrive converts electric power into thrust, without the need for any propellant by bouncing microwaves around in a closed container. He has built a number of demonstration systems, but critics reject his relativity-based theory and insist that, according to the law of conservation of momentum, it cannot work.

According to good scientific practice, an independent third party needed to replicate Shawyer's results. As Wired.co.uk reported, this happened last year when a Chinese team built its own EmDrive and confirmed that it produced 720 mN (about 72 grams) of thrust, enough for a practical satellite thruster. Such a thruster could be powered by solar electricity, eliminating the need for the supply of propellant that occupies up to half the launch mass of many satellites. The Chinese work attracted little attention; it seems that nobody in the West believed in it.

However, a US scientist, Guido Fetta, has built his own propellant-less microwave thruster, and managed to persuade Nasa to test it out. The test results were presented on July 30 at the 50th Joint Propulsion Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Astonishingly enough, they are positive. (...)


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 31, 2014 - 11:56am

This thumbdrive hacks computers. “BadUSB” exploit makes devices turn “evil” | Ars Technica
RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 3:48pm

 ScottN wrote:
(...) But there is hope, according to the authors...if we act.
 
Where's the money (and fun) in that (aside from Hollywood)? {#Wink}
haresfur
I get around
haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle Australia
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 3:30pm

 ScottN wrote:
The popular magazine Scientific American, noted for its extreme sensationalism  {#Biggrin}, offers a ray of optimism in forestalling or minimizing the ongoing Anthropecine Disfaunation.  I find little joy in their clinical term for how we are devastating biodiversity as we foul our only nest.  But there is hope, according to the authors...if we act.

 
Isn't Scientific American an endangered species? {#Devil_pimp}
Coaxial
SHINE ON
Coaxial Avatar

Location: 543 miles west of Paradis,1491 miles east of Paradise
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Capricorn
Chinese Yr: Dragon


Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 3:23pm

 expertTexpert wrote:

Libtard

 


expertTexpert

expertTexpert Avatar

Location: Waiting for the van to come


Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 3:19pm

 ScottN wrote:
The popular magazine Scientific American, noted for its extreme sensationalism  {#Biggrin}, offers a ray of optimism in forestalling or minimizing the ongoing Anthropecine Disfaunation.  I find little joy in their clinical term for how we are devastating biodiversity as we foul our only nest.  But there is hope, according to the authors...if we act.

 
Libtard
ScottN
Strike three? Ump, that wasn't even close
ScottN Avatar

Location: An inch above the K/T boundary. But smth near fracking still has appeal.
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aries
Chinese Yr: Buffalo


Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 2:38pm

The popular magazine Scientific American, noted for its extreme sensationalism  {#Biggrin}, offers a ray of optimism in forestalling or minimizing the ongoing Anthropecine Disfaunation.  I find little joy in their clinical term for how we are devastating biodiversity as we foul our only nest.  But there is hope, according to the authors...if we act.


RichardPrins
Anti-Procrustean
RichardPrins Avatar



Posted: Jul 29, 2014 - 1:11pm

Tasmania was attached to North America 1.4 billion years ago
A study of prehistoric minerals has revealed Tasmania’s geographical origins.

Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 163, 164, 165  Next