[ ]      [ ]   [ ]

Baseball, anyone? - haresfur - May 20, 2018 - 9:26pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - haresfur - May 20, 2018 - 9:02pm
 
Classical Music - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 9:01pm
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 8:05pm
 
Buying a Car - SeriousLee - May 20, 2018 - 6:58pm
 
Guns - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 5:32pm
 
Trump - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 5:21pm
 
BillyGee's Greatest Segues - SeriousLee - May 20, 2018 - 4:07pm
 
The Dragons' Roost - Red_Dragon - May 20, 2018 - 3:50pm
 
Fake News*  ?  ! - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 2:57pm
 
Stuff I've Said Out Loud - Antigone - May 20, 2018 - 2:46pm
 
PUNS - BIRDS - oldviolin - May 20, 2018 - 2:13pm
 
Race in America - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 1:52pm
 
Bad Poetry - ScottFromWyoming - May 20, 2018 - 1:50pm
 
What makes you smile? - Steely_D - May 20, 2018 - 12:14pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Antigone - May 20, 2018 - 12:00pm
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - Antigone - May 20, 2018 - 11:03am
 
Name My Band - helenofjoy - May 20, 2018 - 9:33am
 
Is Wikipedia Objective? - maryte - May 20, 2018 - 8:20am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - miamizsun - May 20, 2018 - 7:42am
 
What are you listening to now? - SeriousLee - May 20, 2018 - 7:22am
 
More reggae, less Marley please - sirdroseph - May 20, 2018 - 6:26am
 
Beer - sirdroseph - May 20, 2018 - 6:23am
 
songs that ROCK! - R_P - May 20, 2018 - 2:03am
 
Iran - richskarma - May 19, 2018 - 11:05pm
 
Make me a stereo system! (poof!!) - Beaker - May 19, 2018 - 8:51pm
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - May 19, 2018 - 6:15pm
 
Mixtape Culture Club - ColdMiser - May 19, 2018 - 5:18pm
 
Radio Paradise on the Amazon Echo - jarro - May 19, 2018 - 4:30pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - k_trout - May 19, 2018 - 3:01pm
 
RP Daily Trivia Challenge - maryte - May 19, 2018 - 10:52am
 
What are you reading now? - triskele - May 19, 2018 - 5:49am
 
What Are You Grateful For? - triskele - May 19, 2018 - 5:47am
 
The Truth Unfolds - SeriousLee - May 19, 2018 - 4:52am
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - SeriousLee - May 19, 2018 - 4:26am
 
OMG how I hate the sound of Joni Mitchell singing.... - ColdMiser - May 19, 2018 - 4:17am
 
Name My Album - SeriousLee - May 19, 2018 - 2:08am
 
New Music - R_P - May 19, 2018 - 12:35am
 
Those Silly FBI Guys! - kurtster - May 18, 2018 - 10:24pm
 
Unusual News - kcar - May 18, 2018 - 8:13pm
 
hallucinogenic drugs - kcar - May 18, 2018 - 8:07pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - May 18, 2018 - 3:01pm
 
Things We Shouldn't Have To Say - Steely_D - May 18, 2018 - 2:58pm
 
The Global War on Terror - R_P - May 18, 2018 - 1:17pm
 
Proposed Crime of the Century: - haresfur - May 18, 2018 - 1:08pm
 
Bitcoin - Steely_D - May 18, 2018 - 1:04pm
 
Rock Movies/Documentaries - Proclivities - May 18, 2018 - 11:43am
 
The War On Drugs = Fail - Proclivities - May 18, 2018 - 11:42am
 
Regarding dogs - R_P - May 18, 2018 - 11:39am
 
Propaganda - Proclivities - May 18, 2018 - 10:35am
 
Celebrity Deaths - Antigone - May 18, 2018 - 8:50am
 
FLAC stream - marco79cgn - May 18, 2018 - 8:30am
 
Roku Soundbridge M1000 - STOPPED WORKING! HELP! - adam8021x - May 18, 2018 - 7:15am
 
Quick! I need a chicken... - Proclivities - May 18, 2018 - 6:54am
 
Palestine - R_P - May 17, 2018 - 10:49pm
 
Those lovable acronym guys & gals - R_P - May 17, 2018 - 8:47pm
 
Israel - R_P - May 17, 2018 - 7:32pm
 
HomeKit HomePod AppleTV - Steely_D - May 17, 2018 - 6:02pm
 
illegal immigrants - kcar - May 17, 2018 - 5:30pm
 
True Confessions - Coaxial - May 17, 2018 - 4:39pm
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - May 17, 2018 - 1:34pm
 
Climate Change - pigtail - May 17, 2018 - 10:04am
 
oh boy CAKE! - Coaxial - May 17, 2018 - 6:55am
 
How's the weather? - Coaxial - May 17, 2018 - 6:05am
 
Radio Paradise Flac in Volumio - bigbargain - May 17, 2018 - 6:02am
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - sirdroseph - May 17, 2018 - 2:56am
 
Live Music - R_P - May 16, 2018 - 10:11pm
 
RPeep News You Should Know - Red_Dragon - May 16, 2018 - 7:52pm
 
Economix - R_P - May 16, 2018 - 3:20pm
 
Unresearched Conspiracy Theories - JrzyTmata - May 16, 2018 - 12:14pm
 
Alexa, what's playing error - jarro - May 16, 2018 - 11:59am
 
North Korea - sirdroseph - May 16, 2018 - 11:57am
 
Coffee - Steely_D - May 16, 2018 - 9:57am
 
Things that make you go Hmmmm..... - Antigone - May 16, 2018 - 9:53am
 
Design-Creative - Proclivities - May 16, 2018 - 8:05am
 
Index » Internet/Computer » The Web » Tech & Science Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 184, 185, 186  Next
Post to this Topic
R_P
Oînk, oînk, OÎNK!
R_P Avatar



Posted: May 11, 2018 - 12:55pm

Alexa and Siri Can Hear This Hidden Command. You Can’t.
Researchers can now send secret audio instructions undetectable to the human ear to Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant.

miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: May 9, 2018 - 7:44am

i struggled with the plural of pancreas

anywho that is unlikely to change the science

shout out to my home chickens!

 University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute

The Diabetes Research Institute leads the world in cure-focused research. As the largest and most comprehensive research center dedicated to curing diabetes, the DRI is aggressively working to develop biological cure by restoring natural insulin production and normalizing blood sugar levels without imposing other risks.

Since its inception, the DRI has made significant contributions to the field of diabetes, pioneering many of the techniques used in diabetes centers around the world. Having already shown that diabetes can be reversed through islet transplantation, the DRI is building upon these promising outcomes by addressing the major challenges that have limited this cell replacement therapy to the most severe cases of type 1 diabetes. Among its major research initiatives is the development of the DRI BioHub, a bioengineered “mini organ” that mimics the native pancreas, containing real insulin-producing cells and other vital components that keep the cells healthy and able to function long term. While various BioHub "platforms" are being tested in preclinical and clinical studies, DRI researchers are also intensely focused on developing strategies to eliminate the need for anti-rejection drugs and halt the autoimmune attack that caused the onset of the disease, and developing an unlimited supply of insulin-producing cells.




miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: May 8, 2018 - 3:58pm


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: May 1, 2018 - 3:04pm

the coveted Blavatnik Awards


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 30, 2018 - 5:48am

60 Mins feature...

CRISPR: The gene-editing tool revolutionizing biomedical research

A new tool could be the key to treating genetic diseases and may be the most consequential discovery in biomedicine this century




miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 28, 2018 - 5:38am


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 27, 2018 - 10:28am

wow...

Scientists capture how a single cell develops into an embryo


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 26, 2018 - 9:22am

really promising tech




Today, we’ve unveiled our vision for the world’s first and only CRISPR-enabled platform capable of detecting any biomarker or disease containing DNA or RNA.
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 25, 2018 - 9:41am

oops

happy dna day!
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 25, 2018 - 6:24am

like 

Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

Scientists have identified five targets that reduce the parasite’s ability to invade red blood cells

In the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage – when invading human red blood cells – and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite’s ability to enter red blood cells.

Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk of malaria and more than 200 million people are infected each year. The disease caused the deaths of almost half a million people globally in 2015*.




miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 25, 2018 - 6:15am

very creative! (a tattoo)

An artificial mole as an early warning sign

18.04.2018 | News

By:  Peter Rüegg  |  1  Comment

ETH researchers working with Martin Fussenegger have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumour develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin.


As soon as the calcium level exceeds a particular threshold over a longer period of time, an implant inserted under the skin triggers the production of melanin. This causes a mole to form. (Re-enacted montage: ETH Zurich)

Alongside cardiovascular disease, cancer has become the top cause of death in industrialised countries. Many of those affected are diagnosed only after the tumour has developed extensively. This often reduces the chance of recovery significantly: the cure rate for prostate cancer is 32 percent and only 11 percent for colon cancer. The ability to detect such tumours reliably and early would not only save lives, but also reduce the need for expensive, stressful treatment.




Lazy8
human
Lazy8 Avatar

Location: The Gallatin Valley of Montana
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 24, 2018 - 11:22pm

aflanigan wrote:
The back and forth you and NoEnz have had popped into my mind when I saw the story of the judge who decided that a macaque monkey could not legally assert a copyright to photos he had taken.

Walking home yesterday and seeing a number of front yards being actively guarded by male robins, it seemed to me that these creatures do recognize/assert property (territory) rights, can distinguish between "self" and "other", and mostly abide by established rules (i.e. negotiated understanding of where my "territory" ends and where "other's" territory begins). They're certainly sentient to some degree.

Perhaps the real determinant of mutual assertion and honoring of rights is based more on species; the fat robin that has claimed our entire back yard (yep, he's a big boy) doesn't seem to mind me hanging out there because I'm not "other" to him, not a member of his species. The statement by Taney in Dred Scott that the black man "had no rights which the white man was bound to respect" was, I'd suggest, undergirded by the implicit assumption that they were not biologically the same (different race) as white Europeans (it kind of had to be, given the "all men are created equal" language found in the Declaration of Independence).

While the modern concept of the species was just emerging if was recognized even then that races were somewhat arbitrary differences between humans. This debate is not new. James Madison was particularly eloquent in Federalist 54:

we must deny the fact, that slaves are considered merely as property, and in no respect whatever as persons. The true state of the case is, that they partake of both these qualities: being considered by our laws, in some respects, as persons, and in other respects as property. In being compelled to labor, not for himself, but for a master; in being vendible by one master to another master; and in being subject at all times to be restrained in his liberty and chastised in his body, by the capricious will of another, the slave may appear to be degraded from the human rank, and classed with those irrational animals which fall under the legal denomination of property. In being protected, on the other hand, in his life and in his limbs, against the violence of all others, even the master of his labor and his liberty; and in being punishable himself for all violence committed against others, the slave is no less evidently regarded by the law as a member of the society, not as a part of the irrational creation; as a moral person, not as a mere article of property.

The only way to live with that contradiction was to ignore it, which of course eventually became impossible. One day we may have to face that with another species.
aflanigan
Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity
aflanigan Avatar

Location: At Sea
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Apr 24, 2018 - 8:52am

 Lazy8 wrote:
As for the first point...read it again? I'm insisting that reciprocity is a necessary condition for the concept of rights. That's equivalent to the axiom of everyone has the same rights. And yes, that's fundamental to the concept of rights; every thinker who acknowledges that there are such things uses that as a starting point.

Sentience is a necessary condition to recognizing that, for instance, there is such a thing as self and other—pretty basic to functioning with others. Would an agreement to abide by rules have any meaning without sentience?

While recognizing that the comatose, children, and insane have rights we also recognize that they have limited sentience and thus limited ability to exercise those rights. We have various social structures in place for others to make decisions for them—parents, legal guardians, and in some cases the state). Even if they can't, say, enter into contracts it's immoral to kill them or harvest organs without previous consent. We also don't hold them as responsible for their actions even if those actions violate the rights of others.

Or we're supposed to anyway; in the states there is an alarming tendency to charge children in serious crimes as adults and punish them as such. Failure to be philosophically consistent isn't a refutation of the philosophy.

And I think we have the kernel of an agreement here. More and more our willingness to kill, eat, and otherwise mess with other species is dependent on their perceived sentience. We already find cruelty to animals (even non-sentient ones) abhorrent, but domestic turkeys (just to bring up a delicious delicious example) are only slightly more intelligent than pineapples. While there isn't rigor there I suspect there could be.

As for David Brin...I still haven't liked anything he's done better than the original novella that expanded into The Postman—an exploration into what it means to be civilized. But what keeps me reading him is his eagerness to explore ideas like the concept of "uplift"—genetically modifying other species to sentience. He's written at least 6 books with that as a theme.

Fun trivia—he was a physics postdoc at my alma mater while I was there, and published his first novel while I was a starving undergrad. I had no idea we overlapped there until years later, even as I was reading his fiction. Would have made an effort to meet him had I known.

 
The back and forth you and NoEnz have had popped into my mind when I saw the story of the judge who decided that a macaque monkey could not legally assert a copyright to photos he had taken.

Walking home yesterday and seeing a number of front yards being actively guarded by male robins, it seemed to me that these creatures do recognize/assert property (territory) rights, can distinguish between "self" and "other", and mostly abide by established rules (i.e. negotiated understanding of where my "territory" ends and where "other's" territory begins). They're certainly sentient to some degree.

Perhaps the real determinant of mutual assertion and honoring of rights is based more on species; the fat robin that has claimed our entire back yard (yep, he's a big boy) doesn't seem to mind me hanging out there because I'm not "other" to him, not a member of his species. The statement by Taney in Dred Scott that the black man "had no rights which the white man was bound to respect" was, I'd suggest, undergirded by the implicit assumption that they were not biologically the same (different race) as white Europeans (it kind of had to be, given the "all men are created equal" language found in the Declaration of Independence).


R_P
Oînk, oînk, OÎNK!
R_P Avatar



Posted: Apr 23, 2018 - 4:53pm

US soldier gets world's first penis and scrotum transplant
aflanigan
Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity
aflanigan Avatar

Location: At Sea
Gender: Male
Zodiac: Aquarius
Chinese Yr: Rat


Posted: Apr 22, 2018 - 12:25pm

 Lazy8 wrote:
(snip)

Fun trivia—he was a physics postdoc at my alma mater while I was there, and published his first novel while I was a starving undergrad. I had no idea we overlapped there until years later, even as I was reading his fiction. Would have made an effort to meet him had I known.

 
Of all sad words of keyboard or pen, the saddest are these - it might have been.
Lazy8
human
Lazy8 Avatar

Location: The Gallatin Valley of Montana
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 22, 2018 - 11:55am

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:
ok, you've confused me. How and where did you assert the opposite?
"I don't expect my cats to respect my privacy. My dogs have only minimal understanding of the concept of property—mainly limited to if it fits in my mouth it's mine. So no, I won't extend the concept of rights to other species until they can reciprocate." 

And exchanging the word human for the word sentient doesn't make it any better. What is so special about sentient? Do people in a coma have no rights? Where is the parity there?

And you gotta love the delicious irony in your attempt to remove yourself from a God-given right to domination only to replace it with an equally fictitious source (natural rights) to raze and plunder anything that is not sentient. 

Though I am quite happy to read some David Brin. So thanks for that.  

Finally, that rights only exist in a social context is the whole point. We have the ability to choose. So why not? The population of Southern Right Whales is mightily happy we did.

As for the first point...read it again? I'm insisting that reciprocity is a necessary condition for the concept of rights. That's equivalent to the axiom of everyone has the same rights. And yes, that's fundamental to the concept of rights; every thinker who acknowledges that there are such things uses that as a starting point.

Sentience is a necessary condition to recognizing that, for instance, there is such a thing as self and other—pretty basic to functioning with others. Would an agreement to abide by rules have any meaning without sentience?

While recognizing that the comatose, children, and insane have rights we also recognize that they have limited sentience and thus limited ability to exercise those rights. We have various social structures in place for others to make decisions for them—parents, legal guardians, and in some cases the state). Even if they can't, say, enter into contracts it's immoral to kill them or harvest organs without previous consent. We also don't hold them as responsible for their actions even if those actions violate the rights of others.

Or we're supposed to anyway; in the states there is an alarming tendency to charge children in serious crimes as adults and punish them as such. Failure to be philosophically consistent isn't a refutation of the philosophy.

And I think we have the kernel of an agreement here. More and more our willingness to kill, eat, and otherwise mess with other species is dependent on their perceived sentience. We already find cruelty to animals (even non-sentient ones) abhorrent, but domestic turkeys (just to bring up a delicious delicious example) are only slightly more intelligent than pineapples. While there isn't rigor there I suspect there could be.

As for David Brin...I still haven't liked anything he's done better than the original novella that expanded into The Postman—an exploration into what it means to be civilized. But what keeps me reading him is his eagerness to explore ideas like the concept of "uplift"—genetically modifying other species to sentience. He's written at least 6 books with that as a theme.

Fun trivia—he was a physics postdoc at my alma mater while I was there, and published his first novel while I was a starving undergrad. I had no idea we overlapped there until years later, even as I was reading his fiction. Would have made an effort to meet him had I known.
NoEnzLefttoSplit
Being Norwegian is over-rated.
NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male
Zodiac: Taurus
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Apr 22, 2018 - 10:48am

 Lazy8 wrote:
 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:
You are on thin ice here. The ability to reciprocate can't possibly be a foundation for rights, as you yourself would be the first to admit. But I do like the idea of a parrot I could talk to.

And the charge of human exceptionalism applies much better to you than me, simply by asserting rights for us and none for other living creatures. Really? Isn't this straight out of Genesis?

No, our technology has given us great power. Moreover, we have the ability to control and apply that power. Don't the basic tenets of liability law apply here? We have a duty of care. We have the ability to exercise care. If we breach that duty of care we should be held liable. Pure and simple. Neither of these two premises applies to lions (of which there as damn few left, btw). That doesn't mean they don't have any rights.

I just asserted the very opposite. You've made a testable assertion ("can't possibly") and I just provided a counterexample (I, um, did)—ask your parrot.

Genesis claimed not just exceptionalism but dominion—the right to rule, and the authority came from a deity. So no, not straight outa Genesis. And I claim exceptionalism not for a species but for sentience. That parrot, say.

The best explorations I know of into the ethics of genetic manipulation vis-a-vis sentience are in the realm of fiction, specifically science fiction. Check out some David Brin*—good reads even if the philosophizing doesn't interest you.

*Yes, I know Heinlein was there first, but I'd worry NoEnz's head would explode.

 
ok, you've confused me. How and where did you assert the opposite?
"I don't expect my cats to respect my privacy. My dogs have only minimal understanding of the concept of property—mainly limited to if it fits in my mouth it's mine. So no, I won't extend the concept of rights to other species until they can reciprocate." 

And exchanging the word human for the word sentient doesn't make it any better. What is so special about sentient? Do people in a coma have no rights? Where is the parity there?

And you gotta love the delicious irony in your attempt to remove yourself from a God-given right to domination only to replace it with an equally fictitious source (natural rights) to raze and plunder anything that is not sentient. 

Though I am quite happy to read some David Brin. So thanks for that.  

Finally, that rights only exist in a social context is the whole point. We have the ability to choose. So why not? The population of Southern Right Whales is mightily happy we did.
rhahl
If it sounds good, it is good.
rhahl Avatar



Posted: Apr 22, 2018 - 9:22am

 miamizsun wrote:

New microscope captures 3-D movies of cells inside living organisms in unprecedented detail

 
I sent this video to a friend who manufactures a low cost ($50k) 3D microscope in Hawaii, asking how this new one works. His answer:
 

"This is a huge breakthrough to be able to see this kind of live 3D in vivo in a living organism.

"Lot's of new questions can be asked. Very Exciting! By the way, this is a multi million dollar instrument.

"They have combined lightsheet microscopy with adaptive optics (AO) (which is a technique that was partially developed here in Maui at the Institute for Astronomy, where I have my microscope lab). I was working with one of the leaders of AO to incorporate it into the Edge microscope system when he was suddenly struck with lung cancer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_sheet_fluorescence_microscopy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptive_optics

"Lightsheet microscopy illuminates only the plane of the specimen that is in focus. The microscope precisely focuses at different levels to produce a stack of images, much like the Edge microscope produces a stack of images. Then they sharpen the image using AO, which eliminates the distortions in the wave-front that are caused by the light traveling through the parts of the specimen that is not at the focal plane. It is achieved the same way the distortions in the atmosphere are eliminated using AO on telescopes. It uses a wave-front detector and a deformable mirror. The wave-front detector shapes the deformable mirror to restore the original wave-front.

Cool stuff.

Cheers, Gary

Gary Greenberg, PhD

greenberg@edge-3d.com

www.Edge-3D.com

PO Box 792169

Paia, HI 96779

808 344 5954




Lazy8
human
Lazy8 Avatar

Location: The Gallatin Valley of Montana
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 22, 2018 - 9:11am

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:
You are on thin ice here. The ability to reciprocate can't possibly be a foundation for rights, as you yourself would be the first to admit. But I do like the idea of a parrot I could talk to.

And the charge of human exceptionalism applies much better to you than me, simply by asserting rights for us and none for other living creatures. Really? Isn't this straight out of Genesis?

No, our technology has given us great power. Moreover, we have the ability to control and apply that power. Don't the basic tenets of liability law apply here? We have a duty of care. We have the ability to exercise care. If we breach that duty of care we should be held liable. Pure and simple. Neither of these two premises applies to lions (of which there as damn few left, btw). That doesn't mean they don't have any rights.

I just asserted the very opposite. You've made a testable assertion ("can't possibly") and I just provided a counterexample (I, um, did)—ask your parrot.

Genesis claimed not just exceptionalism but dominion—the right to rule, and the authority came from a deity. So no, not straight outa Genesis. And I claim exceptionalism not for a species but for sentience. That parrot, say.

The best explorations I know of into the ethics of genetic manipulation vis-a-vis sentience are in the realm of fiction, specifically science fiction. Check out some David Brin*—good reads even if the philosophizing doesn't interest you.

*Yes, I know Heinlein was there first, but I'd worry NoEnz's head would explode.
NoEnzLefttoSplit
Being Norwegian is over-rated.
NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male
Zodiac: Taurus
Chinese Yr: Tiger


Posted: Apr 21, 2018 - 11:25pm

 Lazy8 wrote:

Our bodies kill living organisms (parasites, pathogenic microbes) in uncountable numbers every day. They can't help it—it's part of being a body. You willing to extend the concept of rights to, say, influenza viruses?

If we impose that rule on ourselves (and I see no reason to regard a whale or a lion any differently in that regard from say, a chicken) then do we then impose that rule on lions?

Why not? If killing another animal is so bad we should never do it why should we allow it to happen, even at the deepest depths of the sea?

What about whales, then? Do krill count?

You're making an artificial distinction by putting man outside of nature. We eat other organisms and are in turn eaten when the time comes.

The concept of rights is (as you half-correctly point out) a human construct. An ethical law, not a physical law. It has no effect outside of a social environment—they impose duties on people with respect to others. We make a distinction between humans and animals in that we expect parity with humans: I recognize and respect your rights, you recognize and respect mine. You violate my rights and I am justified in responding in kind.

I don't expect my cats to respect my privacy. My dogs have only minimal understanding of the concept of property—mainly limited to if it fits in my mouth it's mine. So no, I won't extend the concept of rights to other species until they can reciprocate.

And if you want to start genetically engineering parrots or cuttlefish capable of respecting the rights of others (which, I want to emphasize, I would be completely fine with) then I'd be delighted to extend the concept to them.

 
You are on thin ice here. The ability to reciprocate can't possibly be a foundation for rights, as you yourself would be the first to admit. But I do like the idea of a parrot I could talk to.

And the charge of human exceptionalism applies much better to you than me, simply by asserting rights for us and none for other living creatures. Really? Isn't this straight out of Genesis?

No, our technology has given us great power. Moreover, we have the ability to control and apply that power. Don't the basic tenets of liability law apply here? We have a duty of care. We have the ability to exercise care. If we breach that duty of care we should be held liable. Pure and simple. Neither of these two premises applies to lions (of which there as damn few left, btw). That doesn't mean they don't have any rights.


Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 184, 185, 186  Next