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countyman
(Pittsburgh Where Stanley lives now)
Posted: Aug 05, 2017 12:54
 

He performed this and Wave on SNL.  Wave mesmerized me.
primm
Posted: Apr 11, 2017 9:02
 

{#Guitarist} great song ! great album mr Wilson could not have done it anybetter !
zepher
Posted: Apr 05, 2017 8:20
 

 crogers wrote:

Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
Wow.  That is a lot of words.  It's dizzying how smart you are.  It's like looking at Einstein's Math equations on the chalk board.  How about this —> People need to feel connected to a higher power.  The question is the connection.  Lots of folks feel comfort in Jesus being their conduit or representative.  It is something everyone can understand from the young, old and even folks born with mental capacity problems can know Jesus and also Jesus knows them.  He is like a road out of the desert.... Why take that away from folks?  How about the assurance of a poor widow who longs to see her husband again, or a Mother who lost a child wanting reunion in Heaven.  Because you are smarter and think you know the answer?  Read the bible yourself, looks like you have an affinity for words.  The New Testament is probably shorter than the last book you read  Open your mind.  

P.S - I still think this sounds like a Brian Wilson tune....
smackiepipe
(Western North Carolina)
Posted: Apr 05, 2017 8:03
 

 dkwalika wrote:
I should just by this album, I guess.

 
I did. Well worth it.
dkwalika
(Upper Midwest)
Posted: Jan 26, 2017 7:03
 

I should just by this album, I guess.
Segue
(Almost Paradise)
Posted: Dec 25, 2016 15:32
 

RP listeners frequently find ourselves stopped in our tracks. 😺💓💓💓
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Dec 03, 2016 14:55
 

http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/l/b45ad2daf001f3035db78e0026d91f4f/2581587.jpg
LizK
(West Florida, where the gators roam)
Posted: Sep 24, 2016 20:11
 

 crogers wrote:

Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
There are those people who use their faith to inspire them to compassionate action.  Even as one might disagree with some parts of their faith (me & Billy Graham for example), it works for the greater good.  Alas, there are too many who use their faith for judging and condemming (Franklin Graham for example). 
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Jul 06, 2016 11:25
 

 crogers wrote:
... Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
Perpective does change things — three- or four-point perspective enhances many pictures but generally requires a lot of erasing before the final drawing is done.
{#Cheers} 
LPCity
(Salt Lake City, Utah)
Posted: Jun 04, 2016 11:56
 

I watched the Austin City Limits show with Beck, recorded in 2014.  The man still has it!
 
Jag_87
Posted: Apr 13, 2016 14:30
 

Relaxing in the middle of somewhere in Portugal loving rp. Thanks
Dosequis
Posted: Feb 15, 2016 8:05
 

 Hoosfoos wrote:White no talent meets black no talent.
Beck should respect artistry.



 

flyboy50
(Austin TX)
Posted: Feb 15, 2016 7:52
 

The opening of this song is channeling John Lennon.
 
bluejay08003
Posted: Jan 09, 2016 15:11
 

The lush production may be overdone for some, but it just sweeps me away.  Most excellent!  I love this album!
Hoosfoos
Posted: Dec 28, 2015 16:19
 

Beck should respect artistry.


passsion8
(over the hills and far away)
Posted: Dec 09, 2015 6:18
 

 stegokitty wrote:
My favourite album of 2014.
Every track is consistent with the thematic feeling, and well-done. 

 
{#Clap}
LizK
(West Florida, where the gators roam)
Posted: Nov 20, 2015 20:40
 

 Grammarcop wrote:
Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  

 
Which leaves them out of "The Perfect Country and Western Song"  No Mama, beer, or prison.
dsd
(PDX)
Posted: Oct 20, 2015 15:13
 

Now, whenever I listen to Beck I am thankful that I can hear what Kanye can't—
OceanBlue
(The other 71%)
Posted: Jun 04, 2015 8:29
 

Even five until that choppy staccato guitar towards the end... now a solid 7 :D
mrtuba9
(most likely near Normal)
Posted: May 12, 2015 17:07
 

{#Arrow} 7
crogers
(Sunny California)
Posted: May 06, 2015 16:23
 

 ircdn wrote:
All That Aside

Don't you just love that little clarinet sounding part at the end of the song that goes "Be-Be-Boop-Boop-Be-Boop-Be"? {#Cool}
 
 
Yup, got it... thanks.  Obviously a hot button for me.


ircdn
Posted: May 03, 2015 15:28
 

All That Aside

Don't you just love that little clarinet sounding part at the end of the song that goes "Be-Be-Boop-Boop-Be-Boop-Be"? {#Cool}
 

    Proclivities wrote:
Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.
Good to hear from you, Proc -
I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena. 
Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.
Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
jbuhl
(Boulder,CO)
Posted: May 03, 2015 15:18
 

Kanye where are you?
crogers
(Sunny California)
Posted: Apr 23, 2015 13:22
 

 Proclivities wrote:

Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.

 
Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...

Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Apr 21, 2015 10:37
 

 crogers wrote:

big·ot·ed   ˈbiɡədəd/   adjective
 
1. having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others.

 
Huh, sounds like a good way to describe the teachings of most of the world's most popular religions, doesn't it?  Ya know, they don't call it dogma for nothing.  

When a rational, learned person, when confronted with all of that obstinance, prejudice and seemingly boundless hypocrisy, makes a considered, personal choice to simply not believe —  only to find themselves treated intolerantly by those espousing "freedom of religion", it should be no surprise that they see a little crazy leaking out from around all those glass houses.
 
Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.
crogers
(Sunny California)
Posted: Mar 30, 2015 17:32
 

 stegokitty wrote:


> What religion isn't crazy?
  
Bigoted much?
 
big·ot·ed   ˈbiɡədəd/   adjective
 
1. having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others.

 
Huh, sounds like a good way to describe the teachings of most of the world's most popular religions, doesn't it?  Ya know, they don't call it dogma for nothing.  

When a rational, learned person, when confronted with all of that obstinance, prejudice and seemingly boundless hypocrisy, makes a considered, personal choice to simply not believe —  only to find themselves treated intolerantly by those espousing "freedom of religion", it should be no surprise that they see a little crazy leaking out from around all those glass houses.

 

stegokitty
Posted: Mar 20, 2015 17:20
 

 ick wrote:

What religion isn't crazy?

 
Bigoted much?
stegokitty
Posted: Mar 20, 2015 17:19
 

My favourite album of 2014.
Every track is consistent with the thematic feeling, and well-done. 
Kaisersosay
(Mighty Mighty Bostown)
Posted: Mar 11, 2015 10:18
 

 Grammarcop wrote:
Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  

 
Now wait a minute, once you go tractor , you never go back
Grammarcop
(My neighbor drives a Bentley; I drive a minivan.)
Posted: Mar 10, 2015 6:57
 

Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  
jukes1
(Indianapolis, IN)
Posted: Mar 10, 2015 6:40
 

Good song, but I hear this enough on my way to work. Maybe we can vote to "hear it again in 3 years?"
zigzag
Posted: Feb 07, 2015 22:16
 

A wonderful bookend to the excellent Sea Change.

I do like it when Beck decides to write actual songs. 
acupunk
(West Hartford)
Posted: Dec 26, 2014 8:21
 

Love this album.
Egrey
(WASH, DC)
Posted: Dec 02, 2014 8:31
 

Great, great album.  Thanks RP!
alux
(atop the pyramid)
Posted: Nov 06, 2014 0:42
 

 moodfood wrote:
okay but why so much FM radio like airplay?

 
Chill please...
ick
(...out of the primordial ooze)
Posted: Oct 13, 2014 8:44
 

 Relayer wrote:
Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.

 
What religion isn't crazy?
Dosequis
Posted: Oct 10, 2014 15:36
 

 jagdriver wrote:
A very consistent album from start to finish, like a suite. I really enjoy it while making/eating breakfast.

Right now PBS has another Austin City Limits performance of his (theirs) you can stream for free. 

 
Free?   They would have to pay ME to watch that boring no-talent.
jagdriver
(Just a nod and a wink south of Paradise)
Posted: Oct 10, 2014 15:28
 

A very consistent album from start to finish, like a suite. I really enjoy it while making/eating breakfast.

Right now PBS has another Austin City Limits performance of his (theirs) you can stream for free. 
Dosequis
Posted: Oct 08, 2014 14:51
 

This is just boring.
2020sk
Posted: Oct 04, 2014 16:35
 

Not growing on me. I'm unpleasantly disappointed :-(
Rozsa
(ZÃŒri Oberland)
Posted: Sep 30, 2014 9:50
 

This music always takes me away to a place I wanna be.....{#Yes}
peregrin
(New Zealand)
Posted: Sep 13, 2014 17:45
 

I'm liking this new work from Beck. Some of those early albums seemed like random cacophonies.
moodfood
(In a galaxy far far away)
Posted: Sep 04, 2014 14:18
 

okay but why so much FM radio like airplay?
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Aug 23, 2014 7:12
 

 On_The_Beach wrote:
BEWARE PROCTOLOGIST!!!
Or is it sociologist, I can't remember?

 
Herpetologist, mycologist, ophthalmologist?
izycrzy
Posted: Aug 14, 2014 16:54
 

I love this song
Grammarcop
(Detroit is that way. Canada is the other.)
Posted: Aug 01, 2014 10:32
 

If you didn't see it, Beck was on The Colbert Report on 28 July 14.  Wondering about the mood of the album, Colbert asked, "Why Beck sad?"
JeriF
Posted: Jul 14, 2014 11:02
 

Caught Beck live at an outdoor amphitheater last weekend, complete with full moon, and the show was just fabulous.  The man is such an amazing artist.  His bandmates were pretty spectacular too:)   If you get a chance to see him, you won't be disappointed.


SmackDaddy
(San Diego)
Posted: Jun 05, 2014 12:07
 

 Relayer wrote:
Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.

 

From what I've read, he doen't have any crazy Scientology ideas. His parents were Scientologists and that's what he grew up with, but it sounded to me like he doesn't really think about it much, but then again i read that a long time ago.

BTW what crazy religious ideas do you ascribed to? 
Relayer
(Gainesville, FL)
Posted: Jun 05, 2014 11:59
 

Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.
SmileOnADog
(Arizona)
Posted: Jun 02, 2014 17:37
 

Loved the unique Saturday Night Live performances.  Beck is certainly marching to his own drummer, props for that.