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expatlar
Posted: Mar 28, 2018 15:49
 

"...our nation turns its lonely eyes to you.." just made me burst out laughing. Uh oh.
TJOpootertoot
(Toronto)
Posted: Jul 04, 2017 13:41
 

 ecomaniac wrote:

Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.

 
I remember a great story Simon told on a 60 Minutes interview many moons ago.
He'd run into Joe DiMaggio and DiMaggio was like, "What do you mean, 'where have you gone?'" I'm right here! I'm doing ads for Mr. Coffee and everything!"

Simon pointed out that DiMaggio had yet to think of himself as a metaphor.

Point is, great song. Unimpeachable.
Rooney
(Near Paradise)
Posted: Mar 04, 2017 10:50
 

"Put it in your pantry with your cupcakes."  Can't get that image out of my mind.{#Tongue}
expatlar
Posted: Feb 01, 2017 16:03
 

An original and great song when it was made, and still.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:12
 

 below72 wrote:
These two NY boys were fine together - until:
1) Arty believed he was an actor...
2) Arty believed he was the creative one..
3) Arty tried to become 'a solo act'.
Oh my, Arty was delusional.

 
Was Paul Simon your source for this theory?
pjlk
(Southern New Jersey)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:06
 

 hayduke2 wrote:

clapping smiling emoji for this sweet remembrance, Thank You jbarryc!  (I thought he was excellent at the DNC too  : )

 
Thanks jbarryc for taking the time to share this!  P.S. has meant SO much to SO many of my generation.  And, thanks R.P. for keeping him current!
Mustangbill
(Poolesville, Maryland)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:04
 

 ecomaniac wrote:

Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.

 
I agree. For those of us who grew up in the 60's and saw the movie, this was a counterculture theme song. Understandable that it holds a different feeling for some than for others. It's definitely not their best musically. 
crombarron
(NW corner)
Posted: Aug 18, 2016 10:17
 

CzspfzxrSxzzxxPzzZZzxzz cz
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Jul 30, 2016 8:53
 

 jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.

 
clapping smiling emoji for this sweet remembrance, Thank You jbarryc!  (I thought he was excellent at the DNC too  : )
ecomaniac
(Pale Blue Dot)
Posted: Jun 28, 2016 12:53
 

 haretic wrote:
I never really enjoyed "Mrs. Robinson," and over the years I've come to cringe every time I hear it on the radio. I consider it Paul Simon's worst-ever lyric.
Every time I hear this song begin, I think: "Why?? We could be listening to something outstanding from Simon and Garfunkel instead of this drek!"
{#Whipit}

 
Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.
below72
(Sunset Beach, NC)
Posted: Jun 28, 2016 12:52
 

These two NY boys were fine together - until:
1) Arty believed he was an actor...
2) Arty believed he was the creative one..
3) Arty tried to become 'a solo act'.
Oh my, Arty was delusional.
coloradojohn
(Mihara, nestled in a cove on the SetoNaiKai, Japan)
Posted: May 14, 2016 21:39
 

The original chiming guitar work and shimmering layers that influenced and inspired so many after. Imagine you are hearing this for the first times again, as I can clearly recall, as a kid, with this on the car radio, with the top down, and Mom and Dad singing along — although when pressed as to the meanings of some of the lyrics, they were happy to offer the establishment line: "Umm, controversial!"
TerryS
(Another SW)
Posted: Apr 12, 2016 19:39
 

Back when they could still stand each other..........or is that over?
Asa001
(Toronto)
Posted: Mar 24, 2016 14:40
 

This song isn't fantastic but this album is!
haretic
(toward Abad, just south of Maitri)
Posted: Mar 12, 2016 2:09
 

I have loved Simon and Garfunkel ever since I first heard my older brother's copy of "Wednesday Morning, 3 AM" way back when.
(I still far prefer the acoustic original of "The Sounds of Silence").
I never really enjoyed "Mrs. Robinson," and over the years I've come to cringe every time I hear it on the radio. I consider it Paul Simon's worst-ever lyric.
Every time I hear this song begin, I think: "Why?? We could be listening to something outstanding from Simon and Garfunkel instead of this drek!"
{#Whipit}
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Jan 21, 2016 17:55
 

http://www.sedelmynt.se/1940/10kr-offset.jpg
The_Enemy
(...is within)
Posted: Nov 19, 2015 13:36
 

 SheRidesABeemer wrote:
48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 

 
I'm in my 50's and I sometimes listen to music from the 1920's but I'm the exception among my acquaintances (not counting folks here who are likely all over the musical map). I listen to pretty much every genre and age.

Most people I know my age prefer music that was made between 1965-1985.

My parents listened to Classical music and my wife's listened to the worst that contemporary Country had to offer :)  So they weren't listening to the 1920s music.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Nov 19, 2015 13:19
 

 SheRidesABeemer wrote:
48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 

 
Mine did - but probably more music from the 1930s and '40s than the '20s.
SheRidesABeemer
(Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA)
Posted: Nov 07, 2015 5:37
 

48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 
senorcerveza
(San Miguel de Allende Mexico)
Posted: Apr 13, 2015 14:39
 

Never get tired of this one-classic!