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TJOpootertoot
(Toronto)
Posted: Jul 04, 2017 13:41
 

 ecomaniac wrote:

Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.

 
I remember a great story Simon told on a 60 Minutes interview many moons ago.
He'd run into Joe DiMaggio and DiMaggio was like, "What do you mean, 'where have you gone?'" I'm right here! I'm doing ads for Mr. Coffee and everything!"

Simon pointed out that DiMaggio had yet to think of himself as a metaphor.

Point is, great song. Unimpeachable.
Rooney
(Near Paradise)
Posted: Mar 04, 2017 10:50
 

"Put it in your pantry with your cupcakes."  Can't get that image out of my mind.{#Tongue}
expatlar
(Michoacan, Mexico)
Posted: Feb 01, 2017 16:03
 

An original and great song when it was made, and still.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:12
 

 below72 wrote:
These two NY boys were fine together - until:
1) Arty believed he was an actor...
2) Arty believed he was the creative one..
3) Arty tried to become 'a solo act'.
Oh my, Arty was delusional.

 
Was Paul Simon your source for this theory?
pjlk
(Southern New Jersey)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:06
 

 hayduke2 wrote:

clapping smiling emoji for this sweet remembrance, Thank You jbarryc!  (I thought he was excellent at the DNC too  : )

 
Thanks jbarryc for taking the time to share this!  P.S. has meant SO much to SO many of my generation.  And, thanks R.P. for keeping him current!
Mustangbill
(Poolesville, Maryland)
Posted: Dec 02, 2016 8:04
 

 ecomaniac wrote:

Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.

 
I agree. For those of us who grew up in the 60's and saw the movie, this was a counterculture theme song. Understandable that it holds a different feeling for some than for others. It's definitely not their best musically. 
crombarron
(NW corner)
Posted: Aug 18, 2016 10:17
 

CzspfzxrSxzzxxPzzZZzxzz cz
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Jul 30, 2016 8:53
 

 jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.

 
clapping smiling emoji for this sweet remembrance, Thank You jbarryc!  (I thought he was excellent at the DNC too  : )
ecomaniac
(Pale Blue Dot)
Posted: Jun 28, 2016 12:53
 

 haretic wrote:
I never really enjoyed "Mrs. Robinson," and over the years I've come to cringe every time I hear it on the radio. I consider it Paul Simon's worst-ever lyric.
Every time I hear this song begin, I think: "Why??? We could be listening to something outstanding from Simon and Garfunkel instead of this drek!"
{#Whipit}

 
Perhaps you have to have seen the movie - this song wasn't released (nor finished) until after it made The Graduate soundtrack.  Word is, Paul had Eleanor Roosevelt in mind when he penned these lyrics, but changed the name to Robinson for the movie.
below72
Posted: Jun 28, 2016 12:52
 

These two NY boys were fine together - until:
1) Arty believed he was an actor...
2) Arty believed he was the creative one..
3) Arty tried to become 'a solo act'.
Oh my, Arty was delusional.
coloradojohn
(Re-booting at the foot of The Flatirons, BOULDER)
Posted: May 14, 2016 21:39
 

The original chiming guitar work and shimmering layers that influenced and inspired so many after. Imagine you are hearing this for the first times again, as I can clearly recall, as a kid, with this on the car radio, with the top down, and Mom and Dad singing along — although when pressed as to the meanings of some of the lyrics, they were happy to offer the establishment line: "Umm, controversial!"
TerryS
(Another SW)
Posted: Apr 12, 2016 19:39
 

Back when they could still stand each other..........or is that over?
Asa001
(Toronto)
Posted: Mar 24, 2016 14:40
 

This song isn't fantastic but this album is!
haretic
(toward Abad, just south of Maitri)
Posted: Mar 12, 2016 2:09
 

I have loved Simon and Garfunkel ever since I first heard my older brother's copy of "Wednesday Morning, 3 AM" way back when.
(I still far prefer the acoustic original of "The Sounds of Silence").
I never really enjoyed "Mrs. Robinson," and over the years I've come to cringe every time I hear it on the radio. I consider it Paul Simon's worst-ever lyric.
Every time I hear this song begin, I think: "Why??? We could be listening to something outstanding from Simon and Garfunkel instead of this drek!"
{#Whipit}
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Jan 21, 2016 17:55
 

http://www.sedelmynt.se/1940/10kr-offset.jpg
The_Enemy
(...is within)
Posted: Nov 19, 2015 13:36
 

 SheRidesABeemer wrote:
48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 

 
I'm in my 50's and I sometimes listen to music from the 1920's but I'm the exception among my acquaintances (not counting folks here who are likely all over the musical map). I listen to pretty much every genre and age.

Most people I know my age prefer music that was made between 1965-1985.

My parents listened to Classical music and my wife's listened to the worst that contemporary Country had to offer :)  So they weren't listening to the 1920s music.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Nov 19, 2015 13:19
 

 SheRidesABeemer wrote:
48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 

 
Mine did - but probably more music from the 1930s and '40s than the '20s.
SheRidesABeemer
(Nashua, NH)
Posted: Nov 07, 2015 5:37
 

48 years old and we still love listening to it.  Did our parents love listening to music from the 1920's when they were in their 50's? I don't think so. 
senorcerveza
(Mexico)
Posted: Apr 13, 2015 14:39
 

Never get tired of this one-classic!
Jannne
(Tasmania 42 degrees South)
Posted: Dec 27, 2014 18:25
 

{#Crown}  {#Crown}  {#Crown}  iconic ...BIG  happiness factor comes with  this song
steeler
(Perched on the precipice of the cauldron of truth)
Posted: Nov 07, 2014 12:34
 

Back in the day, this album was instrumental in making me think about life's issues and teaching me the importance of doing so.
aflanigan
(At Sea)
Posted: Oct 07, 2014 7:49
 

Heard recently the story about how this song was not originally about Mrs. Robinson, but about Mrs. (Eleanor) Roosevelt.

Mrs. Robinson 
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Aug 24, 2014 18:16
 

 WonderLizard wrote:

This is not directed at you, rdo. However, I'm mounting a campaign for a level linguistic playing field on RP. The original "Mrs. Robinson" is this one by Simon and Garfunkel. The Lemonheads' version is a cover. I'm suggesting that we restrict the notion of "versions" to covers. And that the original is the original, not a "version." Adopting this convention will help resolve the confusion about which recording was the original and which was a cover—and there is a lot of confusion on these boards about too many songs.

I know, this has a snowball's chance in hell, but it sure felt good to get it out...{#Wink} 

 
I see your point and applaud the notion, but perhaps this particular tune is a bad place to start.  This version, which appears on Simon & Garfunkel's "Bookends" album, was completed after the shorter "early" version, which appears in The Graduate and on its original (there's that word again) soundtrack.  So technically, this one is a "later" version.
Pedro1874
(Newton-le-Willows, England)
Posted: Jul 24, 2014 11:49
 

Soooooo good, a brilliant track and a brilliant movie from the very best of the soundtrack of my youth {#Notworthy}
expertTexpert
(High in the Custerdome)
Posted: Jul 24, 2014 11:45
 

 jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.

 
I...I have something in my eye.

{#Cool} 
rdo
(DC)
Posted: May 22, 2014 19:33
 

 Hannio wrote:
 

I don't know about Mrs. Robinson, but Anne Bancroft was beautiful till the day she died. 

I bet most people don't know she was married to Mel Brooks for 41 years.  Somehow I find that amazing.  

 
Maybe he had a big shlong.
stef_ji
(Siena)
Posted: Apr 21, 2014 12:41
 

At" La Porta di Sotto" Restaurant - Buonconvento - Italy    RADIO PARADISE is ON-AIR
treatment_bound
(Duluth to Madison)
Posted: Apr 02, 2014 9:05
 

charlton-heston-wayne-s-world-2


gallery
mojcamojca77
(Idrija)
Posted: Jan 28, 2014 21:47
 

 jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.

 
what a thouching writing :-)
Peter_Bradshaw
(Salisbury)
Posted: Dec 15, 2013 14:56
 

{#Heartkiss}  priceless - is G O D L I K E
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Nov 26, 2013 14:12
 

 zepher wrote:
Plastics!
 
Now we know where Bono got his sunglasses!


zepher
Posted: Nov 26, 2013 10:38
 

Plastics!



Sloggydog
(UK)
Posted: Nov 14, 2013 1:28
 

 rdo wrote:
I like the Lemmonheads version better.  {#Foot-in-mouth}

 
TRANSLATION: I just found this stick and am not sure what to do with it

also I am pretty sure they were going for that Mumford and Sons sound when they made this
idiot_wind
Posted: Sep 24, 2013 13:40
 

Geez...these guys sound like Mumford and Sons. 
capandjudy
(Huntington, WV)
Posted: Jul 11, 2013 9:34
 

Joe Osborn on bass and Hal Blaine on drums on this LP as well as other members of the wrecking crew. I was in the 12th grade I believe thinking "That is some great bass work" and not knowing these studio greats at the time. 
Hannio
(Austin, TX)
Posted: Jul 11, 2013 8:47
 

 johnjconn wrote:
In the 60's , Mrs. Robinson was a hot piece of ass.
Today she's a dog.


  

I don't know about Mrs. Robinson, but Anne Bancroft was beautiful till the day she died. 

I bet most people don't know she was married to Mel Brooks for 41 years.  Somehow I find that amazing.  
helgigermany
(Germany)
Posted: Jun 22, 2013 2:20
 

Anywhere, anytime, this is always nice!
rdo
(DC)
Posted: Apr 07, 2013 13:41
 

 WonderLizard wrote:

This is not directed at you, rdo. However, I'm mounting a campaign for a level linguistic playing field on RP. The original "Mrs. Robinson" is this one by Simon and Garfunkel. The Lemonheads' version is a cover. I'm suggesting that we restrict the notion of "versions" to covers. And that the original is the original, not a "version." Adopting this convention will help resolve the confusion about which recording was the original and which was a cover—and there is a lot of confusion on these boards about too many songs.

I know, this has a snowball's chance in hell, but it sure felt good to get it out...{#Wink} 
 

I totally agree.  I was just trying to be funny.  I rarely like the covers better than the original, and if you know me you'll know that I believe very strongly that the utmost deference should always be given to the original recording. 
d-don
(Oregon)
Posted: Mar 19, 2013 11:48
 

 jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.
 
Beautiful! Thanks for sharing. In the words of Napoleon Dynamite, "Lucky!"
coloradojohn
(A Mile High and then some, Cherry Creek, Denver)
Posted: Feb 03, 2013 17:29
 

 COOL STORY!  And just how I would want to think of him based on his music, which is among the very best ever done...
———
jbarryc wrote:
While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.

jbarryc
Posted: Jan 03, 2013 9:57
 

While I have been listening to RP for several years, I never felt comfortable making a comment since I was one of the 'freeloaders' who listen but didn't donate. I just rectified the donation issue so I can make a comment about this and all Simon and Garfunkel songs we hear on this station.
A little over a year ago, I was invited to London with a friend who works in show business. We had many activities scheduled but there was one meal that stood out.We were invited to a dinner at a small home in central London owned by a well known artist. Nothing fancy. My friend and I along with four other people. I recognized one of the people right away since he is a very famous TV producer here in New York.While I was saying hello to him, a short fellow with whispy hair came up to me, shook my hand and said, "Hi. I'm Paul." It was Paul Simon. I fought the collapse of my knees and the tears that automatically came to my eyes and we all sat down at the kitchen table for a simple dinner. We talked all night (I work in healthcare and he has a particular interest in the field). He was funny, charming and made me feel like what I do was the most important thing in the world. An incredibly nice man who just seems so comfortable in his skin.
I got back to my hotel and stayed up all night listening to every song he wrote that happened to be on my ipad (most of his catalog). All I wanted to do is tell him how much his music meant to me as a child and teen. How I would listen to his records over and over until they were so worn that I knew when the next pop or skip would come up. Or how many times a tear would come to my eye when I realized the meaning of what he was singing and how I was convinced he was singing to me.
I've lived an amazing life and have met many famous people. But never a hero. I've thought about that dinner almost every day since. I hope  I continue to think of it every day of this life.
Geecheeboy
(under a crescent moon and palmetto tree)
Posted: Jan 03, 2013 9:29
 

 daedalus wrote:
 In the 60's , Mrs. Robinson was a hot piece of ass.
Today she's a dog.

... 

Especially considering she died in 2005.  Everybody is beautiful when they are young. Well, almost everybody.
WonderLizard
(2,755.46 mi. due east of Paradise)
Posted: Jan 03, 2013 9:18
 

 rdo wrote:
I like the Lemmonheads version better.  {#Foot-in-mouth}
 
This is not directed at you, rdo. However, I'm mounting a campaign for a level linguistic playing field on RP. The original "Mrs. Robinson" is this one by Simon and Garfunkel. The Lemonheads' version is a cover. I'm suggesting that we restrict the notion of "versions" to covers. And that the original is the original, not a "version." Adopting this convention will help resolve the confusion about which recording was the original and which was a cover—and there is a lot of confusion on these boards about too many songs.

I know, this has a snowball's chance in hell, but it sure felt good to get it out...{#Wink} 
Lazarus
(Bethany)
Posted: Jan 03, 2013 9:14
 



Everybody in my church loves this brilliant song...

 

midreaming
Posted: Nov 01, 2012 16:30
 


 The_Enemy wrote:

From Wikipedia:
MELF
In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Melf, also known as Prince Brightflame, is a grey elven archmage, and was originally a player character of Lucion Paul Gygax in Gary Gygax's home campaign. Melf is a native of the elven kingdom of Celene, and is recognized by many as the leader of the Knights of Luna.

Some people never outgrow D&D.
 
  if the geeks do truly inherit all of heaven and earth you should totally stick with that D&D thing.  Cause I don't think it's ever got a chance of being cool. On the down side, unlike with computers, you're not gonna get tons o' cash, the big house or the hot girls with it. But hey, all of heaven and earth ain't bad. 


rdo
(DC)
Posted: Oct 13, 2012 16:44
 

I like the Lemmonheads version better.  {#Foot-in-mouth}
devilturtle
Posted: Aug 30, 2012 17:34
 

RP is the best - but if you are looking for second best, rather than Pandora, you should check out Slacker.  It is way way way more customizable.  It is more driven by people rather than algorithms (you like Simon and Garfunkel's harmony - then here's one from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir - yeah, thanks Pandora!)

However, with both of those services, the commercials will drive you crazy, and hopefully back to RP, where you will make a donation to keep it ad free! Thanks RP {#Music}
   
socalhol wrote:
 peter_james_bond wrote:
He spoke blasphemy, Pandora sucks.


ziggytrix wrote:

Pandora is pretty dang neat.  It has its limitations, but it most certainly does not suck.

Pandora does suck.  You can usually find your favorite artists, and on occasion discover new artists on there, but not without some effort and patience.  If your tastes run “less mainstream” (which I’m guessing it would, otherwise you wouldn’t listen to RP) then Pandora struggles to match up similar artists / or peters out after an hour and wants you to input more suggestions.  If you have time to kill to play around with it, then fine.  If you’re trying to listen to music while doing other things, forget about it.  Plus you don’t get the awesome segues & themed sets that Bill is great at!    (though I do sometimes wish RP had a FFWD feature like Pandora)

 

MirageRF
(Clemmons, NC, USA)
Posted: Aug 11, 2012 15:48
 

My generation's music and I find it stale.  {#Sleep}
ziakut
(Right Here)
Posted: Jun 28, 2012 20:48
 

I. Love. This. Song.
DD gypsyman
(just passing through....)
Posted: Jun 09, 2012 12:38
 

fabric of our youth