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Tomasni
(Stockholm, Sweden)
Posted: Jun 10, 2018 12:16
 

8 - Most Excellent  to me
DocStrangelove
(Ottawa)
Posted: Jun 08, 2018 13:04
 

so much talent
in one man
so lucky we are
thewiseking
(New York, New York)
Posted: May 02, 2018 10:44
 

"like yer Daddy done", Um, I distinctly do not recall the suburban Jersey kids speaking in this manner. At this point, The Boss was inhabiting some sort of persona
dboseman
Posted: Apr 12, 2018 13:32
 

Perfect
msymmes
(Toronto, CA)
Posted: Feb 14, 2018 17:23
 

Godlike!
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Feb 06, 2018 13:09
 

 h8rhater wrote:
There doesn't need to be a "best", IMO.
 
Relax, Sparky.
h8rhater
(Couldn't care less why you h8 this song)
Posted: Feb 06, 2018 7:36
 

 RadioDoc wrote:

I don't get why many here cannot see either the historical perspective nor the cultural relevance of much of what is played here, but instead dissect each song in the vacuum of their own minds.

 
Vacuum indeed.
h8rhater
(Couldn't care less why you h8 this song)
Posted: Feb 06, 2018 7:31
 

 On_The_Beach wrote:
Great song, but not his best album, IMO.

 
There doesn't need to be a "best", IMO.
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Jan 17, 2018 18:34
 

Great song, but not his best album, IMO.
sfyi2001
(Seattle)
Posted: Dec 19, 2017 2:30
 

'Born to Run' worked somewhat anyway ~
andrea924
Posted: Dec 10, 2017 12:28
 

Springsteen wrote this about his older sister who got pregnant and married by 18. The real-life inspiration has a happier outcome: Over 40 years later, she and her husband are still married, happily, with multiple grandkids.
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Dec 10, 2017 12:27
 

 steeler wrote:
tapatia wrote:
Here's the thing: while the themes and stories of his songs may not be relevant to YOUR life, they resonate powerfully with the lives of a large part of America, especially in the areas where manufacturing jobs and farming constituted the livelihoods of the majority of the population. The hardships and heartbreaks of which he sings are representative of the experiences of thousands of working-class Americans who lost jobs, homes, families, and farms as manufacturing and production shipped overseas in favor of cheaper labor and lower operating costs. THAT'S why he's so popular and why so many people "swallow" his music - and why he has such a devoted following. He sings of things and real events that truly matter and that are near to the hearts and pains of many. What's your quarrel with that?
He sings of dreams pursued and lost, and sometimes recovered. He sings of redemption. I like those themes.

 
{#Yes}

good words 
sfyi2001
(Seattle)
Posted: Oct 11, 2017 3:29
 

Was in a Saratoga bar and a stranger called this song 'pathetic Jersey drivel', and I was all like - "DUDE ! - Are you from Joizee? - I'M FROM JOIZEE !!"
Tomasni
(Stockholm, Sweden)
Posted: Aug 07, 2017 1:09
 

8 - Most Excellent  to me
jerrieberrie
(Omaha)
Posted: Apr 10, 2017 15:19
 

 steeler wrote:
Is a dream a lie if it don't come true or is it something worse?

That line — alone — is worth the price of admission here.  Stops me dead in my tracks each and every time. Afraid to know the answer; afraid not to know.

Bard. Indeed.

 
this is a haunting line and knocks me into questions about life every time.   some people are born to write our stories.
SmackDaddy
(San Diego)
Posted: Jun 11, 2016 23:18
 

 RadioDoc wrote:

Taken in the context of when it was popular—during the failure of Rust Belt industry and the subsequent loss of thousands of good-paying jobs—it's a brilliant snapshot of what many teenagers faced as a future at the time. I don't get why many here cannot see either the historical perspective nor the cultural relevance of much of what is played here, but instead dissect each song in the vacuum of their own minds.
 
Excellent comment. To the same point from a different direction, I've always said that the worst thing to happen to Rock and Roll was that it got a history. When in reality RnR is at it's best when it's a reflection of the time in which it was written. This concept that a great rock song should be timeless is nonsense. RnR is written in the moment about the moment so when listening to older RnR one most consider the culture from which came.
JckTorance
(Boston)
Posted: Nov 20, 2013 13:45
 

{#Guitarist}

 
calypsus_1 wrote: 


calypsus_1
(East of Eden)
Posted: Jun 07, 2010 1:08
 


Bruce Springsteen - "The River" Live (on a street in Copenhagen with a street musician)




Rotterdam
Posted: Oct 23, 2009 3:46
 

 RadioDoc wrote:

Taken in the context of when it was popular—during the failure of Rust Belt industry and the subsequent loss of thousands of good-paying jobs—it's a brilliant snapshot of what many teenagers faced as a future at the time.

I don't get why many here cannot see either the historical perspective nor the cultural relevance of much of what is played here, but instead dissect each song in the vacuum of their own minds.
 

RadioDoc, I don't appreciate Springsteen's art - just a matter of taste. But I am very interested in your comment. Thank you for posting it.
peter_james_bond
(West Of The Burg)
Posted: Sep 21, 2009 13:44
 

 RadioDoc wrote:
Taken in the context of when it was popular—during the failure of Rust Belt industry and the subsequent loss of thousands of good-paying jobs—it's a brilliant snapshot of what many teenagers faced as a future at the time. I don't get why many here cannot see either the historical perspective nor the cultural relevance of much of what is played here, but instead dissect each song in the vacuum of their own minds.
 
{#Clap} Brilliant Comment!