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sdwright
(underwater)
Posted: Feb 08, 2018 16:17
 

And again. 

lily34 wrote:

wonderful. thank you.

 


Stephen_Phillips
(Hillsborough, Northern Ireland)
Posted: Feb 05, 2018 7:06
 

I always thought Buffalo Springfield was a place that this group named themselves after.

Wikipedia says that the group named themselves after a steam roller made by the Buffalo Springfield Steam Roller Company. 

Sure enough, they did exist and for lovers of all things steam-driven and old-timer American memorabilia here is a picture of one of the beasts...

Steam Roller

 
sfyi2001
(Seattle)
Posted: Jan 07, 2018 21:07
 







BCarn
(British Columbia)
Posted: Jun 09, 2017 14:23
 

Nope. For those with memories of a time when this came out, I get it. But Young's whining voice does the "chalk board squeal" for me.
Interesting song nevertheless. But a 5. 
coloradojohn
(Mihara, nestled in a cove on the SetoNaiKai, Japan)
Posted: Mar 09, 2017 23:50
 

I love this quintessentially trippy jamming masterpiece about The River of Life, the Endless Parade of Birth, Brightness, Fade, Return...
lily34
(GTFO)
Posted: Jan 07, 2017 12:37
 

 kurtster wrote:
This is one hell of a song and reading the comments made me reflect on it and the time and place.  So I went digging.  LA in 1967 was like no other.  Remembering events of the day back then, it made me think about the song Blue Jay Way.  Seems a confluence of events happened.  Broken Arrow was written the same time as BJW.  

My feeling is that both songs offer similar perspectives of the same awareness that happened that August in LA.  It was early in of what was becoming the observation that the lid had been lifted off of Pandora's Box and there was no going back.  We had lost our innocence forever and undeniably.  How it plays to listeners from other places and born later, I do not really know,  The comments offer some insight.

These are my thoughts from someone who was there then and what it means to me.  The Summer of Love was a short time when so much happened all at once.  1967 was imho, the greatest year of music we have ever seen.  These two songs are linked and until now, I never really gave it much thought.  

Ramblings from an old man who is grateful to have been lucky enough to have been in the eye of this hurricane, with all the joy and pain it brought.

 
wonderful. thank you.
westslope
(BC sage brush steppe)
Posted: Jan 07, 2017 12:37
 

 On_The_Beach wrote:
Thank you kurtster, for your insightful post below.

 
I'll second that.
Schmoogsley
Posted: Nov 07, 2016 6:25
 

Dirtbags always ruin a good thing. 
idiot_wind
Posted: Nov 07, 2016 6:23
 

What came first: this song or the Beatle's Sgt. Pepper?

sfyi2001
(Seattle)
Posted: Oct 07, 2016 0:18
 

This song reaches me in a way I can't really put into words.
It did the first time I heard it, and it does right now.
I don't know why.
I'm going to try and keep it that way as long as I can.



jab49
(Perth, Australia)
Posted: Oct 07, 2016 0:12
 

 kurtster wrote:
This is one hell of a song and reading the comments made me reflect on it and the time and place.  So I went digging.  LA in 1967 was like no other.  Remembering events of the day back then, it made me think about the song Blue Jay Way.  Seems a confluence of events happened.  Broken Arrow was written the same time as BJW.  

My feeling is that both songs offer similar perspectives of the same awareness that happened that August in LA.  It was early in of what was becoming the observation that the lid had been lifted off of Pandora's Box and there was no going back.  We had lost our innocence forever and undeniably.  How it plays to listeners from other places and born later, I do not really know,  The comments offer some insight.

These are my thoughts from someone who was there then and what it means to me.  The Summer of Love was a short time when so much happened all at once.  1967 was imho, the greatest year of music we have ever seen.  These two songs are linked and until now, I never really gave it much thought.  

Ramblings from an old man who is grateful to have been lucky enough to have been in the eye of this hurricane, with all the joy and pain it brought.

 
Post of the year, IMO. Worth another reply, I thought. Thanks Kurster.
idiot_wind
Posted: May 01, 2016 8:58
 

This band does not get enough credit for creating "trippy RnR". My goodness...they were creating this genre at the same time as the Beatles!  
westslope
(BC sage brush steppe)
Posted: Mar 30, 2016 10:32
 

Please play this path-breaking piece more often.
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Dec 26, 2015 16:02
 

thank you justin, this is so much more than music given the historic time frame of its creation, and still it's a great listening (imo :)
justin4kick
(The Netherlands)
Posted: Nov 25, 2015 6:51
 

Wikipedia on Broken Arrow:

"Broken Arrow" was confessional folk rock. It consists of three verses interspersed with snippets of sounds, featuring organ, a jazz combo with piano, bass, drums, and a clarinet. The song begins with audience applause (taken not from a Buffalo Springfield show, as some expect, but rather from a concert by the Beatles) and the opening of "Mr. Soul" (which opens the album) recorded live in the studio. The second verse begins with the sound of an audience booing, while the Calliope plays a strange version of the song "Take Me Out to the Ball Game", before some weird sound effects bring on the verse. There is also the sound of a military snare drum, that plays drum rolls, first quietly, and getting louder and louder, until the fifth time, an unusual sound effect brings the song to the third verse. The Jazz combo plays an improvisation, first taken up by the clarinet, and followed by the piano, until it fades out, whereas, we only hear the beating of a heart, until that fades out, too.
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Oct 25, 2015 11:33
 

Thank you kurtster, for your insightful post below.
kurtster
(drifting)
Posted: Oct 25, 2015 3:14
 

This is one hell of a song and reading the comments made me reflect on it and the time and place.  So I went digging.  LA in 1967 was like no other.  Remembering events of the day back then, it made me think about the song Blue Jay Way.  Seems a confluence of events happened.  Broken Arrow was written the same time as BJW.  

My feeling is that both songs offer similar perspectives of the same awareness that happened that August in LA.  It was early in of what was becoming the observation that the lid had been lifted off of Pandora's Box and there was no going back.  We had lost our innocence forever and undeniably.  How it plays to listeners from other places and born later, I do not really know,  The comments offer some insight.

These are my thoughts from someone who was there then and what it means to me.  The Summer of Love was a short time when so much happened all at once.  1967 was imho, the greatest year of music we have ever seen.  These two songs are linked and until now, I never really gave it much thought.  

Ramblings from an old man who is grateful to have been lucky enough to have been in the eye of this hurricane, with all the joy and pain it brought.
westslope
(BC sage brush steppe)
Posted: Sep 23, 2015 17:23
 

 pinem wrote:
Song is about 3 decades ahead of its time. Early Neil Young is so good; he made Buffalo Springfield and CSNY.

 
Agreed, agreed, agreed, .... 
Deadwing
(Cincinnati OH)
Posted: Aug 23, 2015 8:45
 

I agree 100% that this song is in another league from the typical tunes that were being written back then (not knocking them, certainly). They may have accidentally stumbled upon it, but it's certainly a novel in a song.

{#Cheers} 
coloradojohn
(Mihara, nestled in a cove on the SetoNaiKai, Japan)
Posted: Jun 21, 2015 20:44
 

God, this is so EPIC! At the time, it went right over everyones' heads, but that's okay, 'cause it's a pretty freakin' TIMELESS ENIGMA...