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lizardking
(700 miles north of Paradise)
Posted: Feb 09, 2018 10:56
 

Had I been alive in the 60s, I'm sure this album would have been therapy for some of the devastating shit that went down (wars (well, always war) assassinations, civil unrest, etc.) - and huh....listening to it just short of 2020 it's still THERAPY.  So thanks to S&G for helping us out, and to B&R for playing it here.  Long Live RP!!  And PEACE damn it!
stevenstarr
Posted: Jan 18, 2018 17:18
 

there are some songs that at the first note you turn up the volume . for me this one of them. Art garfunk adds nice vocals but Paul Simon is an American gem and a world treasure.so turn it up,sing along loud and proud and give thanks to be alive at a time when such wonder filled music came into being. Thanks RP for keeping it alive
westslope
(BC sage brush steppe)
Posted: Jan 18, 2018 17:11
 

 rdo wrote:


Dostoevsky and Gogol had similar critiques of the radicals of their time.  This was a major theme for them.  Few realize these were both quite reactionary writers.  Notes from the Underground is a classic example. Are you saying Simon and Garfunkel were reactionaries?  This makes a little more sense now. 

 
Reactionaries?  You mean like Bob Dylan?  (Another great critic of the counter-culture.)

westslope
(BC desert)
Posted: Dec 20, 2017 10:51
 

 On_The_Beach wrote:

The Sound of Silence?
Right artist, wrong song; go figger.

 
Right album though.
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Dec 13, 2017 18:42
 

 Tomasni wrote:
I came here with PSD  BUT I get only SILENCE
 
The Sound of Silence?
Right artist, wrong song; go figger.
Tomasni
(Stockholm, Sweden)
Posted: Dec 11, 2017 14:34
 

I came here with PSD  BUT I get only SILENCE
daigoro
Posted: Nov 20, 2017 19:58
 

I'm not normally into 60s music that much, but S&G are simply amazing.
rommesw
Posted: Oct 14, 2017 12:31
 

Paul Simon is one of the best songwriters ever in my opinion, this is one of the many outstanding ...
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Aug 14, 2017 8:41
 

 Cynaera wrote:
Back in about 1967 or 1968, I was living in Carson City, Nevada. My parents had a stereo/TV sales and repair business.  People would drop off record players, sometimes with the records still in them. I got "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones (my FIRST listen) and "I Am A Rock."  I kept the records, and no one ever mentioned the loss when they claimed their record-players.  I was too young to know then that what came in was what should go out.  (Silly me.)

That was also the first time I'd ever heard Simon and Garfunkel. It took some time, but I finally understood "deep."  I listened to this 45 countless times, and I think it was part of what led me to appreciate so many types of music.

I only wish Mom and Dad were still alive - I'd love to ask them about that time in our lives...

 
Godlike music, Beauty shared
sunflowerbee
(Hillsboro - somewhere in southern Ohio)
Posted: May 21, 2017 15:33
 

{#Music}
NoƩ
(Caen, France)
Posted: Apr 21, 2017 3:05
 

{#Beat}  {#Fever}
thewiseking
(New York, New York)
Posted: Dec 19, 2016 9:31
 

 jmsmy wrote:
Very DARK for 60's rock

 
idunno, plenty of darkness back then. Check out Mr Pharmacist, Primitive, Paint it Black and then give me a call. 
ElKay
(Greater NYC area)
Posted: Dec 19, 2016 9:27
 

When this came on just now, on Dec. 19, its first lines made me smile! Thanks.
NickDanger
(in absentia)
Posted: Dec 19, 2016 9:26
 

Perfect song for today.
Thanks, Bill and Rebecca! 
zivko
(toronto canada)
Posted: Nov 26, 2016 4:09
 

  wondewr the bm.deavenport613 wrote:

You lived Pat, you lived.

 
I wonder the same thing Pat

 
rsimark
Posted: Nov 18, 2016 21:25
 

 bm.deavenport613 wrote:

You lived Pat, you lived.

 
heard it on vinyl, am radio, FM, tapes, parents, streaming and it still draws me in.  
This is like poetry that stirs my memories from days gone by.  
Song has also lived, will live on.     

Drawn me in in unexpected ways.  Should be used to this RP effect, can't quite recall what I was doing yet drawn to what's  next.
Quite a set Bill!
bm.deavenport613
(Pensacola)
Posted: Oct 11, 2016 15:52
 

 Old_Pat wrote:
sigh........    1966......... howthehell did I get this old........
 

 
You lived Pat, you lived.
Old_Pat
(Scotland via Belgium, Germany and LA)
Posted: Sep 17, 2016 12:55
 

sigh........    1966......... howthehell did I get this old........
 
twoplain2sea
(After the gold rush by my friend Amphion.)
Posted: Aug 17, 2016 0:55
 

  I'm a rock
Go own dearest
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Jun 14, 2016 12:58
 

 CaffeineSam wrote:
Since when did rocks and islands start singing ?!

This is a fucked up world we live in...

 
I hope that your rhetorical question and statement reflect a snarky or misanthropic observation. If not, perhaps you've heard of widely used literary devices such as metaphors, analogies and symbolism. 
nutrod42
(San Francisco, CA, US)
Posted: Jun 14, 2016 12:52
 

Paul Simon used to write such great stuff.
colt4x5
(95.8 miles from Purgatory. (I measured it.))
Posted: May 13, 2016 12:12
 

In 7th grade music class, we tried to figure out how this worked with John Donne's "No Man Is An Island." 
We did not get far, but the experience set the tone for me for the rest of school - that ideas could be shared across the centuries, and that distant artists might engage in conversations.
Baby_M
(a 100+-year old building in downtown Akron, Ohio)
Posted: May 13, 2016 12:09
 

It would be neat to pair this with Warren Zevon's "Splendid Isolation."
justin4kick
(The Netherlands)
Posted: Apr 19, 2016 8:30
 

I think Al Kooper plays organ on this track. As he did superbly on so many other great songs. 
Peter_Bradshaw
(UK)
Posted: Apr 11, 2016 10:07
 

Stunning, truly stunning.  When Godlike is the only option.
LizK
(Houston, Texas)
Posted: Sep 28, 2015 9:23
 

 Chi_Editrix wrote:
You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.

 
Amen
jim1964
(1379 miles to Wall Drug)
Posted: Aug 03, 2015 20:37
 

 kingart wrote:
It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 

 
Got snowed in at Pat's Bar & Grill on Nostrard Ave by Kings Highway on a winters night years ago, we had lots of beer and just a jukebox, no RP at that time.
Jannne
(Tasmania 42 degrees South)
Posted: Jul 03, 2015 16:13
 

...my morning shines so brightly  {#Crown}
CaffeineSam
Posted: Jul 03, 2015 16:12
 

Since when did rocks and islands start singing ?!

This is a fucked up world we live in...
nagsheadlocal
(North Carolina, the new New Jersey)
Posted: May 01, 2015 10:58
 

 Chi_Editrix wrote:
You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.

 
Oh, I dunno, if I could spend an hour or two with the woman I was dating when I was 16 . . . 
Chi_Editrix
(Chi)
Posted: Mar 23, 2015 12:09
 

You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.
Josephhartgreen
(London, UK)
Posted: Feb 27, 2015 2:04
 

 kingart wrote:
It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 

 
{#Clap}
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Jan 26, 2015 16:19
 

It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 
Grammarcop
(Even The Simpsons make fun of where I live.)
Posted: Dec 19, 2014 6:06
 

On a deep and dark December day. 
Peter_Bradshaw
(Salisbury)
Posted: Mar 19, 2014 12:54
 

{#Dance}.... as good as it gets 10
dw
(PHill, CA)
Posted: Mar 19, 2014 12:44
 

CLASSIC!
Elroweho
(Cheesehead in Paradise)
Posted: Mar 19, 2014 12:43
 

"If I never loved I never would have cried" - no truer words were spoken!
LPCity
(Salt Lake City, Utah)
Posted: Nov 12, 2013 14:37
 

The first concert I ever saw, 10 years old!


ccjemmett
(Toronto)
Posted: Sep 10, 2013 19:56
 

 jmsmy wrote:
Very DARK for 60's rock

 
Hardly
rdo
(DC)
Posted: Aug 10, 2013 13:32
 

 unclehud wrote:
 
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?

  

No, I am not an island.  I love literature.  I derive great pleasure from it. I am a rational egoist in that regard.  Being around people bores me more and more, the older I get.  I am just not all that interested in what people have to say in person.  I am quite interested in what people write.  I am quite put off by the lyrics of this song because I don't like the association between literature and the island/rock.  That's fine, I guess, if one really cannot be around people, but I want literature to be much more culturally relevant than it is.  I want it to be quite normal and accepted to run off and read a serious book or poem, and then talk about it with others.  It should not be such a stigmatized activity.  This songs seems to harden those attitudes.


So...I went and read all the comments here.  There are many good comments here in support of the lyrics, which I applaud.  However, there was one commenter who seems to lend some support to my argument from none other than Paul Simon himself.  The following is culled from the Wikipedia entry for this song:

Until 1981, the initial official recording of "I Am a Rock" on The Paul Simon Song Book remained unavailable in North America. This was partly because Simon himself disdained the album, saying on the album's liner notes,

This L.P. contains twelve of the songs that I have written over the past two years. There are some here that I would not write today. I don't believe in them as I once did. I have included them because they played an important role in the transition. It is discomforting, almost painful, to look back over something someone else created and realize that someone else was you. I am not ashamed of where I've been and what I've thought. It's just not me anymore. It is perfectly clear to me that the songs I write today will not be mine tomorrow. I don't regret the loss.


  
oldsaxon
(Wales via Vancouver, BC.)
Posted: Aug 10, 2013 13:22
 

 unclehud wrote:
 
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?

 
I like what I like. I know many don't like these things, that's fair, but I like what I like and you can't dislike that I like them. Well, you can, but that's just life. That's what they are saying. You can't hurt me, because I'm strong in the things I know. 

Or maybe they're just saying we're all just fooling ourselves that things we like make us strong....and it's just bollox.

/cc NSA, GCHQ 
unclehud
(now 30 feet above the planet in King Abdullah Economic City)
Posted: Aug 03, 2013 13:40
 

 rdo wrote:
I listen to the lyrics of this song, and I don't like them.  My impression of the song is that it calls into question the joys of social isolation.  I think the social stigma of isolation is the problem.  It's that Invasion of the Body Snatchers look you get when you tell people you read poetry.   I like this song, but I definitely do not like its message.  Maybe I am hearing it wrong.  I'd be interested to hear other impressions...
 
But please, don't go reading into this statement some sort of observation about "status" or a cultural commentary about my own "class" or nationality or whatever perverse little notions you have in your mind.  This is a global observation of every human being.  
  
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?
rdo
(DC)
Posted: Aug 03, 2013 13:03
 

 westslope wrote:

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  



 

Dostoevsky and Gogol had similar critiques of the radicals of their time.  This was a major theme for them.  Few realize these were both quite reactionary writers.  Notes from the Underground is a classic example. Are you saying Simon and Garfunkel were reactionaries?  This makes a little more sense now. 
jmsmy
(Music Town, Klein, Texas)
Posted: Jul 02, 2013 17:06
 

Very DARK for 60's rock
melzabutch
(From Oz To the Eastern Shore MD)
Posted: Jul 02, 2013 17:04
 


Lazarus
(Bethany)
Posted: May 31, 2013 21:16
 

 westslope wrote:

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  

 

Thank you!  I be the holy ghost of big stud Romeo Tuma...  hope you are having a marvelous time...


love this song... 
black321
(A sunset in the desert)
Posted: Mar 05, 2013 14:04
 

where'd the boys dig up the lyrics for this one?  Sounds like something I would read on the wall of a Jr. High bathroom stall?
westslope
(BC coast)
Posted: Feb 26, 2013 12:46
 

 (former member) wrote:

Everybody in my hotel room be dancing...  love it...


 
 

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  


Pedro1874
(Newton-le-Willows, England)
Posted: Feb 02, 2013 6:15
 

 Easyrider wrote:
Simply beautiful and fills me with happiness after all these years.
 
Me too. {#Sunny}
rdo
(DC)
Posted: Dec 01, 2012 13:21
 

 MortimerS wrote:

Angst is universal as far as age is concerned. At least that is what I have observed. A burden is a burden is a burden to bear. That doesn't stop an old fhart from laughing in your pimply face or a youngster sneering at your old crickety legs or leathery countenance though. I first heard this when my mean sister bought it way way back when it was fresh and new. She isn't mean to me anymore though we are both getting old and crickety now, so maybe it was my angst that made her seem so.
 
I listen to the lyrics of this song, and I don't like them.  My impression of the song is that it calls into question the joys of social isolation.  I think the social stigma of isolation is the problem.  It's that Invasion of the Body Snatchers look you get when you tell people you read poetry.   I like this song, but I definitely do not like its message.  Maybe I am hearing it wrong.  I'd be interested to hear other impressions...
 
But please, don't go reading into this statement some sort of observation about "status" or a cultural commentary about my own "class" or nationality or whatever perverse little notions you have in your mind.  This is a global observation of every human being.