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jmsmy
(Music Town, Klein, Texas)
Posted: Feb 16, 2018 12:18
 

...And if you do a few more American Tours - you'll write a masterpiece about it.
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: Feb 01, 2018 20:42
 

 kingart wrote:
Quick, send me a song with better or more ironic lyrics. 

I'm waiting.....

That's what I thought.
 
Well be-bop-a-Lula she's my baby
Be-bop-a-Lula I don't mean maybe
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Jan 04, 2018 10:19
 

Quick, send me a song with better or more ironic lyrics. 

I'm waiting.....

That's what I thought.

coloradojohn
(Looking up at The Flatirons, Boulder, Colorado)
Posted: Dec 05, 2017 23:57
 

This was an interesting period for PF, because it seemed that by then none of them were holding anything back. It was as if they were really confident that they were out from under the shadow of being Syd's band, free at last from trying to maintain or mimic such a fissile and tragic psychedelic trajectory, and they were exploring what they could do on the merits of their own creativity. Waters' lyrics and arrangements became more dramatic and narrative, more insightful and mature, and Gilmour's guitar was more often satisfyingly throaty and saturated, even when not the center of attention. While they were still really all over the place on this record, in spots in Childhood's End, I hear clear hints of the symphonic scope and tightly focused grandeur of their next album, Dark Side of the Moon.
Caravan66
Posted: Nov 21, 2017 6:50
 

Pure genius and a gem of an album. Many a happy hour humming along to this.....
Wilfrue
(The space between your reality and my dreams)
Posted: Sep 21, 2017 12:37
 

 Prius wrote:
Perfectly links with "Spirit in the sky", by Norman Greenbaum.

 
That was my thought... "Is this a Norman Greenbaum song?" It took me a second to place it. Nice to hear a gem. One of the reasons I stick with RP.
RiverGuide
(The Lehigh river)
Posted: Sep 21, 2017 12:35
 

Love it! Always been a favorite.

{#Bananajam}
Wardleader
(Philadelphia USA)
Posted: Jun 21, 2017 12:59
 

{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana_2}{#Music}{#Bananasplit}{#Dancingbanana}{#Bananapiano}{#Group-hug}{#Drummer}{#Dance}
rpdevotee
(San Jose, CA)
Posted: May 22, 2017 2:45
 

Great song {#Skull}
lizardking
(about an 11 hour drive south to Paradise)
Posted: Apr 21, 2017 14:28
 

 konakid wrote:
Love this track! Always have and always will. Any true Floyd fan would too. To all you nay sayers I say get off your high horse. This is just as classic as any other Floyd. Get a life and quit your dam bitchin'.    {#Naughty}

 
I agree almost completely with what you say, although really, to each their own, right?  I understand you like it because so do I and I get that.  Having watched the film (which I liked better than the reviews it got) and understanding the "Obscured by Clouds" reference, I also understand how this song fit in to the film.  I did see the film after knowing (and really liking) the song - I was well known for cranking this on my awesome car stereo, and making people try to guess who this was. 

10 on this song for me. 


ojibwe
Posted: Apr 21, 2017 14:19
 

 WonderLizard wrote:
First, the Ramones started out as a Bay City Rollers bubble gum pop band—check out this week's ish of Rolling Stone with the Ramones on the cover. Second, I think it's highly likely that Donald Trump learned the art of the comb-over from Don Kirshner.
 
The Ramones were from Queens.

The Rollers were from Scotland.

Aye laddie, ye be off by a few thousand miles. 
hayduke2
(Southampton, NY)
Posted: Mar 13, 2017 19:21
 

 Whoa Kool! Great seeing Rachel Maddow in her Big Hair days, hmmmm baby shake it!!!

Proclivities wrote:

dancin'

 


Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Mar 06, 2017 12:04
 

 kingart wrote:
Great stuff. 

But I hear Norman Greenbaum and Spirit in the Sky, which preceded this by 3 years. 

When I die and they lay me to rest 
Gonna go to the place that's the best....
 
dancin'
Prius
(Sant Quirze near Barcelona (Spain))
Posted: Mar 06, 2017 12:03
 

Perfectly links with "Spirit in the sky", by Norman Greenbaum.
gmichaelt
(45° 28' N / 73° 36' W)
Posted: Feb 03, 2017 18:04
 

 HazzeSwede wrote:
Great song,some people must be out of focus!

Everything's bokeh. Nothing to worry about.

I'll stop.
konakid
(Champlin, MN.)
Posted: Jan 19, 2017 14:01
 

      Dam right!! Relayer wrote:
I always loved this album.  Not your usual PF album, but it was still an incredible album. The band always seemed to have a different approach when doing soundtracks as opposed to their other albums.

One great trivia bit about this album I learned from reading Nick Mason's book was that they were busy recording DSotM, and took a "break" to travel to the south of France to write and record this album.  Think about that...they needed a break from the demands of DSotM, and their idea of a break was to go to France and record a soundtrack album.  Work ethic there.

 


konakid
(Champlin, MN.)
Posted: Jan 19, 2017 13:59
 

Love this track! Always have and always will. Any true Floyd fan would too. To all you nay sayers I say get off your high horse. This is just as classic as any other Floyd. Get a life and quit your dam bitchin'.    {#Naughty}
NakedBatman
(San Clemente CA)
Posted: Sep 21, 2016 16:29
 

 SmackDaddy wrote:

Excuse me, but where did you come up with this nonsense?

The Ramones began playing gigs in mid-1974, with their first show at Performance Studios in New York City. The band, performing in a style similar to the one used on their debut album, typically performed at clubs in downtown Manhattan, specifically CBGB and Max's Kansas City. In early 1975, Lisa Robinson, an editor of Hit Parader and Rock Scene, saw the fledgling Ramones performing at CBGB and subsequently wrote about the band in several magazine issues. The group's vocalist Joey Ramone related that "Lisa came down to see us, she was blown away by us. She said that we changed her life, She started writing about us in Rock Scene, and then Lenny Kaye would write about us and we started getting more press like The Village Voice. Word was getting out, and people starting coming down." Convinced that the band needed a recording contract, Robinson contacted Danny Fields, former manager of the Stooges, and argued that he needed to manage the band. Fields agreed because the band "had everything ever liked," and became the manager in November 1975.

On September 19, 1975, the Ramones recorded a demo at 914 Sound Studios, which was produced by Marty Thau. Featuring the songs "Judy Is a Punk" and "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend," the band used the demo to showcase their style to prospective labels. Producer Craig Leon, who had seen the Ramones perform in the summer of 1975, brought the demo to the attention of Sire Records' president Seymour Stein. After being persuaded by Craig Leon and his ex-wife Linda Stein, the Ramones auditioned at Sire and were offered a contract, although the label had previously signed only European progressive rock bands. Drummer Tommy Ramone recalled: "Craig Leon is the one who got us signed, single handed. He brought down the vice president and all these people—he's the only hip one in the company. He risked his career to get us on the label." The label offered to release "You're Gonna Kill That Girl" as a single, but the band declined, insisting on recording an entire album. Sire accepted their request and agreed to release a studio album instead.



 


Jeff_Guinn
Posted: Aug 17, 2016 10:51
 

The memories of a man in his old age
Are the deeds of a man in his prime 

presage 

The sun is the same in a relative way but you're older,
Shorter of breath and one day closer to death.

Amazingly prescient for men so young. 


AhhtheMusic
Posted: Aug 01, 2016 11:37
 

 kingart wrote:
Great stuff. 

But I hear Norman Greenbaum and Spirit in the Sky, which preceded this by 3 years. 

When I die and they lay me to rest 
Gonna go to the place that's the best....

 

 
And BECAUSE I hear Spirit in the Sky ALL OVER IT - I have to give it a 1.  Sounds like a total rip off to me.
GreenKittenLines
(Kingston, mon)
Posted: Jul 16, 2016 20:35
 

 joempie wrote:

yeah, and t-rex. i gave it a 3, my lowest PF rating ever...

 
Sorry to report the same here 
SmackDaddy
(San Diego)
Posted: May 29, 2016 16:54
 

 WonderLizard wrote:

First, the Ramones started out as a Bay City Rollers bubble gum pop band—check out this week's ish of Rolling Stone with the Ramones on the cover. Second, I think it's highly likely that Donald Trump learned the art of the comb-over from Don Kirshner.

 
Excuse me, but where did you come up with this nonsense?

The Ramones began playing gigs in mid-1974, with their first show at Performance Studios in New York City. The band, performing in a style similar to the one used on their debut album, typically performed at clubs in downtown Manhattan, specifically CBGB and Max's Kansas City. In early 1975, Lisa Robinson, an editor of Hit Parader and Rock Scene, saw the fledgling Ramones performing at CBGB and subsequently wrote about the band in several magazine issues. The group's vocalist Joey Ramone related that "Lisa came down to see us, she was blown away by us. She said that we changed her life, She started writing about us in Rock Scene, and then Lenny Kaye would write about us and we started getting more press like The Village Voice. Word was getting out, and people starting coming down." Convinced that the band needed a recording contract, Robinson contacted Danny Fields, former manager of the Stooges, and argued that he needed to manage the band. Fields agreed because the band "had everything ever liked," and became the manager in November 1975.

On September 19, 1975, the Ramones recorded a demo at 914 Sound Studios, which was produced by Marty Thau. Featuring the songs "Judy Is a Punk" and "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend," the band used the demo to showcase their style to prospective labels. Producer Craig Leon, who had seen the Ramones perform in the summer of 1975, brought the demo to the attention of Sire Records' president Seymour Stein. After being persuaded by Craig Leon and his ex-wife Linda Stein, the Ramones auditioned at Sire and were offered a contract, although the label had previously signed only European progressive rock bands. Drummer Tommy Ramone recalled: "Craig Leon is the one who got us signed, single handed. He brought down the vice president and all these people—he's the only hip one in the company. He risked his career to get us on the label." The label offered to release "You're Gonna Kill That Girl" as a single, but the band declined, insisting on recording an entire album. Sire accepted their request and agreed to release a studio album instead.


Relayer
(Gainesville, FL)
Posted: Apr 27, 2016 14:44
 

I always loved this album.  Not your usual PF album, but it was still an incredible album. The band always seemed to have a different approach when doing soundtracks as opposed to their other albums.

One great trivia bit about this album I learned from reading Nick Mason's book was that they were busy recording DSotM, and took a "break" to travel to the south of France to write and record this album.  Think about that...they needed a break from the demands of DSotM, and their idea of a break was to go to France and record a soundtrack album.  Work ethic there.
WonderLizard
(2,755.46 mi. due east of Paradise)
Posted: Apr 11, 2016 20:11
 

 kcar wrote:

You have to put Bay City Rollers at or near the top of that list. England should have split from Scotland right then and there. 

My God, the True Sign of The Apocalypse: A Bay City Rollers' reunion

The US had its share of crap bands from the 70s and bad music shows. "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" came on after SNL at around Sunday 1 am and it wasn't nearly good enough for that time slot. 

 
First, the Ramones started out as a Bay City Rollers bubble gum pop band—check out this week's ish of Rolling Stone with the Ramones on the cover. Second, I think it's highly likely that Donald Trump learned the art of the comb-over from Don Kirshner.
blueheronobx
(Southern Shores North Carolina)
Posted: Feb 08, 2016 12:54
 

Probably my favorite Pink Floyd song.
 
jbunniii
(San Jose, CA)
Posted: Jan 07, 2016 22:08
 

Nice! I don't think I have ever heard this before on any radio station or stream. Roger Waters almost sounds cheerful for once, especially if you don't listen to the words.
tmscahill
(United States)
Posted: Nov 06, 2015 6:29
 

Meddle, Obscured, Saucer, Atom... Anytime Bill you play deep tracks from PF it is fantastic! 
dwhayslett
(Pawleys Island, SC)
Posted: Nov 06, 2015 6:24
 

 daveinnj wrote:


Good Grief, Did Greenbaum steal this?? It's the same beat, and the same theme - both would make excellent Funeral Songs.

 
That would be an interesting trick, stealing something 3 years before it was around.
daveinnj
Posted: Oct 21, 2015 10:16
 

 kingart wrote:

Great stuff. 

But I hear Norman Greenbaum and Spirit in the Sky, which preceded this by 3 years. 

When I die and they lay me to rest 
Gonna go to the place that's the best....

 

 
Good Grief, Did Greenbaum steal this?? It's the same beat, and the same theme - both would make excellent Funeral Songs.
jhorton
(Trailer Park on Cape Cod)
Posted: Aug 19, 2015 16:58
 

Just thinking...okay song, not great, but this really marks the beginning of the searing guitar tone that DG would have mastered by 1975. 

More random thoughts, but who else was playing lead on a strat like this in '72? Jimi was dead,  Clapton was messing about with them in the early '70's but everyone else was playing Les pauls. Beck, Santana, Duane Allman, Page...

By the time he'd got it sorted out the way he liked it, it wasn't anything like a stock strat sound, but he'd figured out how to get the limitless sustain of the Gibsons, but with the bite of the single coils at the beginning of the note, that red hot attack....
stunix
(You have to rate the bad ones to make the good ones you rated count.)
Posted: Jun 18, 2015 2:50
 

Bless Rog, he can always make an up tempo 3 chord ditty sound depressing!
h8rhater
Posted: Mar 31, 2015 4:46
 

 kcar wrote:

You have to put Bay City Rollers at or near the top of that list. England should have split from Scotland right then and there. 

My God, the True Sign of The Apocalypse: A Bay City Rollers' reunion

The US had its share of crap bands from the 70s and bad music shows. "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" came on after SNL at around Sunday 1 am and it wasn't nearly good enough for that time slot. 

 
Yeah... Don Kirshner's rock concert, which was noted for only allowing true live performances, sucked.  Only the following never-heard- of crappy artists appeared live on the program during it's 8 year run on late night: 
ABBA The Allman Brothers Band Ambrosia Andy Gibb Argen tAverage White Band Bad Company Badfinger Bachman-Turner Overdrive Black Sabbath Brownsville Station Joan Baez Bee Gees Pat Benatar Black Oak Arkansas Blood, Sweat & Tears Blue Öyster Cult Brooklyn Dreams David Bowie The Byrds Harry Chapin Cheap Trick Alice Cooper Jim Croce Sarah Dash Devo Dixie Dregs The Doobie Brothers Eagles Earth, Wind & Fire Edgar Winter Group Electric Light Orchestra Bryan Ferry Fleetwood Mac FoghatRory Gallagher Golden Earring Grand Funk Railroad The Guess Who George Harrison The Hollies Billy Joel Journey James Gang Kansas B. B. King KISS Gladys Knight and the Pips Lake Lenny Williams Lynyrd SkynyrdM ahavishnu Orchestra Mahogany Rush Meatloaf Melissa Manchester Manfred Mann's Earth Band Frank Marino Don McLean Molly Hatchet Montrose Mother's Finest Maria Muldaur New York Dolls Ted Nugent Gary Numan Ohio Players Outlaws Robert Palmer The Police Billy Preston Prince & The Revolution Pure Prairie League with Vince Gill Ramones Lou Rawls Rainbow Helen Reddy REO Speedwagon The Rolling Stones Linda Ronstadt Todd Rundgren Rush Rose Royce Santana The Sex Pistols Seals & Crofts Sensational Alex Harvey Band Slade Jimmy Hendrix Slave Sly & the Family Stone Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes Sylvester Sparks The Stampeders Starz Steely Dan Steppenwolf Steve Miller Band Stephanie Mills Cat Stevens Switch Bram Tchaikovsky The Temptations Marc Bolan and T. Rex Ike & Tina Turner UFO Uriah Heep Village People Joe WalshVan Morrison Walter Murphy War Waylon Jennings Weather Report Wishbone Ash Stevie Wonder

DavidS_UK
(Central England, UK)
Posted: Mar 31, 2015 4:38
 

 DaidyBoy wrote:

There were loads, too many to mention.  Top of The Pops was godawful rubbish at times, particularly watching it now on BBC iPlayer.  If you really want to see what a farce British TV was back then, look up some of the old episodes on the 'net.  The "audience" look like they have been press-ganged.  No wonder we have issues.

 
The audience were worried!  They knew what was going on in the background/after the show (but no-one in authority wanted or cared to know).
joempie
(Switzerland)
Posted: Mar 15, 2015 1:46
 

 kingart wrote:
Great stuff. 

But I hear Norman Greenbaum and Spirit in the Sky, which preceded this by 3 years. 

When I die and they lay me to rest 
Gonna go to the place that's the best....

 

 
yeah, and t-rex. i gave it a 3, my lowest PF rating ever...
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Feb 11, 2015 12:47
 

Great stuff. 

But I hear Norman Greenbaum and Spirit in the Sky, which preceded this by 3 years. 

When I die and they lay me to rest 
Gonna go to the place that's the best....

 
Delawhere
Posted: Feb 11, 2015 12:45
 

I manged to make it all the way through Mushaboom and then this. Now that's redemption!
DaidyBoy
(Bristol, UK)
Posted: Jan 27, 2015 3:15
 

 kcar wrote:

You have to put Bay City Rollers at or near the top of that list. England should have split from Scotland right then and there. 

My God, the True Sign of The Apocalypse: A Bay City Rollers' reunion

The US had its share of crap bands from the 70s and bad music shows. "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" came on after SNL at around Sunday 1 am and it wasn't nearly good enough for that time slot. 

 
Ha ha. We gave Scotland their chance to cut and run but they bottled. Good luck to them.

ps I just looked at this link and was devastated to realise that I remembered all their names.  Hells teeth.
kcar
Posted: Dec 10, 2014 21:31
 

 DaidyBoy wrote:

There were loads, too many to mention.  Top of The Pops was godawful rubbish at times, particularly watching it now on BBC iPlayer.  If you really want to see what a farce British TV was back then, look up some of the old episodes on the 'net.  The "audience" look like they have been press-ganged.  No wonder we have issues.

 
You have to put Bay City Rollers at or near the top of that list. England should have split from Scotland right then and there. 

My God, the True Sign of The Apocalypse: A Bay City Rollers' reunion

The US had its share of crap bands from the 70s and bad music shows. "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" came on after SNL at around Sunday 1 am and it wasn't nearly good enough for that time slot. 


Baby_M
(a 100+-year old building in downtown Akron, Ohio)
Posted: Nov 25, 2014 13:13
 

 james_of_tucson wrote:
When they were doing work for spaghetti western soundtracks, . . . .

 
This album was the soundtrack for a French art film called La Vallée which is set in New Guinea.  Might be more accurate to call it an "escargot Southwest-Pacific western" than a "spaghetti western."

Do wish you'd add "The Gold Is In The..." from the same album to the playlist.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Sep 08, 2014 3:42
 

 james_of_tucson wrote:
When they were doing work for spaghetti western sountracks, they freely admitted to not putting 100% into the efforts.  This track comes from that period.  The song has some fantastic elements, but didn't get re-worked like their better material did.  

It's funny to see people criticize a group like Pink Floyd, whose main contribution was to alter the definition of "success" a few times :-)

 
No one is beyond criticism.
LowPhreak
(Divided Corporate States of Neo-Feudal Murikka, Inc.)
Posted: Jul 23, 2014 12:19
 

 DaidyBoy wrote:

There were loads, too many to mention.  Top of The Pops was godawful rubbish at times, particularly watching it now on BBC iPlayer.  If you really want to see what a farce British TV was back then, look up some of the old episodes on the 'net.  The "audience" look like they have been press-ganged.  No wonder we have issues.

 
{#Lol}
hallogallo
(Raleigh, NC)
Posted: Jul 07, 2014 15:16
 



1972 ...

Sonically, this tune was slightly ahead of its time.

... and the lyrics are great!



Life is a short, warm moment
And death is a long cold rest.




ckcotton
(Adding snarky comments since 2007)
Posted: Jul 07, 2014 15:13
 

Never hear this enough, even after all these years....
DaidyBoy
(Bristol, UK)
Posted: Jun 06, 2014 6:53
 

 treatment_bound wrote:

Never saw Top of the Pops, as it didn't make it across the pond.  Wish it would have, however. All we ever got on Thursday nights in the early seventies was crap like (the original) "Ironside".

What were some of the other UK "joke bands" (in your estimation) who graced your telly back then? 

 
There were loads, too many to mention.  Top of The Pops was godawful rubbish at times, particularly watching it now on BBC iPlayer.  If you really want to see what a farce British TV was back then, look up some of the old episodes on the 'net.  The "audience" look like they have been press-ganged.  No wonder we have issues.
DaidyBoy
(Bristol, UK)
Posted: Jun 06, 2014 6:50
 

 On_The_Beach wrote:

Damn, I always kinda liked this song, but now that big farting synthesizer sound kinda puts me in the mind of Monty Python. Can't you just see Eric Idle and Co. stumbling around like idiots with this song as soundtrack? OK, maybe it's just me.

 
Ha Ha.  Like the ones where Status Quo, Chas and Dave and all those old farts used to think they were funny arseing about with Dave Lee Travis and Jimmy Savile.  Oops, not so funny now, are they?

This is a dreadful song. 
On_The_Beach
(The Blue Planet)
Posted: May 05, 2014 23:02
 

 DaidyBoy wrote:

and me.  Dreadful. Reminds me of those horrible joke bands that used to appear on Top of The Pops on Thursday evenings in the 70's.

 
Damn, I always kinda liked this song, but now that big farting synthesizer sound kinda puts me in the mind of Monty Python. Can't you just see Eric Idle and Co. stumbling around like idiots with this song as soundtrack? OK, maybe it's just me.
james_of_tucson
(Tucson AZ)
Posted: Apr 20, 2014 13:07
 

When they were doing work for spaghetti western sountracks, they freely admitted to not putting 100% into the efforts.  This track comes from that period.  The song has some fantastic elements, but didn't get re-worked like their better material did.  

It's funny to see people criticize a group like Pink Floyd, whose main contribution was to alter the definition of "success" a few times :-)
treatment_bound
(Duluth to Madison)
Posted: Apr 04, 2014 16:13
 

 DaidyBoy wrote:

and me.  Dreadful. Reminds me of those horrible joke bands that used to appear on Top of The Pops on Thursday evenings in the 70's.

 
Never saw Top of the Pops, as it didn't make it across the pond.  Wish it would have, however. All we ever got on Thursday nights in the early seventies was crap like (the original) "Ironside".

What were some of the other UK "joke bands" (in your estimation) who graced your telly back then? 
evermovingtarget
(Burlington, Canada)
Posted: Apr 04, 2014 12:54
 

As sad as Syd's fate was, I think Pink Floyd improved dramatically after him. Just my opinion of course, but Pink Floyd headed by Waters and Gilmour is just brilliant. This one, not so much. Just another band from the late 60s/ early 70s.... Gilmour's guitar playing was great even here though. Good thing that didn't change too much, but rather kept on improving!
merkin_muffley
(Down the rabbit hole.....)
Posted: Feb 16, 2014 6:20
 

Damn Gilmour still shows his chops even on their obscure stuff. New PF tune for me.