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Emwolb
(Joisey)
Posted: Jan 31, 2018 11:34
 

 thewiseking wrote:
This was it. The beginning of the end for Clapton. A competent electric blues guitarist in his day.

 
Yeah....Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs just sucked !!!
torsim
(Denmark)
Posted: Jan 31, 2018 11:26
 

Jack Bruce was a far better singer as well as songwriter
gmsingh123
Posted: Dec 04, 2017 14:20
 

 thewiseking wrote:
This was it. The beginning of the end for Clapton. A competent electric blues guitarist in his day.

 
Just because the music was written to be radio friendly doesn't mean it can't be great.
WhiteWater
(right where you are sitting now)
Posted: Sep 04, 2017 11:32
 

 thewiseking wrote:
This was it. The beginning of the end for Clapton. A competent electric blues guitarist in his day.

 
You don't think his later return to Blues warrants any attention? I think that From the Cradle is an excellent album, as is his collaboration album with B.B. King...
LowPhreak
(Divided Corporate States of Neo-Feudal Murikka, Inc.)
Posted: Aug 18, 2017 23:08
 

 gatorade wrote:
Carl Radle killed it on bass. {#Bananajam}

 
{#Yes}
gatorade
(Peninsuland)
Posted: Aug 04, 2017 20:04
 

Carl Radle killed it on bass. {#Bananajam}
thewiseking
(New York, New York)
Posted: Feb 02, 2017 5:54
 

This was it. The beginning of the end for Clapton. A competent electric blues guitarist in his day.
IndyDoug
(Indianapolis)
Posted: Feb 02, 2017 5:53
 

Brilliant...
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Nov 02, 2016 7:22
 

 fredriley wrote:
Look at the collars on that shirt! Large collars were fashionable in those days, but those are de trop, proper elephant's ears.

The title of this song somewhat salaciously makes me think of 'golden showers' and 'water sports'...

 
Yikes. This is a blues piece in the up tempo. No need to bring skavy gravy into the song subject's sorrow.  I'll just play my air guitar. 
drewd
(In an office by the bay..... without a window)
Posted: Aug 31, 2016 12:18
 

Very fitting for us here on the gulf coast of Florida today.
SquiddlyDiddly
(I used to be a 'Poacher' but have reincarnated as a 1960s cartoon character)
Posted: Aug 18, 2015 5:37
 

 fredriley wrote:
Look at the collars on that shirt! Large collars were fashionable in those days, but those are de trop, proper elephant's ears.

The title of this song somewhat salaciously makes me think of 'golden showers' and 'water sports'...
 
Salacious indeed and slightly revealing that such a subject popped into your mind. . . of course, the elephant ears collars were designed with mopping up in mind. 
Babette55
Posted: Aug 18, 2015 5:35
 

One of the best tunes, EVER!!!!
h8rhater
Posted: Apr 14, 2015 7:00
 

 Dosequis wrote:

John Mayer????? Nope.

 
Actually..... Yep! 

He is an amazing axeman in the tradition of JJ Cale and Mr. Clapton.  If they were around, he could also confidently stand on the stage and trade licks with Hendrix and Vaughn.  The more you know...
randyblew
(Raleigh, NC)
Posted: Apr 14, 2015 7:00
 

To all of you in California - I hope you get plenty of it, soon. As a former denizen of both NoCal and SoCal, you have my support.

Also, wonderful song by EC.


fredriley
(Nottingham, UK)
Posted: Jun 12, 2014 7:46
 

Look at the collars on that shirt! Large collars were fashionable in those days, but those are de trop, proper elephant's ears.

The title of this song somewhat salaciously makes me think of 'golden showers' and 'water sports'...
Dosequis
Posted: Apr 10, 2014 16:28
 

 SmileOnADog wrote:
Super tasty tune.  Had the good fortune to sit 3rd row center in Phoenix for his show last week, very decent show to open the tour heading up to Crossroads in NYC, with nice slide work from Doyle Bramhall, the awesome drumming of Steve Jordan, and nice organ work and vocals from Paul Carrack, who sang on Mike (Rutherford) and the Mechanics' "The Living Years".  Clapton termed the middle 3rd or so of the set "the Robert Johnson segment"...was pleasantly surprised to get that solid a dose of some really sweet blues stuff leveraging Jordan (who anchors John Mayer in his Blues Trio format with Pino Palladino on bass).  Opening act was the The Wallflowers, also well worth seeing.  Next stop JM in October, who is not a big fave here on RP but not a bad player and a lot of fun live.

 
John Mayer????? Nope.
westslope
(BC coast)
Posted: Apr 10, 2014 16:26
 

 martinc wrote:
I remember jamming with this bass player many moons ago. This was the one song he kept on trying to get me to play but I had never heard it. All he had was this bass line and I really like it but just couldn't fill it in

 
Did you ever learn the song?
NoEnzLefttoSplit
Posted: Jan 05, 2014 10:39
 

 calypsus_1 wrote:

Eric Claptonby ~Thubakabra
©2012-2013 ~Thubakabra

A commission for a friend. :)
B4 new paper, graphite pencils.




 
I think this might be your best yet. Just pops out at you. And the brooding troubled posture fits him perfectly.
Fotay
Posted: Oct 02, 2013 18:41
 

 Fotay wrote:


 
Anyone else
in Pittsburgh. Early 70s in Civic Arena.  Clapton played this . Roof opened and it rained.  
Fotay
Posted: Oct 02, 2013 18:39
 

calypsus_1
(East of Eden)
Posted: Sep 01, 2013 11:48
 


Eric Claptonby ~Thubakabra
©2012-2013 ~Thubakabra

A commission for a friend. :)
B4 new paper, graphite pencils.



DanFHiggins
(Mid Maryland)
Posted: Aug 01, 2013 5:35
 

Whew.

Always loved this tune. 
CrackerjaxATX
(ATX)
Posted: May 29, 2013 13:21
 

 gold in texas!!
stephw wrote:
{#Daisy} what's a little rain!

 

stephw
(From The Great White North)
Posted: May 29, 2013 13:19
 

{#Daisy} what's a little rain!
SmileOnADog
(Arizona)
Posted: Mar 27, 2013 17:33
 

Super tasty tune.  Had the good fortune to sit 3rd row center in Phoenix for his show last week, very decent show to open the tour heading up to Crossroads in NYC, with nice slide work from Doyle Bramhall, the awesome drumming of Steve Jordan, and nice organ work and vocals from Paul Carrack, who sang on Mike (Rutherford) and the Mechanics' "The Living Years".  Clapton termed the middle 3rd or so of the set "the Robert Johnson segment"...was pleasantly surprised to get that solid a dose of some really sweet blues stuff leveraging Jordan (who anchors John Mayer in his Blues Trio format with Pino Palladino on bass).  Opening act was the The Wallflowers, also well worth seeing.  Next stop JM in October, who is not a big fave here on RP but not a bad player and a lot of fun live.
DD gypsyman
(just passing through....)
Posted: Feb 24, 2013 6:34
 

 jim1964 wrote:
This has always been my absolute favorite Clapton tune, nice piano as well...Nicky Hopkins?
 
I think its Leon Russell. And the guitar solo in the middle is Stephen Stills.
kurtster
(Back in Ohiya, for now ...)
Posted: Feb 24, 2013 6:25
 

 jim1964 wrote:
This has always been my absolute favorite Clapton tune, nice piano as well...Nicky Hopkins?
 

Leon Russell.
palatin8
(KÂŽtown, Germany)
Posted: Dec 23, 2012 14:34
 

What an uninsprired set so far. It must be raining in Paradise.
jim1964
(1379 miles to Wall Drug)
Posted: Oct 21, 2012 21:12
 

This has always been my absolute favorite Clapton tune, nice piano as well...Nicky Hopkins?
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Sep 17, 2012 12:42
 

I'e heard this a zillion times. FM, my iPod, bars. Somehow, unlike many other equally classic tunes, it never grows tiresome. And that bass line is killer. 
 
coding_to_music
(Beantown)
Posted: Jul 19, 2012 10:36
 

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/carl-radle-mn0000792981

From late 1970 until the end of that decade, Carl Radle was one of the top bassists in rock music. He began the decade as a star on his instrument by virtue of his membership in the short-lived legendary band Derek & the Dominos, alongside Eric Clapton and yoked to drummer Jim Gordon in an outstanding rhythm section — but it was the sheer quality of his work that had led him to that point and sustained him for years after. Born in Oklahoma City in 1942, he reached his teens just as the rock & roll boom began. By the early '60s, he'd made his way to California, where he played for a time as a member of Skip & the Flips, a group organized by future Byrd Skip Battin, playing alongside drummer Billy Mundi. He entered the orbit of his fellow Oklahoman Leon Russell and played numerous sessions for him during the latter's days as an arranger — although uncredited, Radle played on many recordings for Gary Lewis & the Playboys. For a time in the late '60s, he was also a member of the band Colours, which cut two LPs for Dot Records at the end of the decade.
 
All Things Must Pass
It was Russell's introduction that brought Radle to the attention ofDelaney & Bonnie and led to him joining their backing band (alongside drummer Jim Gordon) and which, in turn, led him to cross paths withEric Clapton, who used him (along with Gordon) on his first solo album, and also to his participation in the sessions for George Harrison's All Things Must Pass album, which brought about the formation of Derek & the Dominos. Though it took a little time to be fully appreciated by the public, the resulting album, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, proved to be one of the most enduring creations to come out of Clapton's career. Radle later played with Joe Cocker's Mad Dogs & Englishmen show and on the resulting album, again with Russell's prompting, and on albums byDave MasonMark BennoJ.J. CaleRita CoolidgeDr. JohnArt GarfunkelBuddy GuyBobby Keys, and Freddie King, and as a member of Leon Russell & the Shelter People. By 1975, when Claptonresumed touring, he brought Radle back as a bandmember and he remained through the Backless album — then, in 1978, Clapton decided to dismiss his group, believing it to be inadequate in the studio.
 
At the outset of the 1970s, Radle had cut an extraordinary musical figure, his tall, slightly gaunt bespectacled figure hunched over his instrument holding down the rhythm section with whatever drummer he happened to be working with, whether he was playing blues, country, or rock & roll. And the results were impressive, a fact born out by the sheer number of sessions he'd played in the first half of the 1970s. By the second half of the decade, however, Radle's health had started to decline, principally from the ravages of excessive drinking and some drug use. He died in 1980, of complications from a kidney infection caused by his alcoholism and addiction. At the time, his passing was barely noticed even by many Clapton fans or the rock press.
toterola
(Further)
Posted: Jun 17, 2012 21:49
 

 johnjconn wrote:

Funny thing is, I too feel somewhat the same way.  EC is good, but way over rated. I'm not at a "can't stand this guy" level.

With that said, this song is great. 
 
Eric Clapton is over-rated? Compared to who? Gandhi? MLK? Abraham Lincoln?

Christ, the guy has been championing the blues for nearly 50 years, and giving props to everyone from Robert Johnson to Buddy Guy along the way.

John Mayer is over-rated. Eric Clapton is the gold standard.

To each his own, but damn! {#Rolleyes}
Antigone
(A house, in a Virginian Valley)
Posted: Apr 15, 2012 9:06
 

I hope this great song makes it rain here soon!  {#Umbrella}
martinc
(Ottawa Canada)
Posted: Apr 15, 2012 9:06
 

I remember jamming with this bass player many moons ago. This was the one song he kept on trying to get me to play but I had never heard it. All he had was this bass line and I really like it but just couldn't fill it in
sirdroseph
(Yes)
Posted: Mar 14, 2012 17:34
 

I always forget about this song believe it or not. Definitely a winner for Mr. Clapton.
Cynaera
(In a hammock under my own vine and fig tree.)
Posted: Nov 08, 2011 16:24
 

I still love this song. Wish I still had the album, but I'll take my chances with RP.
LowPhreak
(United Corporate States of Neo-Feudal Amurika, Inc.)
Posted: Nov 08, 2011 16:24
 

One of EC's very best.
johnjconn
(chicago land)
Posted: Sep 06, 2011 18:02
 

 tutakea wrote:
surprise, surprise!
normally, you will see me on emergency escape as soon as a eric-clapton-song will appear anywhere, i really can´t stand this guy.
this song, however, is really really good.
i was about to swear it´s a up-to-now-undiscovered song by my favourite band "big star" lol
thanx anyway for this one :-)
 
Funny thing is, I too feel somewhat the same way.  EC is good, but way over rated. I'm not at a "can't stand this guy" level.

With that said, this song is great. 


tutakea
Posted: Aug 06, 2011 8:38
 

surprise, surprise!
normally, you will see me on emergency escape as soon as a eric-clapton-song will appear anywhere, i really can´t stand this guy.
this song, however, is really really good.
i was about to swear it´s a up-to-now-undiscovered song by my favourite band "big star" lol
thanx anyway for this one :-)
RobRyan
(Canyon Country, CA)
Posted: May 03, 2011 18:20
 

 copymonkey wrote:

And if I have my timeline correct—he was pretty much baked this whole year (and for several subsequent years). Even if he was partaking in the kinds of pharmacueticals that keep you awake for days, still pretty impressive to be abvle to function, let alone play and sing
 
Heck, these helped him tremendously. His music is much less compelling since.
WonderLizard
(2,755.46 mi. due east of Paradise)
Posted: Mar 01, 2011 15:33
 

For the longest time Clapton refused to sing. I think it was Leon Russell who convinced him—sorta, "If I can do it, you can." This vocal is gorgeous.
unclehud
(300 feet above the planet)
Posted: Mar 01, 2011 15:32
 

Sometimes your soul desires something simple, familiar, and worn-in.  Like this tune.  Thanks!
triskele
(too close to the edge)
Posted: Aug 26, 2010 17:13
 

thank you.
Cynaera
(South of Neanderthal)
Posted: Jul 25, 2010 17:01
 

I'd heard "Layla."  And then I somehow ended up with an album with this song, and I just never explored anything else. I listened to this song over and over until the grooves were white. (To those young-uns who've never experienced vinyl, do your homework. Vinyl was the first and foremost avenue for providing music to the masses, apart from radio.)

So - somewhere in my collection of albums, I have this one. With one track ruined from gleeful over-play. {#Daisy}
calypsus_1
Posted: May 13, 2010 0:51
 


Eric Clapton - "Wonderfull Tonight" Live

wonderfull tonight - eric clapton.

"Listen, having a great deal more experience than you as a college student, i have some good advice for you.. dont hate any genre of music, there's stuff to appreciate in all of em. you dont hv to like it, but hate is a strong word."          vic3vn


LowPhreak
(United Corporate States of Neo-Feudal Amurika, Inc.)
Posted: Apr 21, 2010 6:23
 

w00t!  {#Group-hug}
lmic
(Harmless Little Bunny)
Posted: Mar 20, 2010 16:13
 

{#Sunny}{#Umbrella} {#Kiss}{#Umbrella}{#Sunny}
l e t  i t  r a i n!

westslope
(BC coast)
Posted: Jan 16, 2010 16:04
 

 EssexTex wrote:

Yeah...what is it with fish and rock anyway?....apart from rockfish that is

 

And psychedelic drugs?  -lol-

 

Man alive, this sounds sweet!


copymonkey
(in the northeast, but not near anywhere cool)
Posted: Dec 16, 2009 6:10
 

 toterola wrote:
It's hard to believe that one man has been personally involved in so much incredible music-making, and for so many years.

This album came out the same year as Derek and the Dominoes "Layla" and the Delaney and Bonnie album!

Either one far exceeds what most artists can even aspire to, much less equal and excel. Clapton is truly unbelievable! {#Clap}
 
And if I have my timeline correct—he was pretty much baked this whole year (and for several subsequent years). Even if he was partaking in the kinds of pharmacueticals that keep you awake for days, still pretty impressive to be abvle to function, let alone play and sing

EssexTex
(Gitche Gumee)
Posted: Oct 14, 2009 9:17
 

westslope wrote:
BTW, did you folks know that Eric is a keen trout flyfisher (as are several members of the British rock fraternity)?

Yeah...what is it with fish and rock anyway?....apart from rockfish that is