[ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Log in above to post your comment
maboleth
Posted: Mar 22, 2018 5:17
 

 jelgator wrote:
Well, I guess Creep was a good song.

 
Yeah and was more or less spot on describing the author.
jelgator
Posted: Nov 27, 2017 10:31
 

Well, I guess Creep was a good song.
Cueburned
(Prince Edward Island, Canada)
Posted: Jun 07, 2017 7:00
 

Ack.  Next time do the opioids AFTER you track the vocals...or whatever that is.   
Skydog
Posted: Apr 27, 2017 19:14
 

 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Skydog...  Radiohead has a good drummer and could have played on this instead but I imagine this song is a 'concept' where the drum loops were deliberately chosen to give a happy, skip-a-long beat.  Everything is going along aimlessly in a background sort of way then just when you are beginning to get bored with the repetition they start to overlay the other guitar and singing loops which get ever discordant and foreboding.  Clouds start to form on the horizon of Paradise...

It reminds me of a mixture of Sci-Fi movies where the future inhabitants live in a clean, sterile and highly organised and controlled world. Elevator type Muzak plays over hidden public address systems and people live and work in a trance-like state.  Then something happens... say like a fault in the air-conditioning caused by a meteorite and things start to go wrong bit by bit.  The air-con stops workiing, the music stops, the 'sky' projection starts to malfunction and their whole artificial world slowly begins to disintegrate.

That sort of thing.

Have I embellished it enough to make you change your mind?
 
cool Dude, I know and love Radiohead, their rhythm section is one of my all time favorites,
and their layered production earns them the title of the 21st Century Beatles,
...if only they wouldn't have mixed the drum loop so up front,
that high hat after a few hundred times just kills it for me
 
Stephen_Phillips
(Hillsborough, Northern Ireland)
Posted: Mar 28, 2017 6:39
 

 Skydog wrote:
I love Radiohead but (you knew a but was coming) I quickly got tired of the drum loops on this album, 
just to obvious and quickly tiresome,
.
but (yep here's another one) on my bucket list before I die is to see them live 
they are going to do some shows in 2017 

 
Skydog...  Radiohead has a good drummer and could have played on this instead but I imagine this song is a 'concept' where the drum loops were deliberately chosen to give a happy, skip-a-long beat.  Everything is going along aimlessly in a background sort of way then just when you are beginning to get bored with the repetition they start to overlay the other guitar and singing loops which get ever discordant and foreboding.  Clouds start to form on the horizon of Paradise...

It reminds me of a mixture of Sci-Fi movies where the future inhabitants live in a clean, sterile and highly organised and controlled world. Elevator type Muzak plays over hidden public address systems and people live and work in a trance-like state.  Then something happens... say like a fault in the air-conditioning caused by a meteorite and things start to go wrong bit by bit.  The air-con stops workiing, the music stops, the 'sky' projection starts to malfunction and their whole artificial world slowly begins to disintegrate.

That sort of thing.

Have I embellished it enough to make you change your mind?

LizK
(West Florida, where the gators roam)
Posted: Mar 07, 2017 15:26
 

 kingart wrote:
The art bears some resemblance to Abbott and Costello — the two so-named aliens in the new movie Arrival. Or, perhaps, since RH's music preceded, it's more correct to say that these movie ETs resemble the album cover. 
The movie is quite terrific. Evocative, thoughtful, poetic, but enigmatic, with big ideas about non-linear time and language as a far deeper form of communication than humans give it.  I look at this cover and see Abbott and Costello. 
I suppose that exploring language and meaning may be some of what RH's music is about, but thus far and probably forever I am much more inclined to psd and because to me most of its riches are m.i.a. 

 
Love a sy-fi movie with big ideas. I will see if Netflix offers "Arrival".  Meanwhile, (I can't resist this)   Who's on first?
kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Nov 25, 2016 12:11
 

The art bears some resemblance to Abbott and Costello — the two so-named aliens in the new movie Arrival. Or, perhaps, since RH's music preceded, it's more correct to say that these movie ETs resemble the album cover. 
The movie is quite terrific. Evocative, thoughtful, poetic, but enigmatic, with big ideas about non-linear time and language as a far deeper form of communication than humans give it.  I look at this cover and see Abbott and Costello. 
I suppose that exploring language and meaning may be some of what RH's music is about, but thus far and probably forever I am much more inclined to psd and because to me most of its riches are m.i.a. 
Skydog
Posted: Oct 25, 2016 15:07
 

I love Radiohead but (you knew a but was coming) I quickly got tired of the drum loops on this album, 
just to obvious and quickly tiresome,
.
but (yep here's another one) on my bucket list before I die is to see them live 
they are going to do some shows in 2017 
TianGongZhong
(Quite close to the sun)
Posted: Aug 02, 2016 16:21
 

Thom York ripped off Helge Schneider !

Seine grössten Erfolge
Boy_Wonder
(Bath, back in the UK)
Posted: Apr 18, 2016 6:25
 

 crogers wrote:
Sometimes I think if I hear or read the term "noodling" to describe a musician's choice of technique again, I'll be unable to keep myself from slapping someone hard in the face.  

It's music.  It's art.  It is an expression of the heart of the artist.  Using a word like "noodling" to describe the way in which an artist chooses to use his/her instrument to portray an emotion, I think, is childish and shows a deep and inexcusable ignorance of what music is.  I suppose that those who have seen too few winters could be excused, being weaned on the top-40 pop-pablum that tries to pass as music today.  But those of us who came up through some of the most enlightened, free and inspired years of music creation that this planet has ever known deserve no quarter for pigeon-holing any kind of musical expression that is outside the mainstream as "noodling".  

For the love of Everything that is Musical and Magical, take off the blinders, get out of your tiny box and get over your narrow-minded little self.  If your entire musical world is nothing but 4/4 time, nursery rhymes and Glen Campbellesque vocal stylings, you are missing out on a universe of human expression that deserves more than a ridiculous critique using grade school verbiage and a painfully obvious lack of appreciation for what it takes to make good music happen.  Go ahead — write a song.  Then perform it.  Then record it.  Then mix it.  Then submit it to RP.  Come on... I dare you.  Let's see what you can do, noodlehead!  Jeez.

A thousand apologies for the diatribe — but man, that shit just pisses me off. 

 

One man;s meat is another man's noodle!!

Not to my taste, so I'm off to feast over at PSD, but respect to anyone who stays here for the afternoon helping of gruel  {#Chef} 
zivko
(toronto canada)
Posted: Feb 25, 2016 5:31
 

 Reckoner978 wrote:

It was 'bout time someone said something on that matter, and I think no one could have done it better. Well done sir, you've got a beer from me! {#Clap} 

 
Well said
 
zivko
(toronto canada)
Posted: Feb 25, 2016 5:30
 

 Reckoner978 wrote:

It was 'bout time someone said something on that matter, and I think no one could have done it better. Well done sir, you've got a beer from me! {#Clap} 

 
I second that thought
 
maboleth
Posted: Feb 25, 2016 5:20
 

Oh no! Someone please give Thom something to eat and regain some strength so he could stop moaning! :)
kcar
Posted: Dec 13, 2015 21:43
 

 MassivRuss wrote:

Uhhh. I only said that horrid voice is the worst aspect of RH's stuff. The compositions typically have a great hook for 5-20 seconds, after which deeper exploration of that idea is abandoned to aimless noodling, minimalism for its own sake.

There are songs *about* suicide and depression, but RH makes me *feel* depressed and suicidal.

But for Hipsters, it's "complex" and "spiritual" and "you just don't get it..." I don't, I have really tried.

 
I'm with you on this tonight. Actually had this rated a 7 sometime in the past. Radiohead doesn't get me depressed when I'm not into the band—the songs just grate. 

Sorry, crogers, tonight this is just noodling. I wish Radiohead would rely more on their supposedly expert musicianship than leaning on Thom to warble me towards some mood. 
Reckoner978
(Serbia)
Posted: Dec 11, 2015 5:27
 

 crogers wrote:
Sometimes I think if I hear or read the term "noodling" to describe a musician's choice of technique again, I'll be unable to keep myself from slapping someone hard in the face.  

It's music.  It's art.  It is an expression of the heart of the artist.  Using a word like "noodling" to describe the way in which an artist chooses to use his/her instrument to portray an emotion, I think, is childish and shows a deep and inexcusable ignorance of what music is.  I suppose that those who have seen too few winters could be excused, being weaned on the top-40 pop-pablum that tries to pass as music today.  But those of us who came up through some of the most enlightened, free and inspired years of music creation that this planet has ever known deserve no quarter for pigeon-holing any kind of musical expression that is outside the mainstream as "noodling".  

For the love of Everything that is Musical and Magical, take off the blinders, get out of your tiny box and get over your narrow-minded little self.  If your entire musical world is nothing but 4/4 time, nursery rhymes and Glen Campbellesque vocal stylings, you are missing out on a universe of human expression that deserves more than a ridiculous critique using grade school verbiage and a painfully obvious lack of appreciation for what it takes to make good music happen.  Go ahead — write a song.  Then perform it.  Then record it.  Then mix it.  Then submit it to RP.  Come on... I dare you.  Let's see what you can do, noodlehead!  Jeez.

A thousand apologies for the diatribe — but man, that shit just pisses me off. 

 
It was 'bout time someone said something on that matter, and I think no one could have done it better. Well done sir, you've got a beer from me! {#Clap} 
1wolfy
(Mission Viejo California)
Posted: Nov 12, 2015 14:17
 

Anathema,  The Lost Song part 3 comes to mind when hearing this..I prefer the former to the latter.
Stephen_Phillips
(Hillsborough, Northern Ireland)
Posted: Sep 08, 2015 6:58
 

I like the way this song starts off as a rather offbeat and slightly disjointed song going nowhere in particular then the loops start to overlay  rather menacing and sinister overtones.  Definitely strange and requires close listening to the evolving rhythms.
crogers
(Sunny California)
Posted: Aug 15, 2015 19:27
 

Sometimes I think if I hear or read the term "noodling" to describe a musician's choice of technique again, I'll be unable to keep myself from slapping someone hard in the face.  

It's music.  It's art.  It is an expression of the heart of the artist.  Using a word like "noodling" to describe the way in which an artist chooses to use his/her instrument to portray an emotion, I think, is childish and shows a deep and inexcusable ignorance of what music is.  I suppose that those who have seen too few winters could be excused, being weaned on the top-40 pop-pablum that tries to pass as music today.  But those of us who came up through some of the most enlightened, free and inspired years of music creation that this planet has ever known deserve no quarter for pigeon-holing any kind of musical expression that is outside the mainstream as "noodling".  

For the love of Everything that is Musical and Magical, take off the blinders, get out of your tiny box and get over your narrow-minded little self.  If your entire musical world is nothing but 4/4 time, nursery rhymes and Glen Campbellesque vocal stylings, you are missing out on a universe of human expression that deserves more than a ridiculous critique using grade school verbiage and a painfully obvious lack of appreciation for what it takes to make good music happen.  Go ahead — write a song.  Then perform it.  Then record it.  Then mix it.  Then submit it to RP.  Come on... I dare you.  Let's see what you can do, noodlehead!  Jeez.

A thousand apologies for the diatribe — but man, that shit just pisses me off. 
Tana
(Lancaster, PA)
Posted: Jul 20, 2015 13:23
 

 westslope wrote:

Yup.  That captures a lot of Radio Head.

 
I feel a lot of tension building up, not noodling. It's all going somewhere and gets more complex along the way.
westslope
(BC sage brush steppe)
Posted: May 13, 2015 14:39
 

 MassivRuss wrote:

.... The compositions typically have a great hook for 5-20 seconds, after which deeper exploration of that idea is abandoned to aimless noodling, minimalism for its own sake.

.....
 
Yup.  That captures a lot of Radio Head.