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WonderLizard
(2,755.46 mi. due east of Paradise)
Posted: Jun 05, 2018 19:17
 

What I love is the British railway station masquerading as something vaguely western American, possibly a train station. Regardless of whatever drove John and Taupin, the album is a masterpiece, perhaps an apotheosis of their work.
Sasha2001
(North Carolina, where the quality of our)
Posted: Mar 12, 2018 9:16
 

 MediaGrrl wrote:
The Sting cover of this from "Two Rooms" is lovely - I think I prefer it.

Blasphemy, I know.

 
Sure, the original has some dated orchestration and the Sting version is a lot cleaner but come on, we just don't hear enough bassoon in rock music anymore!
Sasha2001
(North Carolina, where the quality of our)
Posted: Mar 12, 2018 9:12
 

Masterpiece is a word I don't like to throw around very often so I won't use it to describe this song. ...but it is a fantastic creation nonetheless.
MediaGrrl
(Yank in Denmark)
Posted: Mar 12, 2018 9:11
 

The Sting cover of this from "Two Rooms" is lovely - I think I prefer it.

Blasphemy, I know.
cc_rider
(Bastrop)
Posted: Jan 08, 2018 11:42
 

 SanFranGayMan wrote:
This album and his Elton John album represent what an inflective time that was, with the Viet Nam war swirling around, the inflection psychedelics and weed provided-the conflict of so much family who thought of themselves as patriots and us as less thans. These albums for me were shelters from the storm, a chance to get grounded and reassured when we were facing headwinds much larger than we were. And all the more remarkable that he and Bernie wrote about an environment-the South-without being there. Simply, quite stunning. Our poets...

 

Bernie Taupin was obsessed with the American South, particularly the Civil War. 'My Father's Gun' is a great example. Not to mention obsessions with death and dying, as in 'Where To Now St. Peter?'

The other recurring theme from their collaboration seems to be autobiographical: the City Boy and the Country Boy. Captain Fantastic, GYBR, Honky Cat, etc.

TC holds up as an incredible piece of work. I put it on about once a month.

Another very underrated album was 'Blue Moves'. Not in the same league as this, but surprisingly good.
c.
expatlar
Posted: Nov 16, 2017 15:41
 

In the early seventies at my house we used to call this 'The Brown Album' as opposed to 'Madman Across the Water' which was 'The Blue Album'. "Which one you wanna' hear, the brown or the blue album?"
folkrocker
(Tulsa, OK)
Posted: Jul 17, 2017 13:34
 

 NorthernLad wrote:
The art direction of the original vinyl is the best I have ever seen.  The gate-fold sleeve, the photos, the big booklet of lyrics, soaked in the old west of America. 

Elton and Bernie's best album, full stop.

Image result for tumbleweed connection vinyl record

 
I'll second that!
nomnol
(Grafton ON)
Posted: Jul 17, 2017 11:18
 

 jbarryc wrote:
An extraordinary song from his greatest record-IMO

 
Ditto. {#Clap}
pinto
(west meade)
Posted: Jun 10, 2017 5:07
 

 Stephen_Phillips wrote:
I haven't liked Elton John or his music for a very long time but this song and the album reminds me why I once liked him in the early 70's. Tumbleweed Connection was and still is excellent.

 
I'll second and third that.
GeorgeMWoods
Posted: May 10, 2017 18:20
 

Time has not been kind to this song. 
jbarryc
(New York City)
Posted: Mar 17, 2017 7:43
 

Elton and Bernie at their best
NorthernLad
(Sendai, Japan)
Posted: Mar 10, 2017 14:44
 

The art direction of the original vinyl is the best I have ever seen.  The gate-fold sleeve, the photos, the big booklet of lyrics, soaked in the old west of America. 

Elton and Bernie's best album, full stop.

Image result for tumbleweed connection vinyl record
beinder
(Lotusland)
Posted: Mar 10, 2017 14:39
 

Elton spotted in Vancouver, BC, Canada yesterday updating his vinyl collection.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/elton-john-beat-street-records-1.4018502
SanFranGayMan
(San Francisco)
Posted: Feb 07, 2017 21:32
 

This album and his Elton John album represent what an inflective time that was, with the Viet Nam war swirling around, the inflection psychedelics and weed provided-the conflict of so much family who thought of themselves as patriots and us as less thans. These albums for me were shelters from the storm, a chance to get grounded and reassured when we were facing headwinds much larger than we were. And all the more remarkable that he and Bernie wrote about an environment-the South-without being there. Simply, quite stunning. Our poets...
kaybee
(Lost in the Wilds of Toronto)
Posted: Dec 08, 2016 18:15
 

This is a lovely piece - one of Elton John's best. I didn't realize til now that  it has an oboe in it.  This album and his Madman Across the Water were his zenith.



stegokitty
(tree)
Posted: Nov 14, 2016 14:43
 

 Dahlia_Gumbo wrote:
Didn't think I liked EJ, but I do like this. Life is full of surprises — where've I been?
 
Early Elton John is fabulous stuff.
Dahlia_Gumbo
(San Francisco)
Posted: Nov 07, 2016 21:22
 

Didn't think I liked EJ, but I do like this. Life is full of surprises -- where've I been?
twoplain2sea
(After the gold rush by my friend Amphion.)
Posted: Aug 05, 2016 18:06
 

Had why ear and thumbs up
grahamdillabough
(Somewhere in Kuwait)
Posted: May 02, 2016 1:21
 

I think this is his best album, and my favourite.  Not a bad track on it.

I believe I read somewhere that he considers it his favourite.  (could be wrong, though) 
Stephen_Phillips
(Hillsborough, Northern Ireland)
Posted: Mar 31, 2016 2:36
 

I haven't liked Elton John or his music for a very long time but this song and the album reminds me why I once liked him in the early 70's. Tumbleweed Connection was and still is excellent.