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FrankDebbieCote
(west suburbs of Chicagoland)
Posted: Jun 25, 2018 9:04
 

BoFiS
(Brooklyn, NY)
Posted: Dec 04, 2017 20:02
 

 Proclivities wrote:

Billy West wasn't the original voice actor for Popeye - that was primarily Jack Mercer in the 1930s.  But West, who voiced-over the 2004, CGI Popeye film, did say he got the idea after watching a film about Paul Pena (who wrote "Jet Airliner"), who had heard Tuvan throat singing on a shortwave radio and became interested in it.

 
I think he might have meant the actual original voice done by William Costello, as once he was dismissed, Jack Mercer took over after learning how to imitate how William Costello had done the voice.
scottc
(Shores of the big river)
Posted: Nov 07, 2017 9:52
 

When friends are over and I'm playing my (google music) playlist of songs I created based on introduction from RP:  when Mathais' "Sombarai"comes on....I'd say I get more comments than on almost any other song.  Positive feedback.

Thanks Bill and Rebecca.
Proclivities
(Paris of the Piedmont)
Posted: Nov 02, 2017 12:06
 

 Mackmoney3000 wrote:
The original voice actor for "Popeye" got the inspiration for Popeye's voice by hearing Tuvan throat singing on a shortwave radio. Makes sense!
 
Billy West wasn't the original voice actor for Popeye - that was primarily Jack Mercer in the 1930s.  But West, who voiced-over the 2004, CGI Popeye film, did say he got the idea after watching a film about Paul Pena (who wrote "Jet Airliner"), who had heard Tuvan throat singing on a shortwave radio and became interested in it.
Hey_Porter
Posted: Nov 02, 2017 12:00
 

This sounds like Richard Thompson on acid
SquiddlyDiddly
(Brighton, UK)
Posted: Oct 05, 2017 7:26
 

I just love that this track has a 7.1 rating. 

Thanks fellow RP Peeps! 
KaiT
(Toronto Canada)
Posted: Sep 02, 2017 10:37
 

 Great reference to Gabriel here. Thanks Michael. 

Michael_Dean wrote:

Michael Dean wrote:  Now, wait just a minute....

Give this song a chance, Shake your hands, pull your fingers, stroke my hair, scratch your nose, hug your knees, fold your arms, breathe in deeply, cross my legs, Shrug your shoulders, stretch your back,

Then!  Go ahead and do your best to sing along with Mathias, (I do).  I think you'll find we've got something more than 'a vote for diversity' going on here. 

Thanks Bill, for introducing me to this sound.  Duplessy has integrated Mongolian throat singing, with the blues and he threw in the kitchen sink, it's just awesome.  I thought Harry Manx was all alone out there, glad to see he's got some company now.  If we can just find someone who has studied and jammed with inter-dimensional aliens for 7 years, we might surpass these guys. 

Bill, you know what we're looking for now, right.

 

KaiT
(Toronto Canada)
Posted: Sep 02, 2017 10:35
 

This was just amazing. As a vocalist I can completely understand the effort and mastery of technique it takes to produce this kind of vocalization. To apply it so effortlessly with conventional singing and composition of a pleasing nature..... genius. Incredible. 
 
Mackmoney3000
(New Jersey)
Posted: Aug 23, 2017 6:38
 

The original voice actor for "Popeye" got the inspiration for Popeye's voice by hearing Tuvan throat singing on a shortwave radio. Makes sense!
thewiseking
(New York, New York)
Posted: Jun 07, 2017 14:11
 

That is not a beautiful voice. Methinks Mathias needs to cough up a lung
Twacorby
(Limoges- France)
Posted: May 03, 2017 2:33
 

Un Français multi-instrumentiste qui fait de la musique du monde. C'est extra et très bon à l'écoute ! :)
bam23
(Berkeley)
Posted: Apr 04, 2017 21:18
 


Sam_Chucklestone wrote:
 
What a great sound. The composition of the song is beautifully crafted too, like riding across the steppe, daydreaming. Bill and Rebecca really are musicologists par excellence.

betty_turtledove wrote:
YES, this counts as singing. I knew and performed with Kongar-Ool Ondar, one of the most famous Tuvan throat singers in the world, who sadly died a few months later. It's amazing to watch and hear. It's a finely-honed art form requiring years of study. He was a wonderful guy and a very nice man. Ondar could simultaneously produce three tones at once: The low, chesty growl, the what-I-think-of-as the handsome man middle voice, and the birdlike whistling over the top of the others. The last time I saw him, he had a dreadful flu, but he soldiered on and completed our show (I am with Zhena Folk Chorus). He then left for a several-city tour after the show.

Just because it's not Pat Boone or Justin Bieber, it doesn't mean it's not singing. There's a fascinating film on part of his life called Genghis Blues, detailing a trip back to his home several years ago. There is a lot of throat singing in it. Once you become acquainted with it and with him, you might find yourself enjoying it. I did.

 

This is also why I love RP, where else would you find someone like Betty who could give such a thoughtful and informative comment on Tuvan throat singing?!!! From personal experience too. Bravo Betty.

BTW, many of the Hunmen (Huns)  were in western Europe both before and after their military campaigns, working as cavalry for various polities. They were mainly Turkic and originated near the region of modern Tuva, also Turkic, having similar pastoral lifestyles and religion. No doubt some Tuvans were with them.

They integrated well, marrying local girls, and left a significant legacy. In Britain, many place names have the "Hun" component in them. Hunmanby, in the north east of England being the most obvious. Tuva was part of the Mongol Empire that swept across Europe again in later times, and again, some of the Golden Horde remained.

The peoples from around the Tuvan region have also been genetically linked to the Native American/First Nations too, thus originally populating the Americas.

So, if you claim any British descent (or European, or ... etc.) there is a good chance you have a drop of Central Asian blood in you from way back. We're all Eurasians you see (AfroEurAsians to honour our African roots and be accurate, i.e. Humans.), look at the map. This is why some rich psychopaths are stirring up all the trouble. Eurasia at peace by fair treaties will be good for humanity. Check out the "New Silk Road". A rail link echoing the original migrations across the Bering Strait is also proposed, joining the trade corridors of the Old World with the New.

All you English-speaking haters, please take note, we are all family. This could be the voice of your ancestors.

And it's waaay cool! ! !

Sorry, I got carried away a bit there. {(:-{o>

 
Getting carried away is what makes (most) everything worthwhile. All knowledge is in some sense specialized and this post adds to our collective understanding of who we are and how we got here. Even if regurgitating info from other sources. Also, an interesting Europeanized piece of music. We diverged before and during the Pleistocene and are re-merging.
dplant
(Canada)
Posted: Apr 02, 2017 13:59
 

That was great... It added a little more experience to my day, Thanks Bill. 
ubuntourist
(Brain-Washington)
Posted: Apr 02, 2017 13:54
 

I'm listening to this for the first time, and intrigued. Odd — well, not for RP — and quite likable. (My monolingual ears and brain wanted to force the lyrics into something more familiar, but the best I could do was to think of it as a weird form of "Hava Nagila". Plus throat singing. Plus didgeridoo. Or something.)

Then, I was enlightened by the comment from Betty.
TomSweetwater
Posted: Feb 20, 2017 18:57
 

 TomSweetwater wrote:
Not understanding the words just adds to the power of instruments especially the vocalist.

Inspiring.

 
I think my Radio Paradise app posts with a stutter.
TomSweetwater
Posted: Feb 20, 2017 18:56
 

Not understanding the words just adds to the power of instruments especially the vocalist.

Inspiring.
TomSweetwater
Posted: Feb 20, 2017 18:49
 

Not understanding the words just adds to the power of instruments especially the vocalist.

Inspiring. 
impediguy
Posted: Nov 30, 2016 19:56
 

Was this the guy who was inaugurated by Bela Fleck?
uhuru
(Genova, Italy)
Posted: Nov 22, 2016 7:52
 

I love RP also for these not english tunes. But I miss Ethiopian music, please broadcast more Ethio music!
jimtyrrell
(Owings, MD 20736)
Posted: Nov 20, 2016 17:06
 

one of the reasons I love RP are the great tunes from outside the English World. 7.9