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oldfart48
(B.C.)
Posted: Sep 30, 2013 - 00:04
 

FOGERTY ROCKS ,  CCR RULES...... " got it "........{#Good-vibes}...{#Dancingbanana}

unclehud
(now 50 feet above the planet in Boston)
Posted: May 26, 2013 - 18:49
 

Honorary Southerners.  They play dixie rock as well as anyone.  Notice the tight vocal harmonies and gospel influence?

gvan
(From inside the house!)
Posted: Feb 21, 2013 - 12:23
 

 JIan wrote:

I too get this mental image when listening to this tune now.  
 
Yep, Twilight Zone for me too. Also it's cool that this is one of those songs that synch up with the dancin' banana! {#Dancingbanana}

JIan
(Phoenix, AZ, USA)
Posted: Feb 21, 2013 - 12:21
 

 kurtster wrote:

Although been listening to this since it was new, the visual images I associate with this song are from the scene in the ambulance in Twightlight Zone, the Movie.
 
I too get this mental image when listening to this tune now.  

BibKiller
(seattle)
Posted: Nov 19, 2012 - 11:30
 

this is the stuff!!!!!

dew34
(Wisconsin-quite woodsy)
Posted: Sep 17, 2012 - 13:33
 

 LizK wrote:
Ahhhhh, this song rocks!
 
YESH!!!!!!!!

kingart
(Brooklyn NY)
Posted: Jul 16, 2012 - 15:21
 

CCR was one of the most solid American bands. No debate. Hit after hit after hit of really sing-along songs — even if sometimes, like Travelin Band or Sweet Hitchhiker, one would need to find the lyrics to decode what the hell language Fogerty was singing in! 

Toke
(Bournemouth UK)
Posted: May 14, 2012 - 05:54
 

Oooooohhhhhhh  those days of the 'Skiffle' group .. washboard,teachest bass, guitar and gazoo .. them were the days  {#Dancingbanana}

Bozo
(Steeler Penguin Pirate land)
Posted: Apr 12, 2012 - 12:36
 

This is the worst song on a great album!!!

Desimia
(Buenvenidos a Me-ah-mi)
Posted: Apr 12, 2012 - 12:33
 

Twilight Zone - the movie?
 


kurtster
(Back in Ohiya, for now ...)
Posted: Apr 01, 2012 - 20:45
 

 coffee-eyes wrote:
Will forever make me think of the old tv show Midnight Special.
 
Although been listening to this since it was new, the visual images I associate with this song are from the scene in the ambulance in Twightlight Zone, the Movie.

LizK
(Houston, Texas)
Posted: Mar 11, 2012 - 21:20
 

Ahhhhh, this song rocks!

martinc
(Ottawa Canada)
Posted: Jan 08, 2012 - 08:03
 

I under appreciated his guitar playing until I bought his solo live album. This boy knows his way around the fret board.

unclehud
(300 feet above the planet)
Posted: Dec 07, 2011 - 12:46
 

O. M. G.  Flashback City!

For what it's worth, I had a submarine buddy from Lancaster, CA, who sounded WAY more hick than I do — and I grew up in SC and GA.  Perhaps it's more about rural (or boondocks) rather than north/south/east/west.


Proclivities
(Carrboro, NC)
Posted: Oct 05, 2011 - 08:16
 

 WonderLizard wrote:

Thanks for posting this. Fogerty, besides being a rock'n'roll badass, is sometimes portrayed as a poseur—mostly because of all those southern affectations. He and the rest of CCR were born and bred in the Bay Area (Emeryville). I don't think Fogerty gets enough credit for his amazing sense of American musical idioms. "Midnight Special" is but one example. After all, Clapton, Richards, and Mayall did the same thing, and we lionize them—and they're British!

 
I guess some people did criticize these guys because they were not "authentic" southern/bayou or whatever, but overall, I think most listeners didn't mind, just as with those English fellows you mentioned.  Besides, was there a traditional or regional  "Northern California sound" that Fogerty could have employed instead?


Baketown
(Maryland)
Posted: Oct 05, 2011 - 08:00
 

 vicariance wrote:
Just not a creedence fan and never will be.  His voice is so scratchy. Always sounds like he's in pain.
 

Thats the point,  but I respect your opinion


DelaPesca
Posted: Oct 05, 2011 - 08:00
 

Chingona.

Snoopy2
(A Snoopy Lovin' House)
Posted: Aug 03, 2011 - 12:16
 

It's a nice song

WonderLizard
(2,755.46 mi. due east of Paradise)
Posted: Feb 26, 2011 - 19:45
 

 calypsus_1 wrote:

<snip>

"  "Midnight Special" is a traditional folk song thought to have originated among prisoners in the American South.<The title comes from the refrain which refers to the Midnight Special and its "ever-loving light" (sometimes "ever-living light").

Let the Midnight Special shine her light on me,
Let the Midnight Special shine her ever-loving light on me. (Traditional)

The song is historically performed in the country-blues style from the viewpoint of the prisoner. The song has been covered by many different artists.

<snip>
 
Thanks for posting this. Fogerty, besides being a rock'n'roll badass, is sometimes portrayed as a poseur—mostly because of all those southern affectations. He and the rest of CCR were born and bred in the Bay Area (Emeryville). I don't think Fogerty gets enough credit for his amazing sense of American musical idioms. "Midnight Special" is but one example. After all, Clapton, Richards, and Mayall did the same thing, and we lionize them—and they're British!


vicariance
(awesome like a billion hot dogs)
Posted: Jan 26, 2011 - 13:15
 

Just not a creedence fan and never will be.  His voice is so scratchy. Always sounds like he's in pain.

Lrobby99
(Wisconsin, USA)
Posted: Nov 24, 2010 - 11:47
 

Really enjoy this CCR.

Cynaera
(South of Neanderthal)
Posted: Oct 23, 2010 - 20:15
 

 gatorade wrote:
Not a fan of JF or CCR. 
 
Thank you for your vote. It's important! (I'm not being snarky here - it's good that you made your dislike known.) I like JF and CCR, in a blanket sort of way.  You like Aretha's "Think" and Joni Mitchell's "Hejira," so you're SO cool in my book. I love RP because of the variety of music we get to hear here.

I remember when I was still a teenager, and staying up for the Midnight Special (with Wolfman Jack and all manner of acts) was my guilty pleasure. I wish those days could come back, just like they were, and not like they'd be once the networks got their hooks into them. I love to live in the past, because the present is just so UGLY.



gatorade
(Ocean Park, WA)
Posted: Oct 23, 2010 - 19:41
 

Not a fan of JF or CCR. 

calypsus_1
Posted: Jun 14, 2010 - 16:23
 


Creedence Clearwater Revival by The Boy With The Blues
http://www.flickr.com/photos/guitarreos/

Un grupo clave en el desarrollo de la historia del rock.

Conocido por muchos como el mejor grupo de singles, Creedence sigue siendo hoy en día una de las bandas referente a nivel mundial para muchos jóvenes y grupos nuevos. Además, sus canciones se siguen pinchando en las radios como seguro de éxito.

Riffs de guitarra contundentes, voces con potencia, melodías hermosas y capaces de hacerte levantar del asiento... Lo dicho, fundamentales. América les debe muchísmo; ellos son América

Copyright All rights reserved

.
——————————————————————————————————————

"  "Midnight Special" is a traditional folk song thought to have originated among prisoners in the American South.<The title comes from the refrain which refers to the Midnight Special and its "ever-loving light" (sometimes "ever-living light").

Let the Midnight Special shine her light on me,
Let the Midnight Special shine her ever-loving light on me. (Traditional)

The song is historically performed in the country-blues style from the viewpoint of the prisoner. The song has been covered by many different artists.

Lyrics appearing in the song were first recorded in print by
Howard Odum in 1905

The song was first commercially recorded on the OKeh label in 1926 as "Pistol Pete's Midnight Special" by Dave "Pistol Pete" Cutrell (a member of
McGinty's Oklahoma Cow Boy Band).

Sam Collins recorded the song commercially in 1927 under the title "The Midnight Special Blues" for Gennett Records.  His version also follows the traditional style. His is the first to name the woman in the story, Little Nora, and he refers to the Midnight Special's "ever-living" light.

In 1934 Huddie William "Lead Belly" Ledbetter recorded a version of the song at Angola Prison for John and Alan Lomax, who mistakenly attributed it to him as the author. However, Ledbetter, instead, for his Angola session, appears to have inserted several stanzas relating to a 1923 Houston jailbreak into the traditional song. Ledbetter recorded at least three versions of the song, one with the Golden Gate Quartet, a slick gospel group (recorded for RCA at Victor Studio #2, New York City, June 15, 1940).

John and Alan Lomax, in their book, Best Loved American Folk Songs, told a credulous story identifying the Midnight Special as a train from Houston shining its light into a cell in the Sugar Land Prison. They also describe Ledbetter's version as "the Negro jailbird's ballad to match Hard Times Poor Boy. Like so many American folk songs, its hero is not a man but a train." The light of the train is seen as the light of salvation, the train which could take them away from the prison walls. It is highly reminiscent of the imagery of such gospel songs as Let the Light from your Lighthouse Shine on Me.
Carl Sandburg had a different view. He believed the subject of the song would rather be run over by a train than spend more time in jail.

The song, as popularized by Ledbetter, has many parallel lines to other prison songs. It is essentially the same song as "De Funiac Blues," sung and played by Burruss Johnson and recorded by John Lomax at the Raiford State Penitentiary in Florida on 2 June 1939. Many of the lines appear in prison work songs such as "Jumpin Judy," "Ain't That Berta," "Oh Berta" and "Yon' Comes de Sargent." These songs, including Ledbetter's "Midnight Special." are composite. They mix standard prison song verses indiscriminately. Many of these component pieces have become canonized in the blues idiom and appear in mutated forms regularly in blues lyrics.

Other versions by The Beatles, Burl Ives, Johnny Rivers, Big Joe Turner, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Mungo Jerry, Van Morrison, Odetta, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Little Richard, Leadbelly, Buckwheat Zydeco, Pete Seeger, Otis Rush, The Kingston Trio, The Spencer Davis Group, Lonnie Donegan, Eric Clapton, Harry Belafonte, Big Bill Broonzy, Ursa Major, Paul McCartney and ABBA, among others, have recorded the song.

Bob Dylan references a line from the song - "shine your light on me" - on the second track, Precious Angel, of his late 70s gospel album Slow Train Coming. " in Wikipedia



calypsus_1
Posted: May 01, 2010 - 18:42
 



C.C.R.

On_The_Beach
(Vancouver BC, Bud)
Posted: Mar 31, 2010 - 01:36
 

I love CCR but this tune is just OK.

burdell
(Atlanta, GA)
Posted: Feb 27, 2010 - 11:07
 

Thanks for playing CCR. I needed a bathroom break and with all the great music today I was afraid I wasn't going to get a good time to walk away from RP for a bit.

Ho hum indeed.



h8rhater
Posted: Feb 11, 2010 - 13:17
 

 nickhanks wrote:
And I was just thinking earlier this week that at least RP never played Clarence Clearwater Revival, a staple of bad rock stations.  I never bought their albums at the time.  Something about their music just makes me nauseous.  Perhaps I associate it with the smell of bar vomit in the day.  Sorry.
 
So you like the bar vomit in the evening then?  Something about pretentious bozos, who think they're clever, always seems to nauseate me.


gumbo73039
(Devon, England)
Posted: Nov 09, 2009 - 08:25
 

Still small spaces for the oldies, like it!

Mike_S
(London ON)
Posted: Oct 24, 2009 - 18:12
 

dude

cactus7709
Posted: Sep 23, 2009 - 04:26
 

{#Dancingbanana_2}

Netto
(Himki, Russia.)
Posted: Aug 22, 2009 - 16:26
 

 romeotuma wrote:


This song is so good for the ears...
 



Oh yes .. ;) + 100

Let the Midnight Special shine a light on me,

Let the Midnight Special shine a light on me,

Let the Midnight Special shine a light on me,

Let the Midnight Special shine a everlovin' light on me.


ronbellaz
Posted: Aug 22, 2009 - 16:25
 

this song is one of those 'you had to have been there ... '  — and of course, if you can remember anything, you weren't there ... and through that fog of memories comes back the tunes floating on a haze of blue smoke, rolling on the floor and reaching for another ... 

nickhanks
Posted: Aug 06, 2009 - 19:01
 

And I was just thinking earlier this week that at least RP never played Clarence Clearwater Revival, a staple of bad rock stations.  I never bought their albums at the time.  Something about their music just makes me nauseous.  Perhaps I associate it with the smell of bar vomit in the day.  Sorry.

thediceareloaded
(Berlin, Germany)
Posted: Jun 20, 2009 - 06:38
 

My Dad made me listen to this music when I was a kid, and I loved it. Got not enough CCR on my Computer, need to change that!
Love it! 

(former member)
(hotel in Las Vegas)
Posted: May 19, 2009 - 12:37
 



This song is so good for the ears...



Mandible
Posted: Mar 17, 2009 - 09:06
 

CCR CCR CCR CCR!!!!!!
{#Dancingbanana_2}



coffee-eyes
(Bawstin, Massa2shits)
Posted: Mar 01, 2009 - 13:13
 

Will forever make me think of the old tv show Midnight Special.

Mark7
(Fort Wayne, Indiana)
Posted: Dec 12, 2008 - 12:44
 

When I was a kid and watched the Andy Griffith Show, I thought it was Andy who wrote this song and everyone else was stealing it.{#Confused}

rdo
Posted: Dec 12, 2008 - 12:42
 

"wanna see something really scary?"

vtparadise
(the green mountains)
Posted: Oct 26, 2008 - 04:45
 

Always the sign of a good day when it begins with CCR...

Otomi
(The edge of civilization)
Posted: Oct 10, 2008 - 08:54
 

I haven't seen the films you guys are talking about. I'm transported back to 1981, to San Miguel de Allende, to the living room I had built for my wife, with a wool blanket on the floor and a rustic table with a record player on it for furniture. Klaas Bil, a Dutch art student, and his sidekick (they used to play the local bars) did a lively rendition of this tune, jumping up and down, thrashing their guitars and belting out the vocals. I went into DJ mode so the musicians could join the party. My guests were possessed by a dance frenzy that went on for hours. We donned masks, formed a circle and passed around a big green rubber snake. The snake landed on the floor in the middle of the circle and the women took turns stepping on it, to the horror of the men. Baby Layla, who was then about half a year old, slept through it all.

More_Cowbell
(North of Chicago, IL, USA)
Posted: Oct 10, 2008 - 08:44
 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08YxwTzPwBQ
This is what I think of^


copymonkey
(in the northeast, but not near anywhere cool)
Posted: Sep 24, 2008 - 13:04
 

 treatment_bound wrote:
every time I hear this, I can't help but think of the egg-eating scene in Cool Hand Luke ...

 

Every time I hear it I think of the hilarious—and then scary opening scene of "The Twilight Zone" movie with Dan Ackroyd and Albert Brooks.
anyone?

thewiseking
(New York, New York)
Posted: Jul 23, 2008 - 07:45
 

nice cover
long live Huddie Ledbetter!
old_shep
(Iowa)
Posted: Jul 07, 2008 - 13:26
 

Love Credence...then and now..
Ericac
(Lakeville, MN)
Posted: Jul 07, 2008 - 13:25
 

Love the early CCR and especially this little ditty!
cc_rider
(Austin Texas. Y'all.)
Posted: May 05, 2008 - 14:36
 

preachersson wrote:
Great version, but nothing can beat Leadbelly.
Yeppers. This is a truly great cover, but Mr. Fogerty simply cannot imbue it with the passion and desperation Mr. Ledbetter gave it. FYI it was written while Leadbelly was incarcerated in Sugarland Texas, west of Houston. Billy Gibbons is from around there too. Coincidence? c.

Edit: I stand corrected, regarding the origins of the song. Like all the truly great folk songs, this one has a rich, convoluted history. Leadbelly, like CCR, was just another link in the chain.


macadavy
(Cascadia's attic, eh? ;-))
Posted: Apr 19, 2008 - 21:08
 

sdn wrote:
I know it's not supposed to matter with blues, but... John Fogarty just can't sing.


I beg to differ: JF's whisky-edged gravelly voice is perfect for the blues!
Grammarcop
(Hey, I can see Canada from here!)
Posted: Apr 04, 2008 - 02:35
 

More like the 5:30 a.m. special here in the eastern U.S.!